Nicholas A Everett

Nicholas A Everett
The University of Sydney · School of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy
Nick is currently researching novel molecules for treating opioid withdrawal and psychostimulant relapse.

About

23
Publications
2,249
Reads
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334
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
330 Citations
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Introduction
Dr Nick Everett is a post-doctoral researcher a the University of Sydney. His research explores the neurocircuitry underpinning drug withdrawal and relapse, and develops novel oxytocin-based therapies for addictions. Nick's research uses intravenous drug self-administration procedures in conjunction with immunofluorescence, intracranial microinjections, chemogenetics, fibre photometry, ultrasonic vocalisations, and machine-learning guided behaviour analyses.
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
The University of Sydney
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2016 - January 2019
Macquarie University
Position
  • Master of Research (student)
March 2014 - present
Macquarie University
Position
  • Academic Tutor
Description
  • Introduction to Psychology I & II, Biopsychology and Learning, Design & Statistics II
Education
March 2014 - December 2015
Macquarie University
Field of study
  • Behavioral Neuropharmacology
March 2009 - June 2013
Macquarie University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Methamphetamine (METH, “ice”) is a potent and addictive psychostimulant. Abuse of METH perturbs neurotransmitter systems and induces neurotoxicity; however, the neurobiological mechanisms which underlie addiction to METH are not fully understood, limiting the efficacy of available treatments. Here we investigate METH-induced changes to...
Article
Full-text available
Early life stress (ELS) is associated with perturbed neural development and augmented vulnerability to mental health disorders, including addiction. How ELS changes the brain to increase addiction risk is poorly understood, and there are no therapies which target this ELS-induced vulnerability. ELS disrupts the oxytocin system, which can modulate a...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale Cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) are non-psychoactive components of the cannabis plant. CBD has been well characterised to have anxiolytic and anticonvulsant activity, whereas the behavioural effects of CBDA are less clear. Preclinical and clinical data suggests that CBD has antipsychotic properties and reduces methamphetam...
Preprint
Full-text available
Registration of data to a common frame of reference is an essential step in the analysis and integration of diverse neuroscientific data modalities. To this end, volumetric brain atlases enable histological datasets to be spatially registered and analysed, yet accurate registration remains expertise-dependent and slow. We have trained a neural netw...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale Stress exposure during adolescence contributes to developing a methamphetamine (METH) use disorder. However, most of the studies investigating addiction-related behaviours include only male rodents, despite METH addiction rates being higher in females. Furthermore, animal studies investigating the effects of stress on methamphetamine addi...
Article
Introduction Oxytocin is a versatile hypothalamic neuropeptide involved in diverse neurobehavioural processes. Since oxytocin can elicit anxiolytic and serenic effects, one could hypothesise that oxytocin should prime the brain for sleep and promote hypnogenesis. However, based on the social salience hypothesis—that oxytocin promotes prosocial beha...
Article
Early life stress (ELS) exposure alters brain development, increasing vulnerability for mental illness in adulthood, including depression. Despite this association, there are no approved pharmacotherapies to protect against the emergence of mental illness resulting from ELS. Recent preclinical work showed that oxytocin (OT) administration in adulth...
Article
Full-text available
RationaleThe development of effective anxiety treatments has been hindered by limited understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in anxiety regulation. Whilst gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is one mechanism consistently implicated in anxiety regulation, PFC subregions may contribute uni...
Article
Background The incentive sensitisation theory of addiction posits that drug-associated stimuli become imbued with incentive motivational properties, driving pathological drug seeking. However, pre-existing variability in the incentive salience to non-drug reward cues (‘sign trackers’ (STs); ‘goal trackers’ (GTs)) is also predictive of the desire fo...
Article
The early postnatal period is a time of tremendous change for the dam and her offspring. Environmental insults, such as repeated stress exposure during this time can have detrimental effects. Of the research that has focused on the effect of postnatal stress exposure on the dams, conflicting changes in maternal care and anxiety‐like behaviour have...
Article
The neuropeptide oxytocin has emerged as a promising pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine (METH) addiction, and clinical trials of intranasal oxytocin are underway. However, there is debate as to how peripherally administered oxytocin alters brain signalling to modulate addiction processes. Interestingly, there is evidence for functional interaction...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background The neuropeptide oxytocin has emerged as a promising pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine (METH) addiction, and clinical trials of intranasal oxytocin are underway. However, there is debate as to how peripherally administered oxytocin alters brain signaling to modulate addiction processes. Interestingly, there is evidence for functional i...
Article
Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is characterised by chronic relapse and anxiety, for which there are no effective pharmacotherapies. Acute treatment with the neuropeptide oxytocin has shown therapeutic potential for METH addiction and has social and anxiolytic effects in METH-naïve rats. However, the effects of chronic oxytocin treatment in METH-exper...
Article
Addiction to the psychostimulant Methamphetamine (METH) is characterised by high rates of relapse. Currently there are no approved effective pharmacotherapies for METH dependence. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXY) potently reduces METH-seeking behaviours in rodent models of relapse and is now being used in clinical trials to treat drug-dependent indi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that can cause many adverse physical, psychological and psychosocial effects. Preliminary evidence shows cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating constituent of the cannabis plant, may have efficacy in treating opioid and nicotine dependence. However, no study has yet examined whether cannabidiol treatm...
Article
Early life trauma is strongly associated with an increased vulnerability to abuse illicit drugs and the impairment of neural development. This includes alterations to the development of the oxytocin system, which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of social behaviours and emotion. Dysregulation of this important system also contributes to incre...
Article
The psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive illicit drug. Systemic administration of the neuropeptide oxytocin modulates METH-related reward and METH-seeking behaviour. Recent findings demonstrated a reduction in METH-induced reward by oxytocin administration into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. It is not known, however, if oxytoci...
Article
Drug abuse and addiction are significant problems worldwide. The abuse of “ice” (methamphetamine, “METH”) continues to destroy families, careers and lives of users, with current treatments (pharmacological or psychological) inadequate for curing addiction and the associated mental health disorders that develop with repeated METH abuse (psychoses, d...
Article
Full-text available
The psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive drug of abuse. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to modulate METH-related reward and METH-seeking behaviour. Recent findings implicated the subthalamic nucleus (STh) as a key brain region in oxytocin modulation of METH-induced reward. However, it is unclear if oxytocin acts in this r...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Santa Cruz Bio Tech no longer sell their polyclonals, and i can only seem to find anti-AVP1AR's with human reactivity, or with no published IHC/IF work, only WB/ELISA.
Thanks :)
Nick
Question
Hi guys,
Following perfusion, some of my rat brains were fixed and put in cryoprotectant solution (-20°C) whole as i did not have time to section them. They have been there for around 5 months. I now wish to block, slice, and IF stain for cFos (and some other cell bodies/receptors). 
Could anyone recommend some steps to ensure the quality of this staining? I.e. do i need to extensively wash (PBT?) the cryo off, or blot it off with tissue? 
Also, are there any issues which i may face? E.g. as they were fixed and cryoprotected whole, would i expect IF to work OK compared to if they were sliced earlier?
Thanks :)
Question
I am hoping to investigate how administration of a neurotoxic substance affects the blood-brain-barrier in the rat brain, and how a potentially neuroprotective substance attenuates this.
Could anyone please suggest an appropriate methodology for this, or point me in the direction of suitable references?
IHC/IF strategies would be highly convenient!
Thank you :) 

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
1) Investigate the effects of oxytocin treatment on chronic methamphetamine-induced behaviours 2) Identify the neural circuits which oxytocin modulates to interfere with methamphetamine-induced behaviours