Nicholas Ravanelli

Nicholas Ravanelli
Lakehead University Thunder Bay Campus · School of Kinesiology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

39
Publications
5,268
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352
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Background: Post-menopausal females appear resistant to the beneficial effects of exercise on endothelial function. Repeated increases in shear stress are considered important mediators of exercise-induced improvements in endothelial function. It is therefore possible that endothelial sensitivity to shear stress is reduced in post-menopausal femal...
Article
Aim: Heat therapy is a promising strategy to improve cardiometabolic health. This study evaluated the acute physiological responses to hot water immersion in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: On separate days in randomized order, 13 adults with T2DM (8 males/5 females, 62 ± 12 yrs, BMI: 30.1 ± 4.6 kg/m2) were immersed in ther...
Article
Purpose: The benefits of exercise on vascular health are inconsistent in postmenopausal females. We investigated if blood pressure and markers of vascular function differ between physically active early post- and late premenopausal females. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional comparison of 24-h blood pressure, brachial artery flow-mediated d...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Despite the well-established benefits of exercise, pregnant women are discouraged from physical activity in hot/humid conditions to avoid hyperthermia (core temperature (Tcore) ≥ 39.0 °C). Recent epidemiological evidence also demonstrates greater risk of negative birth outcomes following heat exposure during pregnancy, possibly due to th...
Article
Human thermoregulatory control is often evaluated through the relationship between thermoeffector output and core or mean body temperature. In addition to providing a general indication of whether a variable of interest alters thermoregulatory control, this relationship is often used to determine how this alteration may occur. This latter interpret...
Article
Introduction: Exercise thermoregulation studies typically control for time of day. The present study assessed whether circadian rhythm independently alters time-dependent changes in core temperature and sweating during exercise at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (Hprod) during the wake period. Methods: Ten men (26±2 y, 76.6±6.3 kg, 1.9...
Article
COVID-19 may increase the risk of heat-related symptoms during hot weather since vulnerable populations, including the elderly and those with neurological disabilities, must continue to self-isolate, often indoors. Within the chronic neurological patient population, indoor conditions in summer months present a hazard because of impaired and/or alte...
Article
New findings: What is the central question of this study? Does passive heat acclimation alter glomerular filtration rate and urine concentrating ability in response to passive heat stress? What is the main finding and its importance? Glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged following passive heat stress, and heat acclimation did not alter thi...
Article
Key points: When exercise was prescribed to elicit a fixed evaporative heat balance requirement (Ereq), no differences in steady-state sweat rates were observed with different absolute esophageal and/or skin temperatures, secondary to differences in time of the day (i.e. AM vs. PM) and ambient temperature (i.e. 23°C vs. 33°C). Exercise at a fixed...
Article
New findings: What is the central question of this study? Hypoxia reportedly does not impair thermoregulation during exercise in compensable heat stress conditions, but whether it has an impact on maximal heat dissipation and therefore the critical environmental limit for the physiological compensability of core temperature is unknown. What is the...
Article
New findings: What is the central question of this study? Are fitness-related improvements in thermoregulatory responses during uncompensable heat stress mediated by aerobic capacity (VO2max ) or is it the partial acclimation associated with training? What is the main finding and its importance? During uncompensable heat stress, individuals with h...
Article
Key points: With the advent of more frequent extreme heat events, adaptability to hot environments will be crucial for the survival of many species, including humans. However, the mechanisms that mediate human heat adaptation have remained elusive. We tested the hypothesis that heat acclimation improves the neural control of body temperature. Skin...
Article
This study assessed whether, notwithstanding lower resting absolute core temperatures, alterations in time-dependent changes in thermoregulatory responses following partial and complete heat acclimation (HA) are only evident during uncompensable heat stress. Eight untrained individuals underwent 8-weeks of aerobic training (i.e. partial HA) followe...
Chapter
This chapter describes the fundamental factors that influence heat exchange between the human body and its surrounding environment. The bulk of heat exchange takes place at the skin surface via sensible heat transfer (i.e. convection and radiation) and evaporation. With increasing ambient temperature, the gradient for sensible heat transfer decline...
