Neville S. Barrett

Neville S. Barrett
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

About

179
Publications
58,246
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9,562
Citations
Citations since 2016
63 Research Items
6350 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
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Publications

Publications (179)
Article
Warming seas, marine heatwaves, and habitat degradation are increasingly widespread phenomena affecting marine biodiversity, yet our understanding of their broader impacts is largely derived from collective insights from independent localized studies. Insufficient systematic broadscale monitoring limits our understanding of the true extent of these...
Article
Multi-decadal datasets for endangered species that track both populations and performance of management interventions are rare. One such dataset is for the critically endangered Spotted handfish, a species which has been used as a conservation model for the most endangered of the marine bony fish families the Brachionichthyidae. We assessed a 23-ye...
Article
Full-text available
Image-based surveys of the marine benthos are being increasingly adopted as a monitoring tool for habitats and biota, particularly in mesophotic depths (~30-150 m) which are technically difficult to survey. Many modern tools for these surveys, such as remotely operated vehicles and autonomous underwater vehicles, can capture thousands of images in...
Article
Effective prioritisation of research and conservation action for threatened species requires understanding the relative importance of the various pressures they face. This can be difficult for rare, cryptic, and data-deficient species, particularly when drivers of population decline are complex and indirectly impact one another. We developed a risk...
Article
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Predatory fishes on coral reefs continue to decline globally despite playing key roles in ecosystem functioning. Remote atolls and platform reefs provide potential refugia for predator populations, but quantitative information on their spatial distribution is required to establish accurate baselines for ongoing monitoring and conservation managemen...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change driven extreme events such as marine heatwaves (MHWs) can have dramatic impacts on ecosystems, with thermal stress often resulting in localised die-offs and visible signs of impacts such as bleaching of organisms. Such impacts are reported widely in shallower ecosystems but are less studied on deeper mesophotic ecosystems (MEs) where...
Article
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The redistribution of marine ecosystem engineers in response to changing climate is restructuring endemic benthic communities globally. Therefore, developing and implementing efficient monitoring programs across the complete depth range of these marine ecosystem engineers is often an urgent management priority. Traditionally, many monitoring progra...
Article
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Marine fisheries in coastal ecosystems in many areas of the world have historically removed large-bodied individuals, potentially impairing ecosystem functioning and the long-term sustainability of fish populations. Reporting on size-based indicators that link to food-web structure can contribute to ecosystem-based management, but the application o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents preliminary results of a collaborative seabed mapping and baseline environmental survey (GA4848) of Elizabeth and Middleton Reefs, located within the Lord Howe Marine Park (Temperate East Network). Data acquisition was undertaken in February 2020 by Geoscience Australia, the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (Universit...
Article
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Marine reserves are a key tool for the conservation of marine biodiversity, yet only ~2.5% of the world's oceans are protected. The integration of marine reserves into connected networks representing all habitats has been encouraged by international agreements, yet the benefits of this design has not been tested empirically. Australia has one of th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
An analysis of changes in mesophotic reef communities in the South east Australian Marine Park (AMP) network using benthic imagery collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV).
Article
Many marine fish populations have declined due to the individual or cumulative impacts of increasing water temperatures, ocean acidification, overfishing and other human-induced impacts such as land run-off, dredging and habitat alteration. Some solutions may be offered by ecosystem-based fisheries and conservation management. However, understandin...
Article
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Accurate descriptions of size structure are important for adaptive management of marine fish populations subject to anthropogenic and environmental pressures. This requires monitoring programs that can measure the length of enough individuals within each focal fish population. This study assessed the number of length measurements required to accura...
Chapter
Handfishes are small, benthic marine fishes found only in south-eastern Australia. Half of the 14 known species are categorized as threatened (facing a high risk of extinction) on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species. Of the remaining species, five are considered Data Deficient, one is listed as Extinc...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Hunter Marine Park located in the Temperate East Marine Parks Network is situated between Port Stephens and Saltwater Point near Taree in New South Wales. The Hunter Marine Park is one of the few Australian Marine Parks that borders a state managed marine park. It borders the Port Stephens – Great Lakes Marine Park and thus extends the benefit...
