Nicholas P. Burnett

Nicholas P. Burnett
University of California, Davis | UCD · Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior

PhD, Integrative Biology

About

26
Publications
4,300
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
206
Citations
Introduction
I'm a postdoctoral fellow at UC Davis. My research interests include the ecology, biomechanics, physiology, and biophysics of organisms living in physically stressful habitats, such as insects in wind-blown plant canopies and organisms in wave-swept, rocky intertidal zones. I am also very interested in examining how institutional practices, such as interview procedures and the management of professional societies, influence equity, diversity, and inclusion in STEM.
Education
August 2012 - June 2017
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Integrative Biology
August 2008 - May 2012
University of South Carolina
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Since its emergence two decades ago, the use of infrared technology for noninvasively measuring the heartbeat rates of invertebrates has provided valuable insight into the physiology and ecology of intertidal organisms. During that time period, the hardware needed for this method has been adapted to currently available electronic components, making...
Article
Full-text available
The calcareous exoskeletons of bivalve molluscs protect the organisms from environmental stressors, including physical loads like impacts (e.g., from wave-borne rocks) and compressions (e.g., from predators). The magnitude and time scales of physical loads can occur over a wide range of values, and little is known about how the strength of bivalve...
Article
In shallow coastal areas, the fronds of long, flexible kelp can become knotted (a single frond tied around itself) and tangled (multiple fronds intertwined) as they move back and forth with ocean waves. We investigated the ecological and physical consequence of being knotted and tangled for the intertidal kelp Egregia menziesii in northern Californ...
Article
Full-text available
The resistance of macroalgae to damage by hydrodynamic forces depends on the mechanical properties of their tissues. Although factors such as water-flow environment, algal growth rate, and damage by herbivores have been shown to influence various material properties of macroalgal tissues, the interplay of these factors as they change seasonally and...
Article
Full-text available
Macroalgae provide food and habitat to a diversity of organisms in marine systems, so structural damage and breakage of thallus tissue can have important ecological consequences for the composition and dynamics of marine communities. Common sources of macroalgal damage include breakage by hydrodynamic forces imposed by ambient water currents and wa...
Article
Full-text available
Maximum vertical force production (Fvert) is an integral measure of flight performance that generally scales with size. Numerous methods of measuring Fvert and body size are accessible to entomologists, but we do not know whether method selection affects inter- and intraspecific comparisons of Fvert-size scaling. We compared two common techniques f...
Article
Professional organizations in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) can use demographic data to quantify recruitment and retention (R&R) of underrepresented groups within their memberships. However, variation in the types of demographic data collected can influence the targeting and perceived impacts of R&R efforts - e.g., giving...
Article
Full-text available
Bees flying through natural landscapes frequently encounter physical challenges, such as wind and cluttered vegetation, but the influence of these factors on flight performance remains unknown. We analyzed 548 videos of wild-caught honeybees (Apis mellifera) flying through an enclosure containing a field of vertical obstacles that bees could choose...
Article
Professional organizations in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) can use demographic data to quantify recruitment and retention (R&R) of underrepresented groups within their memberships. However, variation in the types of demographic data collected can influence the targeting and perceived impacts of R&R efforts - e.g., giving...
Preprint
Maximum vertical force production (Fvert) is an integral measure of flight performance that generally scales with size. Numerous methods of measuring Fvert and body size exist, but few studies have compared how these methods affect the conclusions of scaling analyses. We compared two common techniques for measuring Fvert in bumblebees (Bombus impat...
Article
Macroalgae are ecologically important organisms that often inhabit locations with physically challenging water motion. The biomechanical traits that permit their survival in these conditions have been of interest to biologists and engineers alike, but logistical and technical challenges of conducting investigations in macroalgal habitats have often...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bees flying through natural landscapes encounter physical challenges, such as wind and cluttered vegetation. The influence of these factors on the flight performance of bees remains unknown. We analyzed 548 videos of wild-caught honeybees ( Apis mellifera ) flying through an enclosure containing a field of vertical obstacles that bees could fly wit...
