Nick Fradgley

Nick Fradgley
National Institute of Agricultural Botany

Bachelor of Science

About

25
Publications
6,487
Reads
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463
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
NIAB
Position
  • PhD Student
June 2012 - November 2015
Organic Research Centre
Position
  • Crops researcher
Education
October 2006 - July 2009
University of Exeter
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology and Ecology

Publications

Publications (25)
Preprint
Linking high-throughput environmental data (enviromics) into genomic prediction (GP) is a cost-effective strategy for increasing selection intensity under genotype-by-environment interactions (GxE). This study developed a data-driven approach based on Environment-Phenotype Associations (EPA) aimed at recycling important GxE information from histori...
Article
Full-text available
Background Tef (Eragrostis tef) is a tropical cereal domesticated and grown in the Ethiopian highlands, where it has been a staple food of Ethiopians for many centuries. Food insecurity and nutrient deficiencies are major problems in the country, so breeding for enhanced nutritional traits, such as Zn content, could help to alleviate problems with...
Article
Full-text available
A complex network of trade-offs exists between wheat quality and nutritional traits. We investigated the correlated relationships among several milling and baking traits as well as mineral density in refined white and whole grain flour. Our aim was to determine their pleiotropic genetic control in a multi-parent population over two trial years with...
Preprint
Background: Teff (Eragrostis teff) is a tropical cereal domesticated and grown in the Ethiopian highlands, where it has been a staple food of Ethiopians for many centuries. Food insecurity and nutrient deficiencies are major problems in the country, so breeding for enhanced nutritional traits, such as Zn content, could help to alleviate problems wi...
Article
Full-text available
The extent to which the quality and yield of plant varieties are influenced by the environment is important for their successful uptake by end users particularly as climatic fluctuations are resulting in environments that are highly variable from one growing season to another. The genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) of milling quality and yie...
Article
Full-text available
Background Selection has dramatically shaped genetic and phenotypic variation in bread wheat. We can assess the genomic basis of historical phenotypic changes, and the potential for future improvement, using experimental populations that attempt to undo selection through the randomizing effects of recombination. Results We bred the NIAB Diverse MA...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) is a major nutrient limiting productivity in many ecosystems. The large N demands associated with food crop production are met mainly through the provision of synthetic N fertiliser, leading to economic and ecological costs. Optimising the balance between N supply and demand is key to reducing N losses to the environment. Wheat (Tritic...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in genomics have expedited the improvement of several agriculturally important crops but similar efforts in wheat (Triticum spp.) have been more challenging. This is largely owing to the size and complexity of the wheat genome¹, and the lack of genome-assembly data for multiple wheat lines2,3. Here we generated ten chromosome pseudomolecul...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Breeding has helped improve bread wheat yield significantly over the last century. Understanding the potential for future crop improvement depends on relating segregating genetic variation to agronomic traits. Results We bred NIAB Diverse MAGIC population, comprising over 500 recombinant inbred lines, descended from sixteen bread wheat...
Article
Full-text available
Crop populations derived from experimental crosses enable the genetic dissection of complex traits and support modern plant breeding. Among these, multi-parent populations now play a central role. By mixing and recombining the genomes of multiple founders, multi-parent populations combine many commonly sought beneficial properties of genetic mappin...
Article
Full-text available
AimsSelection for optimal root system architecture (RSA) is important to ensure genetic gains in the sustainable production of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Here we examine the hypothesis that past wheat breeding has led to changes in RSA and that future breeding efforts can focus directly on RSA to improve adaptation to target environments.Methods...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aims Selection for optimal root system architecture (RSA) is important to ensure genetic gains in the sustainable production of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.). Here we examine the idea that past wheat breeding has led to changes in RSA and that future breeding efforts can focus directly on root traits to improve adaptation to a target environment....
Article
Full-text available
Wheat and barley are two of the founder crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent, and currently represent crops of major economic importance in temperate regions. Due to impacts on yield, quality and end‐use, grain morphometric traits remain an important goal for modern breeding programmes and are believed to have been selected for by human popul...
Article
Full-text available
Information on crop pedigrees can be used to help maximise genetic gain in crop breeding and allow efficient management of genetic resources. We present a pedigree resource of 2,657 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes originating from 38 countries, representing more than a century of breeding and variety development. Visualisation of the pedigre...
Article
Highlights • Subsidiary crops cultivation affects soil quality enhancing biochemical activity. • Subsidiary crops short-term effect on soil were similar in the mild pedo-climatic zones. • High rainfall and low temperature may reduce the effect of subsidiary crops growth on soil. • The Mediterranean north was the most suitable climate to promote...
Article
Full-text available
A crops ability to both suppress weed growth and tolerate weed competition is a key consideration when taking an agroecological approach to weed management. Amongst other cereals, oats are widely considered to have superior weed competitiveness yet studies examining competitive ability of oat varieties are rare. We investigated the ability of oats...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Organic farming aims at developing farming systems that do not need unsustainable inputs such as mineral fertilisers and pesticides to regulate the cropping environment. Such systems need crop varieties that are resilient against multiple and variable biotic and abiotic stresses and that make efficient use of the nutrients and resources that are av...
Conference Paper
Cover crops and living mulches form an integral component of conservation agriculture promoting soil health and minimising external inputs. The OSCAR Project (Optimising Subsidiary Crop Applications in Rotation) aims to improve practices of conservation agriculture in farming systems across Europe. The principal output of the project is to develop...
Technical Report
Full-text available
An increasingly fluctuating global climate is creating mounting problems for production in agricultural systems. One possible way to buffer these changes is with the use of genetically diverse composite cross populations. Here we demonstrate in replicated field trials that composite cross populations of winter wheat when grown in organic conditions...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background The extremely diverse genetic variation in wheat Composite Cross Populations (CCP) represents a valuable source of breeding material. Such material could be selected as part of a participatory breeding programme with the potential advantage of selecting adaptation targeted for particular environments. For example, selections could be ma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Abstract: Dependence on unsustainable herbicide inputs as well as degradation of soil and high energy consumption of mechanical weed control means that crop competitive ability is a key component of an integrated, ecological approach to weed management. Variation in competitive ability among crop cultivars and their associated weed suppressive trai...

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