Article
Purpose: Studies often assess the impact of sex on the relation between core body temperature (CBT), whole-body sweat rate (WBSR), and heat production during exercise in laboratory settings, but less is known in free-living conditions. Therefore, the authors compared the relation between CBT, WBSR, and heat production between sexes in a 15-km race...
Article
Objective: Pregnant women are advised to avoid heat stress (eg, excessive exercise and/or heat exposure) due to the risk of teratogenicity associated with maternal hyperthermia; defined as a core temperature (Tcore) ≥39.0°C. However, guidelines are ambiguous in terms of critical combinations of climate and activity to avoid and may therefore unnec...
Article
Purpose: To quantify how maximum skin wettedness (ωmax), i.e. the determinant of the boundary between compensable and uncompensable heat stress, is i) altered by aerobic training in previously unfit individuals, and ii) further augmented by heat acclimation. Methods: Eight untrained individuals completed an 8-week aerobic training program immedi...
Article
Some studies have observed a functional relationship between sweating and skin blood flow. However, the implications of this relationship during physiologically-relevant conditions remain unclear. We manipulated sudomotor activity through changes in sweating efficiency to determine if parallel changes in vasomotor activity are observed. Eight young...
Article
This study sought to assess the within-subject influence of acute hypoxia on exercise-induced changes in core temperature and sweating. Eight participants [1.75 (0.06) m, 70.2 (6.8) kg, 25 (4) y, 54 (8) mL(.)kg(-1)(.)min(-1)] completed 45 min of cycling, once in normoxia (NORM; FiO2=0.21) and twice in hypoxia (HYP1/HYP2; FiO2=0.13) at 34.4(0.2)°C,...
Article
Full-text available
We sought to identify the appropriate exercise intensity for unbiased comparisons of changes in rectal temperature (ΔTre) and local sweat rates (LSR) between groups unmatched for body size during uncompensable heat stress. Sixteen males vastly different in body morphology were separated into two equal groups [small (SM): 65.8 ± 6.2 kg, 1.8 ± 0.1 m2...
Article
Electric fan use in extreme heat wave conditions has been thought to be disadvantageous because it might accelerate heat gain to the body via convection. However, it has been recently shown that fan use delays increases in heart rate even at high temperatures (42 °C) in young adults. We here assess the biophysical and physiological mechanisms under...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence demonstrates that for unbiased comparisons of changes in core temperature (ΔTcore) between groups unmatched for body morphology, exercise should be performed using a fixed heat production (Hprod) per unit mass in physiologically compensable environments [1]. In uncompensable conditions, it has been suggested that a fixed external workload...
Article
Acute acetaminophen (ACT) ingestion has been reported to reduce thermal strain during cycling in the heat. In this study, nine active participants ingested 20 mg of ACT per kg of total body mass (ACT) or a placebo (PLA), 60 min prior to cycling at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (ACT: 8.3 ± 0.3 W/kg; PLA: 8.5 ± 0.5 W/kg), which was equiva...
Article
Full-text available
This article was accepted for publication in the Journal of the American Medical Association [© American Medical Association] and the definitive version is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2015.153
Article
Heat waves continue to claim lives, with the elderly and poor at greatest risk. A simple and cost-effective intervention is an electric fan, but public health agencies warn against their use despite no evidence refuting their efficacy in heat waves. A conceptual human heat balance model can be used to estimate the evaporative requirement for heat b...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: To reevaluate the previous hypothesis that greater reductions in self-paced exercise intensity in the heat are mediated by early differences in the rate of body heat storage (S). Methods: Eight trained volunteers cycled in 19 °C/1.8 kPa (COOL), 25 °C/1.2 kPa (NORM), and 34 °C/1.6 kPa (HOT), while maintaining an RPE of 16. Potential differen...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To evaluate thermal comfort and sensation throughout the summer in both children and their parents.