Article
Marine species live out-of-sight, consequently geographic range, population size and long-term trends are extremely difficult to characterise for accurate conservation status assessments. Detection challenges have precluded listing of marine bony fishes as Extinct on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List, until now (Mar...
Article
Reef Life Survey (RLS) provides a new model for ecological monitoring through training experienced recreational divers in underwater visual census methods to the level of skilled scientists. Detail produced is similar to that of programs with professional scientific teams, at low cost to allow global coverage. RLS differs from most other citizen sc...
Article
Full-text available
1. Baited remote underwater stereo‐video systems (stereo‐BRUVs) are a popular tool to sample demersal fish assemblages and gather data on their relative abundance and body‐size structure in a robust, cost‐effective, and non‐invasive manner. Given the rapid uptake of the method, subtle differences have emerged in the way stereo‐BRUVs are deployed an...
Article
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Global climate change is driving the redistribution of marine species and thereby potentially restructuring endemic communities. Understanding how localised conservation measures such as protection from additional human pressures can confer resilience to ecosystems is therefore an important area of research. Here, we examine the resilience of a no-...
Article
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Abstract The relative roles of top‐down (consumer‐driven) and bottom‐up (resource‐driven) forcing in exploited marine ecosystems have been much debated. Examples from a variety of marine systems of exploitation‐induced, top‐down trophic forcing have led to a general view that human‐induced predator perturbations can disrupt entire marine food webs,...
Article
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Ectotherms generally shrink under experimental warming, but whether this pattern extends to wild populations is uncertain. We analysed ten million visual survey records, spanning the Australian continent and multiple decades and comprising the most common coastal reef fishes (335 species). We found that temperature indeed drives spatial and tempora...
Article
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The Evidence Based Decision Making (EBDM) paradigm encourages managers to base their decisions on the strongest available evidence, but it has been criticized for placing too much emphasis on the choice of study design method without considering the types of questions that are being addressed as well as other relevant factors such as how well a stu...
Article
Many sampling techniques rely on taking measurements along a transect; an example is underwater imagery from towed platforms used for marine ecological studies. Despite transect‐based sampling being commonly used, methods to generate randomised survey designs have not hitherto been developed. We develop methods to generate random transect designs,...
Article
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Here we outline the genesis of Seamap Australia, which integrates spatial data of the seabed of Australia’s continental shelf (0–200 m depth) from multiple sources to provide a single national map layer of marine habitat. It is underpinned by a hierarchical classification scheme with registered vocabulary, enabling presentation of nationally consis...
Article
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Restricting human activities through Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) is assumed to create more resilient biological communities with a greater capacity to resist and recover following climate events. Here we review the evidence linking protection from local pressures (e.g., fishing and habitat destruction) with increased resilience. Despite strong th...
Article
The Derwent River seastar, ‘Marginaster’ littoralis (Echinodermata: Asteroidea), has been assessed as critically endangered owing to its highly restricted range within one estuary in Tasmania, Australia. However, there have been concerns about the validity and status of the species. Here, we use non-invasive X-ray computed tomography to review the...
Article
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One of the main challenges in assessing marine biodiversity is the lack of consistent approaches to monitor it. This threatens to undermine ocean best practice in marine monitoring, as it impedes a reduction in the bias and variance of sampled data and restricts the confidence in the advice that can be given. In particular, there is potential for c...
Article
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Anthropogenic activities and greater demands for marine natural resources has led to increases in the spatial extent and duration of pressures on marine ecosystems. Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) offer a robust survey tool for quantifying these pressures and tracking the success of management intervention while at a range of depths, including th...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic activities and greater demands for marine natural resources has led to increases in the spatial extent and duration of pressures on marine ecosystems. Remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) offer a robust survey tool for quantifying these pressures and tracking the success of management intervention while at a range of depths, including th...
