Nicholas Colgrove

Nicholas Colgrove
Wake Forest University | WFU · Department of Philosophy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

24
Publications
3,710
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74
Citations
Introduction
Nicholas Colgrove works in the Department of Philosophy at Wake Forest University. He does research in Bioethics and Philosophy of Religion and is currently working on projects concerning beginning of life issues and the role of religion in clinical ethics consultations. Email: colgron@wfu.edu
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
Wake Forest University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2015 - May 2019
Baylor University
Position
  • Teacher of Record
Description
  • Taught undergraduate classes including: Introduction to Logic, Introductory Topics in Philosophy, and Introduction to Medical Ethics.
Education
August 2012 - May 2019
Baylor University
Field of study
  • Philosophy
August 2007 - May 2011
Huntington University
Field of study
  • Philosophy

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
In The Brothers Karamazov , Dostoyevsky illustrates that encounters with evil do not solely impact agents’ beliefs about God (or God’s existence). Evil impacts people on an emotional level as well. Authors like Hasker and van Inwagen sometimes identify the emotional impact of evil with the “existential” problem of evil. For better or worse, the exi...
Article
Full-text available
Subjects of ectogenesis—human beings that are developing in artificial wombs (AWs)—share the same moral status as newborns. To demonstrate this, I defend two claims. First, subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for a time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns (in the full sense of the word). Second, subjects of complete...
Article
Full-text available
Some opponents of abortion claim fetuses are persons from the moment of conception. Call these “Personhood-At-Conception” (or PAC), opponents of abortion. Amy Berg (2017, Philosophical Studies 174:1217–26) argues that if fetuses are persons from the moment of conception, then miscarriage kills far more people than abortion. Thus, PAC opponents of a...
Article
The rapid development of artificial womb technologies means that we must consider if and when it is permissible to kill the human subject of ectogestation—recently termed a ‘gestateling’ by Elizabeth Chloe Romanis—prior to ‘birth’. We describe the act of deliberately killing the gestateling as gestaticide, and argue that there are good reasons to m...
Article
Full-text available
The privation theory of evil (PTE) states that evil is the absence of some good that is supposed to be present. For example, if vision is an intrinsic good, and if human beings are supposed to have vision, then PTE implies that a human being’s lacking vision is an evil, or a bad state of affairs. The mere-difference view of disability (MDD) states...
Article
Clinical ethics consultants (CECs) are not moral authorities. Standardization of CECs’ professional role does not confer upon them moral authority. Certification of particular CECs does not confer upon them moral authority (nor does it reflect such authority). Or, so we will argue. This article offers a distinctly Orthodox Christian response to tho...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, Brummett and Crutchfield advanced two critiques of theists who object to moral enhancement. First, a conceptual critique: theists who oppose moral enhancement commonly do so because virtue is thought to be acquired only via a special kind of process. Enhancement does not involve such processes. Hence, enhancement cannot produce virtue. Ye...
Article
Opponents of abortion are commonly said to be inconsistent in their beliefs or actions, and to fail in their obligations to prevent the deaths of embryos and fetuses from causes other than induced abortion. We have argued that these ‘inconsistency arguments’ conform to a pattern which is susceptible to a number of objections, and that consequently...
Article
William Simkulet has recently criticised Colgrove et al ’s defence against what they have called inconsistency arguments—arguments that claim opponents of abortion (OAs) act in ways inconsistent with their underlying beliefs about human fetuses (eg, that human fetuses are persons at conception). Colgrove et al presented three objections to inconsis...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, I argued that subjects inside of artificial wombs—termed ‘gestatelings’ by Romanis—share the same legal and moral status as newborns (neonates). Gestatelings, on my view, are persons in both a legal and moral sense. Kingma challenges these claims. Specifically, Kingma argues that my previous argument is invalid, as it equivocates on the t...
Article
There are numerous ways in which “the particular”—particular individuals (whether patients or physicians), particular ideologies, values, beliefs, and perspectives—are sometimes overlooked, ignored, or even driven out of the healthcare profession. In many such cases, this is bad for patients, practitioners, and the profession (or so I argue). Hence...
Article
Opponents of abortion are often described as ‘inconsistent’ (hypocrites) in terms of their beliefs, actions and/or priorities. They are alleged to do too little to combat spontaneous abortion, they should be adopting cryopreserved embryos with greater frequency and so on. These types of arguments—which we call ‘inconsistency arguments’—conform to a...
Article
McCarthy et al.’s proposal gains much of its plausibility by relying on a superficial treatment of justice, human dignity, sin, and the common good within the Christian tradition. Upon closer inspection of what these terms mean within the context of Christianity, it becomes clear that despite using the same phrases (e.g., a commitment to “protectin...
Article
Rob Lovering has developed an interesting new critique of views that regard embryos as equally valuable as other human beings: the moral argument for frozen human embryo adoption. The argument is aimed at those who believe that the death of a frozen embryo is a very bad thing, and Lovering concludes that some who hold this view ought to prevent one...
Article
Full-text available
Janet Malek (2019) argues that a "clinical ethics consultant's religious worldview has no place in developing ethical recommendations or communicating about them with patients, surrogates, and clinicians." She offers five types of arguments in support of this thesis: Arguments from (i) consensus, (ii) clarity, (iii) availability, (iv) consistency,...
Poster
Full-text available
Call for Papers: Special issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy. Topic: Miscarriage and Spontaneous Abortion. Deadline: June 15, 2020.
Poster
Full-text available
Call for Papers: Special issue of Christian Bioethics. Topic: Christian Perspectives on Emerging Reproductive Technologies and Research. Deadline: June 15, 2020.
Article
Full-text available
Recently, I argued that human subjects in artificial wombs (AWs) "share the same moral status as newborns" and so, deserve the same treatment and protections as newborns. This thesis rests on two claims: (A) "Subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for at time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns," and (B) "Subjects...
Article
Full-text available
Jake Greenblum and Ryan K. Hubbard argue that physicians, nurses, clinical ethicists, and ethics committee members should not cite religious considerations when helping patients (or their proxies) make medical decisions. They provide two arguments for this position: The Public Reason Argument and the Fiduciary Argument. In this essay, I show that t...
Article
Full-text available
Anna Christensen argues that it is implausible to claim that abortion and murder are morally impermissible given that they deprive individuals of a future like ours (or ’FLO'). In this essay, I provide two responses to Christensen’s argument. First, I show that the premises upon which Christensen’s argument relies have implausible implications. Sec...
Thesis
Full-text available
There are many cries to resist particular objects (e.g. inequality in the workplace) but very little is said concerning the nature of resistance. As such, this project begins by mapping the concept of resistance. Next, I develop several tools that allow us to distinguish between reasonable and unreasonable instances of resistance. I then argue that...
Article
In “Knowledge and epistemic necessity,” John Hawthorne gives a defense of what he rightly calls the “standard approach” to epistemic possibility against what he calls a new “competing idea” presented by Dougherty and Rysiew which he notes has been “endorsed and elaborated upon” by Fantl and McGrath. According to the standard approach, roughly, p is...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
A series of papers exploring the ethics of abortion, ectogenesis and infanticide.