Neus Campanyà-Llovet

Neus Campanyà-Llovet
University of the Azores | UAc · Institute of Marine Research - IMAR

Marine ecologist

About

17
Publications
2,665
Reads
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110
Citations
Introduction
I am a benthic ecologist with an interest in extreme environments, particularly the deep sea. By using a trait-based approach I aim to better understand the ecology of seamounts and help prioritize management, conservation, and restoration strategies. Over my PhD I published various works on the biodiversity and trophic diversity of submarine canyons and their relationship to the quality of the food received. I also have an interest on community shifts observed in long-term studies.
Additional affiliations
January 2013 - August 2018
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Position
  • PhD
January 2012 - December 2012
SeaStar Survey
Position
  • Researcher
Education
January 2013 - March 2018
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Field of study
  • Deep-sea ecology (food webs)
October 2010 - October 2011
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Oceanography (Marine biolgy)
September 2004 - June 2010
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
In the Barents Sea, extensive aggregations of sponges are known to occur, especially in the southwestern portion dominated by large species of Geodia spp. The distribution of deep-sea sponge grounds, considered vulnerable marine ecosystems, often coincides with high fishing efforts targeting demersal fish species and benthic invertebrates using bot...
Article
Long-term interannual variations in the benthic community structure are well-known from abyssal plains in the North Atlantic and North Pacific, where rapid responses to changes in the environment by first-order opportunists modify overall species composition. To increase our knowledge of the long-term variations of deep-sea benthic communities in t...
Presentation
Full-text available
Community ecology based on biological and/or functional traits rather than taxonomic criteria informs general ecological patterns through the study of ecological niches, function, and resistance and resilience to perturbations. There are no repositories for diverse species traits from non-chemosynthetic deep-sea ridges and associated seamounts, whe...
Presentation
Functional diversity in the Azores. FUN Azores porject.
Presentation
Full-text available
Community ecology based on biological and/or functional traits rather than taxonomic criteria informs general ecological patterns through the study of ecological niches, function, and resistance and resilience to perturbations. There are no repositories for species traits from non-chemosynthetic deep-sea ridges and associated seamounts, where the i...
Article
In order to evaluate the influence of food quality on deep-sea macroinfaunal and mega-epifaunal communities, we deployed experimental food pulses at 890 m depth in Barkley Canyon, NE Pacific. Pulses of 2 microalgal species (i.e. Chaetoceros calcitrans and Nannochloropsis oculata) differed in nitrogen, carotenoid, and lipid content (i.e. quality). A...
Poster
Full-text available
Bottom-up controls such as temperature, light and nutrient availability regulate marine food webs, including the abundance and distribution of valuable fisheries resources consumed by humans. By understanding linkages among plants-consumers-predators (food web) we can identify sensitive components and develop intuitive indicators of food web dynami...
Article
In order to assess the influence of organic matter patchiness on deep-sea biodiversity, we examined organic matter patchiness and macrofauna at small spatial scales (meters – 100 s of meters) in a chemosynthetic environment (Barkley methane hydrates, British Columbia continental slope, ~900 m depth). Specifically, we assessed quantity, quality, and...
Article
Increasing evidence points to greater temporal variation in deep-sea ecosystems than previously thought. In cold seeps, most available evidence focuses on successional stages of megafauna, with few studies on temporal variability in infaunal communities. We present a temporal study of infaunal communities and sedimentary organic matter characterist...
Presentation
Full-text available
We assessed the influence of patchiness in sediment organic matter on deep-sea macroinfaunal biodiversity and trophic diversity in space and time in a chemosynthetic environment (Barkley Hydrates, British Columbia, ~900 m depth). We measured food quantity, quality, and sources together with the associated infaunal community and feeding guild compos...
Article
The highly heterogeneous nature of submarine canyon physical landscapes can influence organic matter spatial distribution and thus benthic community and food web structure. We therefore studied patterns in quantity and quality (i.e., nutritional value for benthic organisms) of sediment and bottom-water particulate organic matter and their influence...
Article
Current knowledge on the role of food for benthic communities and associated food webs focuses on quantity of available organic matter; however, the few studies that specifically address food quality show significant potential influences on food web and community structure. We examine current understanding of food quality, and consider its contribu...
Article
Full-text available
Echinoderms are the dominant megafaunal taxa in Antarctic and Subantarctic waters in terms of abundance and diversity, having a predominant role in structuring communities. The current study presents new data on the asteroids, holothuroids, and ophiuroids collected in seven scientific campaigns (1995–2012) from Bouvet Is., South Shetland Is., and t...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I want to analyse the diets of infaunal invertebrates from a deep-sea methane hydrates site. The organisms had been preserved in 10 % formalin and then transferred to 70 % ethanol for about 4 years now. I know this preservation method affects the carbon stable isotopic signature and, depending on the organisms, the nitrogen stable isotopic signature too. But I'm having some trouble finding information on the literature about the effects of preservation on sulfur stable isotopes.
Thanks!

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
FUN AZORES is a project aimed at understanding the relationship between species and functional (i.e., ecological and biological characteristics or traits) diversity in Azorean seamounts at Mid Atlantic Ridge, which are unique and resourceful ecosystems (i.e., fish stocks and minerals). By using a trait-based approach on a wide range of taxonomic groups (from algae to cetaceans, corals, etc.) we can better understand the ecosystem's resistance and resilience to the various environmental and anthropogenic threats they face.
Project
Despite multiple drivers of ocean change, few studies have addressed the role of food quality in structuring deep-sea benthic communities and food webs, and therefore its role in ecosystem processes (functioning). Based on a review of published data, I showed that food quality (i.e., nitrogen, pigment, lipid, carbohydrate, protein content) alters marine trophic guild composition, and thus food web structure, differently. In sampling heterogeneous submarine canyon and chemosynthetic ecosystems as model environments for food web and biodiversity studies, I found that patchy food quality distribution in Barkley submarine canyon influenced macroinfaunal community structure more strongly at smaller spatial scales (10’s of m), whereas major stressors (i.e., oxygen/depth) acted over larger scales (100’s of m). Increased food patchiness at a hydrate outcrop site (Barkley Hydrates), compared to sites located 20 and 600 m away, was related to increased macroinfaunal trophic diversity. Food quality explained substantial variation (~ 33 %) in macroinfaunal community structure, but H2S toxicity likely explained much of the remaining variation. Increasing spatial resolution of analysis (i.e., ≤ 10 m) indicated a 9-15 m influence radius around the most methane-active site (i.e., more depleted δ13C, indicative of chemosynthesis). Macroinfaunal total abundance at Barkley Hydrates tracked temporal changes in chemosynthetic organic matter, however, some taxa (i.e., Ampharetidae) apparently matched recruitment to phytodetrital pulses, much like the background community. An in situ enrichment experiment demonstrated modest differences in infaunal community species and functional trait composition in food patches enriched with either Chaetoceros calcitrans (a diatom) or Nannochloropsis oculata (a lipid rich eustygmatal alga). Megaepifaunal visits to the enrichment patches increased in N. oculata over the first two weeks of the experiment, perhaps responding to increased abundance of potential infaunal prey. This research demonstrates a structuring role for food quality both in benthic communities and in food webs, with different effects on organisms of different sizes (e.g., macrofauna and megafauna).