Nevena Andric Tomasevic

Nevena Andric Tomasevic
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | KIT · Institute of Applied Geosciences

PhD

About

19
Publications
6,593
Reads
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131
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
125 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
University of Tuebingen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2014 - October 2017
Utrecht University
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2011 - July 2018
University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mining and Geology
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
March 2014 - October 2017
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Tectonics
October 2010 - September 2012
University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mining and Geology
Field of study
  • Geology
October 2007 - September 2010
University of Belgrade, Faculty of Mining and Geology
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
The Patagonian Andes have been used to illustrate the dependency of major topographic changes in response to glacial erosion processes dominating over tectonic deformation and uplift. Here, we investigate tectonic and glacial contributors to the erosion history and evolution of topography in the Patagonian Andes at 46.5° S. We present 33 new apatit...
Article
Full-text available
Although many different mechanisms for subduction initiation have been proposed, only few of them are viable in terms of consistency with observations and reproducibility in numerical experiments. In particular, it has recently been demonstrated that intra‐oceanic subduction triggered by an upwelling mantle plume could greatly contribute to the ons...
Article
Lacustrine strata record long-term variations in climatic and tectonic perturbations during orogen evolution. Here we use the sedimentological record of the early to middle Miocene intramontane lacustrine Pranjani Basin (Serbia) to study tectonic and climatic variations during the evolution of the Dinaridic orogen. Our study focuses on a Mg-clay-be...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Glacial erosion is hypothesized to be a major control on the topographic evolution of mountain belts. Previous studies often used the Southern Patagonian Andes to illustrate the dominant role of glacial erosion on topographic variations. However, contemporaneously with glacial periods this region has been affected by the subduction of oceanic sprea...
Article
The Sarajevo-Zenica Basin of Bosnia-Herzegovina was part of the Dinaride Lake System, a large network of Miocene long-lived freshwater basins in southeastern Europe. The basin contains a thick sedimentary succession of carbonates, coals and mixed siliciclastic deposits that reflects the paleoclimatic and tectonic evolution of the region. In this st...
Article
Understanding the link between sedimentation and fault kinematics is important for reconstructing the evolution of sedimentary basins. The relationship between the mechanics of creating accommodation space and the sediment supply in asymmetric extensional basins is critical for quantifying their syn- and post-rift evolution, but is not yet well und...
Article
The relationship between magma generation and the tectonic evolution of orogens during subduction and subsequent collision requires self-consistent numerical modelling approaches predicting volumes and compositions of the produced magmatic rocks. Here, we use a 2D magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling procedure to analyse rapid subduction o...
Article
The coupled tectonic and depositional history of extensional basins is usually described in terms of stratigraphic sequences linked with the activity of normal faults. This depositional-kinematic interplay is less understood in basins bounded by major extensional detachments or normal fault systems associated with significant exhumation of footwall...
Article
Full-text available
The City of Belgrade is the largest market for aggregates in Serbia but the production of natural aggregates is rather small, around five percent of total consumption. This reflects the geology of the City of Belgrade territory, dominated by Neogene and Quaternary sedimentary rocks. The production of crushed rock and sand and gravel on the territor...
Article
Full-text available
The Ibar Basin was formed during Miocene large scale extension in the NE Dinaride segment of the Alpine- Carpathian-Dinaride system. The Miocene extension led to exhumation of deep seated core-complexes (e.g. Studenica and Kopaonik core-complex) as well as to the formation of extensional basins in the hanging wall (Ibar Basin). Sediments of the Iba...
Article
Full-text available
The Jarando basin, located in the internal Dinarides, formed in the course of the Miocene extension affecting the whole Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaride system (Schmid et al., 2008). In the study area Miocene extension led to the formation of a core-complex in the Kopaonik area (Schefer et al., 2011) with the Jarando basin located in the hanging wall of...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
Paratethys was a large epicontinental sea, stretching from Germany to China at the beginning of the Oligocene (~34 Myr ago), that progressively retreated by a complex combination of basin infill, glacio-eustatic sea-level lowering and tectonic uplift to its present-day remnants: Black Sea, Caspian Sea and Aral Lake. The influence of Paratethys on global change is still a great unknown, mainly through lack of relevant studies in this terra incognita, although model studies suggest a major effect of sea retreat on climate and environment. The team in this project aims to comprehend the causes of the extreme environmental changes that occurred in Central Eurasia. High-resolution geochronology together with integrated stratigraphy and geochemical proxies (deuterium, strontium, neodymium) are critical to unravel internal (geodynamics, tectonic uplift) from external (climate, glacio-eustatic sea-level change) forcing factors and to resolve the effects of Paratethys restriction (regional climate perturbations, biotic crises, aridification). Three time slices exist when progressive sea retreat and variations in interbasinal connectivity generated extreme environmental changes: 1) The birth of Paratethys (~34 Ma), resulting in deposition of anoxic shales during a complex combination of tectonic uplift and global cooling. 2) Its midlife crisis in the middle Miocene (~14-11 Ma) when gateway restriction created massive salt deposits during the middle Miocene climate transition. 3) The demise of Paratethys (~9-4 Ma), transforming open marine environments into lacustrine deltaic systems, and leading to alternating phases of desiccation and flooding. Updating the chronostratigraphic framework means that we need to critically revise existing (bio)stratigraphic data according to the newest standards, and, above all, we need to look and communicate beyond borders to correlate critical Paratethys events. The new stratigraphic insights can be used for numerical modeling studies. Moreover, fundamental rock magnetic studies are needed to standardize microfossil iron sulphide (greigite) techniques, intended to revolutionize magnetostratigraphic dating in brackish-lacustrine paleoenvironments. This multi-disciplinary approach provides the only way to attain a comprehensive system view on long-term Paratethys evolution.
Archived project
The main aim of the project is to understand and quantify the combined kinematic, sedimentary and magmatic evolution of asymmetric extensional back-arc systems.