Nicholas Friedenberg

Nicholas Friedenberg
Corteva Agriscience · R&D

Ph.D.

About

30
Publications
2,437
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466
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
200 Citations
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Introduction
** Download reprints of Nicholas Friedenberg's publications from archidictus.org/theory/publications** Nicholas Friedenberg uses mathematical models to address ecological and evolutionary questions in the management and conservation of populations. His current research focuses on agricultural sustainability.

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Wind energy is an important sector of the renewable energy market. Observations of bat fatalities at wind farms raise concern about impacts to biodiversity, particularly amid projections of wind energy build-out. We investigated how continued wind energy development in the United States and Canada, as well as adoption of measures to reduce bat fata...
Article
• While invasions of large rivers by exotic fish species are well documented, assessing actual or potential impacts on native species is a challenge. Rapid assessments may be possible through the application of a combination of bioenergetic and population dynamic models. • Paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) is a native species in the central USA with a...
Technical Report
Abstract:While population size can be difficult to measure, information on fatalities and trends in relative abundance is often collected in the course of monitoring for regulatory compliance. This project examined the feasibility of developing a general tool for combining information on fatalities and trends in relative abundance to produce a cons...
Article
Full-text available
Synthetic biology has the potential for a broad array of applications. However, realization of this potential is challenged by the paucity of relevant data for conventional risk assessment protocols, a limitation due to to the relative nascence of the field, as well as the poorly characterized and prioritized hazard, exposure, and dose–response con...
Conference Paper
**Slides available at http://www.archidictus.org/theory/entomology_presentations/2018_IRM_density_dependence.pdf ** Density dependence in agricultural pest populations fundamentally affects the rate of pesticide resistance evolution. Density dependence is often measured in experiments that vary the initial density of a cohort and measure the number...
Article
The development of “snapshot” metrics that can serve as reliable diagnostic tools for rapidly assessing population status has great appeal. We used stochastic simulation modeling and recursive partitioning to evaluate the reliability of two proposed snapshot metrics in territorial raptors: the floater/breeder ratio and the rate of nest occupancy by...
Technical Report
The report explores the quantitative modeling framework being developed by the Fish and Wildlife Service to better assess and predict risk to eagles. This framework builds on modeling motivated by permitting take at wind farms but will be applied to electric distribution lines, as well. As such, it integrates information on electrocution risk and d...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been recognized that pest population dynamics can affect the durability of a pesticide, but dose remains the primary component of insect resistance management (IRM). For transgenic pesticidal traits such as Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae)), dose (measured as the mortality of susceptibles caused by a toxin)...
Article
Full-text available
Mountain pine beetles (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) are aggressive insects attacking Pinus host trees. Pines use defensive resin to overwhelm attackers, creating an Allee effect requiring beetles to attack en masse to successfully reproduce. MPB kill hosts, leaving observable, dying trees with red needles. Landscape patterns of infestation...
Conference Paper
Models of pesticide resistance evolution commonly assume that genes for insect resistance are unlinked, despite limited supporting evidence. Although this assumption has been justified on theoretical grounds, few studies have examined the sensitivity of crop durability to genetic linkage in complex agricultural landscapes. We use the RAMAS IRM mode...
Conference Paper
Models of pesticide resistance evolution have commonly employed either a frequency-based or abundance-based approach. Particularly for a structured-refuge IRM strategy, as commonly used with PIP crops, the two approaches can deliver dramatically different assessments of the time to resistance. Drawing on general theory of source-sink evolution, we...
Conference Paper
We present a modeling framework in which forest pest infestation dynamics respond to and affect forest structure. The model makes use of an efficient homogenization routine that can increase the speed of iterations 1000-fold with negligible fidelity loss. We use the model to demonstrate a method of risk analysis for forest pests that puts hazard ra...
Article
Full-text available
A pathogen can readily mutate to infect new host types, but this does not guarantee successful establishment in the new habitat. What factors, then, dictate emergence success? One possibility is that the pathogen population cannot sustain itself on the new host type (i.e. host is a sink), but migration from a source population allows adaptive susta...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm., established that its population in east Texas responds to a delayed density-dependent process, whereas no clear role of climate has been determined. We tested two biological hypotheses for the influence of extreme temperatures on annual southern pine beetle population growt...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of host use by herbivore pests can have serious consequences for natural and managed ecosystems but are often poorly understood. Here, we provide the first quantification of large differential impacts of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, on loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., and longleaf pine, Pinus palustris P. Mill...
Article
In populations subject to positive density dependence, individuals can increase their fitness by synchronizing the timing of key life history events. However, phenological synchrony represents a perturbation from a population's stable stage structure and the ensuing transient dynamics create troughs of low abundance that can promote extinction. Usi...
Article
Full-text available
Populations are at risk of extinction when unsuitable or when sink habitat exceeds a threshold frequency in the environment. Sinks that present cues associated with high-quality habitats, termed ecological traps, have especially detrimental effects on net population growth at metapopulation scales. Ecological traps for viruses arise naturally, or c...
Article
Full-text available
Viruses can occasionally emerge by infecting new host species. However, the early phases of emergence can hinge upon ecological sustainability of the virus population, which is a product of both within-host population growth and between-host transmission. Insufficient growth or transmission can force virus extinction before the latter phases of eme...
Article
Full-text available
Pathogens vectored by nematodes pose serious agricultural, economic, and health threats; however, little is known of the ecological and evolutionary aspects of pathogen transmission by nematodes. Here we describe a novel model system with two trophic levels, bacteriophages and nematodes, each of which competes for bacteria. We demonstrate for the f...
Article
Full-text available
Viruses can occasionally emerge by infecting new host species. However, the early phases of emergence can hinge upon ecological sustainability of the virus population, which is a product of both within‐host population growth and between‐host transmission. Insufficient growth or transmission can force virus extinction before the latter phases of eme...
Article
Both dispersal and local competitive ability may determine the outcome of competition among species that cannot coexist locally. I develop a spatially implicit model of two-species competition at a small spatial scale. The model predicts the relative fitness of two competitors based on local reproductive rates and regional dispersal rates in the co...
Article
The world is an uncertain place. Individuals’ fates vary from place to place and from time to time. Natural selection in unpredictable environments should favour individuals that hedge their bets by dispersing offspring. I confirm this basic prediction using Caenorhabditis elegans in experimental microcosms. My results agree with evolutionary model...
Article
"September 20, 2002" Thesis (Ph.D.)--Dartmouth College, 2002. Includes bibliographical references

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
Understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of mountain pine beetle outbreaks.