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Nicholas Gardner

Nicholas Gardner
WVU Potomac State College · Mary F. Shipper Library

Master of Library and Information Science

About

20
Publications
2,270
Reads
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220
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in the use of historical newspapers in education, vertebrate paleontology, Open Access, and many other things.
Research Experience
January 2020 - present
Potomac State College
Position
  • Staff Librarian
August 2019 - December 2019
Potomac State College
Position
  • Program Coordinator
January 2016 - July 2019
Potomac State College
Position
  • Library Technical Assistant I/II
Education
January 2018 - May 2019
Clarion University
Field of study
  • Information and Library Science
August 2008 - May 2015
Marshall University
Field of study
  • Biology
January 2006 - May 2008
Potomac State College
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (20)
Presentation
Full-text available
Jagielska, N., Buttler, C., Gardner, N., Warnock, R., and Yates, D. (2021, December 17). Fossils from conflict zones: A tale of Myanmar amber. In E. Dunne and N. B. Raja (Chairs), Social justice in palaeontology: Case studies & future actions [Pre-conference workshop, virtual]. The Palaeontology Association Annual Meeting, Manchester, United Kingdo...
Presentation
Gardner, N. (2021, December 9). Communicating multiple origins of flight; lessons learned from the “debate” over avian origins [Conference presentation]. The International Pennaraptoran Dinosaur Symposium 2 Theropod Flight Origins Online Exploratory Meeting, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR, China.
Article
Full-text available
Rare appearances of bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in river systems and other freshwater ecosystems have been reported from five continents. The wide geographic range of this phenomenon, the physiological adaptations of this species to allow for movement into rivers, and a fossil record in the Miocene Epoch, all imply that this behavior has a lo...
Presentation
Full-text available
Powered flight has only evolved 3 times in vertebrates, with Pterosauria not only being the first to achieve it, but also including the largest fliers ever to evolve. Recent findings have linked them to a group of small, primarily terrestrial archosaurs closely related to but outside of Dinosauria, though we still do not have intermediate forms to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Despite robust debate amongst bat researchers in the 1980s through 1990s, a scientific consensus has largely been reached, through the accumulation of evidence from the fossil record, anatomy, and molecular data, that Chiroptera is monophyletic. At present, among bat evolutionary biologists, the debate largely remains focused on whether flight or e...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New ancient DNA and paleoproteomic studies of fossil Aenocyon dirus (formerly Canis dirus) (Dire Wolf) specimens have reshaped family tree of Canina (“wolf-like” canids), placing Aenocyon at the base of Canina, diverging prior to Lupulella (jackals) and Lycaon (African wild dog). Previous morphology-only studies or combined morphology-molecular stu...
Presentation
Full-text available
Are you thinking about undertaking a newspaper digitization project in your library? You're not alone. Plenty of us have already gone down this road. Let's talk about processes, vendors, funding, and more. Come to this interactive session to hear how you can align your project with on-going digitization initiatives in West Virginia.
Presentation
Full-text available
Here, we report preliminary findings from ex situ collecting and bulk sampling from a locality within the Severn/Brightseat Formation from Prince Georges County, Maryland. These formations represent shallow marine deposits and various studies have been conducted. From ex situ collecting, in this locality, the only readily observed invertebrate is E...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is no clear-cut boundary between Free and Open Source Software and Open Scholarship, and the histories, practices, and fundamental principles between the two remain complex. In this study, we critically appraise the intersections and differences between the two movements. Based on our thematic comparison here, we conclude several key things....
Article
Full-text available
This is an open letter concerning the recent launch of the new open access journal, Science Advances. In addition to the welcome diversification in journal choices for authors looking for open access venues, there are many positive aspects of Science Advances: its broad STEM scope, its interest in cross-disciplinary research, and the offering of fe...
Article
Full-text available
Crocodyliforms were one of the most successful groups of Mesozoic tetrapods, radiating into terrestrial, semiaquatic and marine environments, while occupying numerous trophic niches, including carnivorous, insectivorous, herbivorous, and piscivorous species. Among these taxa were the enigmatic, poorly represented flat-headed crocodyliforms from the...
Data
Character lists and matrices used in phylogenetic analysis. (DOC)
Article
Full-text available
Detailed descriptions of braincase anatomy in early diapsid reptiles have been historically rare given the difficulty of accessing this deep portion of the skull, because of poor preservation of the fossils or the inability to remove the surrounding skull roof. Previous descriptions of the braincase of Youngina capensis, a derived stem-diapsid rept...
Article
Full-text available
Although the mandibular symphysis is a functionally and evolutionarily important feature of the vertebrate skull, little is known about the soft-tissue morphology of the joint in squamate reptiles. Lizards evolved a diversity of skull shapes and feeding behaviors, thus it is expected that the morphology of the symphysis will correspond with functio...
Article
Full-text available
Detailed descriptions of braincase anatomy in early diapsid reptiles have been historically rare given the difficulty of accessing this deep portion of the skull, because of poor preservation of the fossils or the inability to remove the surrounding skull roof. Previous descriptions of the braincase of Youngina capensis, a derived stem-diapsid rept...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Is there an authoritative assessment of what the physiographic provinces of West Virginia are?
The WVGES lists five provinces based on Lessing (1996): the Allegheny Mountain section, the Appalachian Plateau, the Blue Ridge, Great Valley, and Valley and Ridge (1).
The US Geological Survey lists three: Blue Ridge, Appalachian Plateau, and Valley and Ridge (2).
Creemens et al. (2003) give Parkersburg Plateau, Logan Plateau, Allegheny Plateau, and the Ridge and Valley Province (p. 803).
Jensen et al. (2017) only recognize two: the Appalachian Plateau and the Valley and Ridge (Fig. 1, p. 3352).
Southworth et al. recognize Blue Ridge province (only the eastern most Jefferson County), Great Valley section (most of Jefferson County), the Valley and Ridge Province, and the Appalachian Plateau (Fig. 1, p. 2).
Does anyone concretely know which is the most correct/relevant? If you were interested in studying plant flora differences in physiographic provinces, which would you use? I feel like it would be more meaningful to start with more granular regions.
References (citations aren't perfect)
1. Physiographic provinces of West Virginia. (2019, December 18). West Virginia Geological & Economic Survey. http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/geology/geolphyp.htm
2. “Physiographic Divisions of the Conterminous U.S.” – U.S. Geological Survey.
Cremeens, D. L., MacDonald, D. H., & Lothrop, J. C. (2003). Holocene colluvial soils and geoarchaeology in the Unglaciated Appalachian Plateau: Two examples from West Virginia, USA. Geoarchaeology 18(7), 799-826.
Jensen et al. (2017). Headwater stream length dynamics across four physiographic provinces of the Appalachian Highlands. Hydrological Processes, 31, 3350-3363.
Southworth et al. (2008). Geology of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park and Potomac River Corridor, District of Columbia, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. United States Geological Survey.
Question
Does anyone have any papers they'd recommend on biogeographic analyses using recent and historic accounts of the presence/absence of spp to compare/contrast on the distribution of plant spp? For instance, our state checklist specifies whether taxa were ID'd prior to 1977 or post-1977 (between periods of major botanical field work), and I would like to see if there's a change vs older accounts of the distribution of plant spp (i.e. going back into the 1920s-1930s) and see if human activities may have affected/disrupted the extent of these plant spp.

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Understanding the impact of human culture on sharks.