Article
Seamap Australia integrates seafloor maps with information on plant and animal habitats, environmental stressors, and resource management to create a first-of-its-kind resource.
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Competition for space between corals and macroalgae represents a key threatening process for coral reefs, yet the influence of climate change on this competitive interaction is poorly understood, particularly at the poleward margins of coral distribution. Here we describe the discovery of Australia’s southernmost hermatypic corals and explore novel...
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The effects of climate-driven ocean change on reef habitat-forming species are diverse1,2 and can be deleterious to the structure and functioning of seafloor communities3–5. Although responses of shallow coral- or seaweed-based reef communities to environmental changes are a focus of ecological research in the coastal zone1,4–6, the ecology of habi...
Article
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Efficient monitoring of organisms is at the foundation of protected area and biodiversity management. Such monitoring programs are based on a systematically selected set of survey locations that, while able to track trends at those locations through time, lack inference for the overall region being “monitored”. Advances in spatially-balanced sampli...
Article
• Monitoring the impacts of pressures, such as climate change, on marine benthic ecosystems is of high conservation priority. Novel imaging technologies, such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), and towed systems, now give researchers the ability to monitor benthic ecosystems over large spatial and temporal...
Article
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The critically endangered spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus) is restricted to a limited number of locations in south-eastern Tasmania, Australia. As is often the case for rare species, conducting statistically adequate surveys for B. hirsutus can be costly and time consuming due to the low probability of encountering individuals. For the f...
Article
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Collecting data on unlicensed open‐access coastal activities, such as some types of recreational fishing, has often relied on telephone interviews selected from landline directories. However, this approach is becoming obsolete due to changes in communication technology such as a switch to unlisted mobile phones. Other methods, such as boat ramp int...
Article
The number of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) has increased globally as concerns over the impact that human activities are having on the world’s oceans have also increased. Monitoring is a key requirement to determine if MPAs are meeting their objectives. However, many recently declared MPA’s are large, offshore, or form part of an expansive network...
Book
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Australia has one of the world’s largest marine estates that includes many vulnerable habitats and a high biodiversity, with many endemic species crossing a wide latitudinal range. The marine estate is used by a variety of industries including fishing, oil & gas, and shipping, in addition to traditional, cultural, scientific and recreational uses....
Technical Report
Full-text available
The report provides an updated description of reef-affiliated seabed biota in many of the Australian Marine Parks (AMPs) within the Temperate east, South-east and South-west marine planning regions. The report also presents the mapping coverage of all AMPs by Lucieer et al. (2016).
Article
Marine reef habitats are typically defined subjectively. We provide a continental-scale assessment of dominant reef habitats through analysis of macroalgae and sessile animal taxa at sites distributed around Australia. Relationships between reef habitats and environmental and anthropogenic factors are assessed, and potential changes in the future d...
Article
Shifts in the abundance and location of species are restructuring life on the Earth, presenting the need to build resilience into our natural systems. Here, we tested if protection from fishing promotes community resilience in temperate reef communities undergoing rapid warming in Tasmania. Regardless of protection status, we detected a signature o...
Article
Imagery collected from Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) provides a novel means of monitoring changes in benthic ecosystems over large spatial scales and depth ranges. However, for many benthic ecosystems there is little baseline data to quantify temporal and spatial variance for key indicator species. This information is crucial for isolating...
Article
A robust scientific conclusion is the result of a rigorous scientific process. In observational ecology, this process involves making inferences about a population from a sample. The sample is crucial, and is the result of implementing a survey design. A good survey design ensures that the data from the survey is capable of answering the research q...
Article
Full-text available
Reporting progress against targets for international biodiversity agreements is hindered by a shortage of suitable biodiversity data. We describe a cost-effective system involving Reef Life Survey citizen scientists in the systematic collection of quantitative data covering multiple phyla that can underpin numerous marine biodiversity indicators at...