Article
Herbivores can drastically alter the morphology of macroalgae by directly consuming tissue and by inflicting structural wounds. Wounds can result in large amounts of tissue breaking away from macroalgae, amplifying the damage initially caused by herbivores. Herbivores that commonly wound macroalgae often occur over only a portion of a macro-alga's...
Article
Premise: The resistance of macroalgae to hydrodynamic forces imposed by ambient water motion depends in part on the mechanical properties of their tissues. In wave-swept habitats, tissues are stretched (strained) at different rates as hydrodynamic forces change. Previous studies of mechanical properties of macroalgal tissues have used either a sin...
Article
"We assessed diversity-focused programming at 29 major biology conferences from 2010 to 2019, noting events tailored to three underrepresented and marginalized groups in biology: women, ethnic and racial minority groups, and the LGBTQ+ community (see Supplementary Information for further methods). Since 2010, diversity-focused events have become mo...
Article
Bees often forage in habitats with cluttered vegetation and unpredictable winds. Navigating obstacles in wind presents a challenge that may be exacerbated by wind-induced motions of vegetation. Although wind-blown vegetation is common in natural habitats, we know little about how bees’ strategies for flying through clutter are affected by obstacle...
Article
Full-text available
Kelp are ecologically important in wave-swept habitats because their thalli provide food and habitat to many other organisms. Fronds of kelp thalli can be broken off by hydrodynamic forces that exceed frond strength, especially if the fronds are weakened by wounds inflicted by herbivores. Previous studies hypothesized that breaking benefits some ke...
Article
Full-text available
Water motion in coastal areas can produce hydrodynamic forces that damage or dislodge benthic macroalgae if the tissues of macroalgae are not sufficiently strong. Some macroalgae vary their morphology and strength in response to ambient water motion, but little is known of how morphology and strength of macroalgae change relative to one another acr...
Article
Mussels are ecologically important organisms that can survive in subtidal and intertidal zones where they experience thermal stress. We know little about how mussels from different tidal habitats respond to thermal stress. We used the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis from separate subtidal and intertidal populations to test whether heart rate and i...
Article
Full-text available
Synopsis Post-doctoral training is a critical career stage for researchers in the life sciences, yet interviewing for a post-doctoral position is largely an unregulated process. Without regulation, interviews are susceptible to unconscious biases that may lead to discrimination against certain demographic groups (e.g., women and minorities). Using...
Article
Many seaweeds have buoyant gas-filled bladders (pneumatocysts) that hold fronds upright in the water column and enhance their access to light for photosynthesis. However, ambient water currents bend flexible seaweeds, pushing fronds closer to the substratum where light is lower, so the hydrodynamic drag on pneumatocysts may counteract their buoyanc...
Article
Full-text available
In nature, plants regularly interact with herbivores and with wind. Herbivores can wound and alter the structure of plants, whereas wind can exert aerodynamic forces that cause the plants to flutter or sway. While herbivory has many negative consequences for plants, fluttering in wind can be beneficial for plants by facilitating gas exchange and lo...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The goals of this project are to examine institutional practices that impede diversity, equity, and inclusivity in STEM and to identify feasible solutions to those problematic practices.
Project
The project's goal is to use principles of biomechanics to understand how the ecology and performance of organisms are affected by rapid, turbulent fluid flow - whether that fluid is water or air. Model organisms that I have used, or am currently using, are: the Tulip Tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus, Mytilaster minimus) and limpets (Cellana grata), and pollinating insects (Hymenoptera).
Project
Marine scientists collaborating to understand changes in biodiversity of coastal ecosystems of the American continent, developing best-practices for rocky shore and sandy beach monitoring at large spatial scales. Follow more updates on our website (https://marinebon.github.io/p2p/) and Twitter & Instagram (@mbonpoletopole)!