Niall G Clancy

Niall G Clancy
University of Wyoming | UW · Department of Zoology and Physiology

Master of Science

About

13
Publications
2,318
Reads
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55
Citations
Introduction
I work to conserve freshwater biodiversity in a way that benefits not just economically valuable species, but nongame species too. I work with federal, state, and NGO partners, primarily in Montana and Wyoming, on projects to prepare species for climate change and evaluate restoration practices. I also study freshwater food webs with particular interest in fishes. My current projects can be viewed at www.niallclancy.org
Additional affiliations
May 2021 - present
University of Wyoming
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2020 - December 2021
Montana Department of Fish Wildlife & Parks
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • I worked in a collaborative position with Montana FWP and Utah State University to A) determine climate refugia for Montana's native fishes, and B) aid research efforts in the Flathead River basin.
January 2018 - December 2019
Utah State University
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
January 2017 - December 2019
Utah State University
Field of study
  • Aquatic Ecology
August 2013 - May 2017
Montana State University
Field of study
  • Fish & Wildlife Ecology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Research on fishes sometimes requires that individual fish be captured and subjected to invasive procedures multiple times over a relatively short time span. Electrofishing is one of the most common techniques used to capture fish, and it is known to cause injury to fish under certain circumstances. We evaluated the relationship of growth rates in...
Article
Full-text available
Nonnative fish eradication via the piscicide rotenone is an effective tool for fisheries management and conservation of native species. However, the long-term effects on non-target organisms, including benthic invertebrates and zooplankton in alpine lakes, are under-studied and are poorly understood. As part of a landscape-scale native fish conserv...
Article
Full-text available
Stream habitat changes affecting primary consumers often indirectly impact secondary consumers such as fishes. Blooms of the benthic algae Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) are known to affect stream macroinvertebrates, but the potential indirect trophic impacts on fish consumers are poorly understood. In streams of the Kootenai River basin, we quant...
Article
Full-text available
The spread of non-native fish species is a common problem in lakes and streams worldwide. Species that establish viable populations in a new environment can seriously deplete populations of native species and desired sportfishes. In some instances, extirpation of a native species has occurred. In western North America, the most common avenue by whi...
Article
Full-text available
Crucial to the successful conservation of endangered species is the overlap of their ranges with protected areas. We analyzed protected areas in the continental USA to assess the extent to which they covered the ranges of endangered tetrapods. We show that in 80% of ecoregions, protected areas offer equal (25%) or worse (55%) protection for species...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Montana Chapter of the American Fisheries Society report on species of concern.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Stream habitat changes that affect primary consumers often indirectly impact secondary consumers such as fishes. Blooms of the benthic algae Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) represent one such habitat change known to affect stream macroinvertebrates. However, the potential indirect trophic impacts on fish consumers via modifications to their diet ar...
Thesis
Full-text available
Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo) is a nuisance algae that can cover entire streambeds under certain environmental conditions. Numerous studies have shown that it changes the composition of stream invertebrates. Fishes in many headwaters are known to feed almost exclusively on invertebrates. Thus, there is concern changes to the amount or type of inv...
Article
Full-text available
Illegal fish introductions create some of the most challenging problems for resource managers because of their potential to harm existing recreational fisheries and their impact on species of conservation concern. Determining the origin of a suspected illegal fish introduction can aid managers in preventing the colonization and subsequent ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
Native fish populations have continued to decline worldwide despite advances in management practices. As such, new approaches are needed to complement the old. In many flowing and standing waters, larval amphibians are the dominant vertebrate taxa. This can be important to fisheries due to amphibians’ ability to influence macroinvertebrate communit...
Article
Full-text available
The tick-borne flaviviruses (TBFV) occur worldwide and the tick-borne encephalitis virus members of the group (TBEV) often cause severe, debilitating neurological disease in humans. Although the primary route of infection is through the bite of an infected tick, alimentary infection through the consumption of TBEV-contaminated dairy products is als...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
A multi-faceted conservation project to determine likely areas of persistence (refugia) for multiple stream-dwelling species: game and nongame fishes; amphibians; and invertebrates. Find more at niallclancy.org/refugia