Data
Supplementary data are available at BIOSCI online.
Article
Macroalgae underpin most temperate inshore ecosystems, but increasing macroalgal loss, fragmentation and range contractions are eroding connectivity among populations. Understanding loss, and predicting the likelihood of recovery, is dependent on knowledge of population connectivity and how it is mediated by variability in local seascapes. Although...
Article
Full-text available
Scientific Data 2:150057 doi: 10.1038/sdata.2015.57 (2015); Published 27 Oct 2015; Updated 20 Dec 2016 The authors regret that Ezequiel Marzinelli was omitted in error from the author list of the original version of this Data Descriptor.
Article
Significance Kelp forests support diverse and productive ecological communities throughout temperate and arctic regions worldwide, providing numerous ecosystem services to humans. Literature suggests that kelp forests are increasingly threatened by a variety of human impacts, including climate change, overfishing, and direct harvest. We provide the...
Article
Benthic imagery is an effective tool for quantitative description of ecologically and economically important benthic habitats and biota. The recent development of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) allows surveying of spatial scales that were previously unfeasible. However, an AUV collects a large number of images, the scoring of which is time a...
Article
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Seafloor habitats on continental shelf margins are increasingly being the subject of worldwide conservation efforts to protect them from human activities due to their biological and economic value. Quantitative data on the epibenthic taxa which contributes to the biodiversity value of these continental shelf margins is vital for the effectiveness o...
Article
Cool-temperate reef fish assemblages are often poorly described below 20 m because of depth limitations of conventional diver-based visual census. The recent development of baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVs) provide an alternative quantitative sampling method. Despite being used in warmer temperate and tropical waters and cool-temperate...
Article
The Endangered Maugean skate Zearaja maugeana is a relic species restricted to two isolated estuaries, Bathurst Harbour and Macquarie Harbour, in south-western Tasmania, Australia. Over a 1-year period, dive, tagging and net surveys provided information on the biology and ecology of this species. In all, 96 Maugean skates were caught during five tr...
Article
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Deep reef assemblages in south-eastern Australia are poorly described, and have been surveyed by only a few studies conducted over small spatial scales. Here, we characterize the composition of deep (∼30?90 m depth) sessile invertebrate communities from sub-tropical (27° S) to temperate eastern Australia (43° S). We estimated the cover of 51 presel...
Article
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A critical assumption underlying projections of biodiversity change associated with global warming is that ecological communities comprise balanced mixes of warm-affinity and cool-affinity species which, on average, approximate local environmental temperatures. Nevertheless, here we find that most shallow water marine species occupy broad thermal d...
Article
Biodiversity hotspots may result from the retention of lineages through past climatic changes, local diversification of lineages or the accumulation of lineages derived from elsewhere. Different phylogeographic structuring is anticipated for taxa derived under these scenarios. Here we examine phylogeographic variation in four macroalgae that are do...
Article
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Imagery collected by still and video cameras is an increasingly important tool for minimal impact, repeatable observations in the marine environment. Data generated from imagery includes identification, annotation and quantification of biological subjects and environmental features within an image. To be long-lived and useful beyond their project-s...
Article
Full-text available
This Australian benthic data set (BENTHOZ-2015) consists of an expert-annotated set of georeferenced benthic images and associated sensor data, captured by an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) around Australia. This type of data is of interest to marine scientists studying benthic habitats and organisms. AUVs collect georeferenced images over an...
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The recently declared Australian Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) Network covers a total of 3.1 million km2 of continental shelf, slope, and abyssal habitat. Managing and conserving the biodiversity values within this network requires knowledge of the physical and biological assets that lie within its boundaries. Unfortunately very little is known...
Article
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Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) offer a unique opportunity to test the assumption that fishing pressure affects some trophic groups more than others. Removal of larger predators through fishing is often suggested to have positive flow-on effects for some lower trophic groups, in which case protection from fishing should result in suppression of lower...