Nele Põldvere

Nele Põldvere
University of Oslo · Department of Literature, Area Studies and European Languages

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
3,107
Reads
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52
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
52 Citations
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Introduction
My research follows two main directions in English Linguistics: the language of fake news and spoken language. On the one hand, I investigate differences in metaphorical and evaluative language use across fake and real news to contribute to a more accurate and faster detection of mis/disinformation in online news items. On the other hand, I am interested in spoken language and the combination of social motivations and cognitive mechanisms of speech production, comprehension and change.
Additional affiliations
September 2021 - present
Lund University
Position
  • PhD supervisor
Description
  • I co-supervise Eleni Seitanidi's project on Aspects of Spoken Dialogue
August 2020 - December 2020
Lund University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Personal website: https://www.sol.lu.se/en/person/NelePoidvere
March 2020 - August 2020
Örebro University
Position
  • BA supervisor
Description
  • I supervised five Bachelor degree projects in an English Language Education programme on teaching speaking and listening skills in Swedish (upper) secondary schools, graded five other projects
Education
September 2014 - September 2019
Lund University
Field of study
  • English Linguistics
September 2011 - January 2014
Lund University
Field of study
  • English Linguistics
September 2009 - June 2010
University of Copenhagen
Field of study
  • Erasmus Programme in English Studies

Publications

Publications (14)
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis is concerned with spoken dialogue and the dynamic negotiation of meaning in English conversation. It serves two aims, one theoretical and the other practical. The theoretical aim is to further our understanding of the kinds of properties that influence the meaning of constructions in spoken dialogue and the role of underlying socio-cogn...
Article
Full-text available
The idea of this special issue on Spoken language in time and across time emerged at an international symposium on this topic that we organised at Lund University on 20 September 2019. The purpose of the symposium was to celebrate important past and present achievements of spoken language research as well as past and present corpora available for s...
Article
Full-text available
Dialogic resonance, when speakers reproduce constructions from prior turns, is a compelling type of coordination in everyday conversation. This study takes its starting point in resonance in stance-taking sequences with the aim to account for the interplay between intersubjective motivations and cognitive facilitation in resonance production. It an...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes and critically examines the challenging task of compiling The London-Lund Corpus 2 (LLC-2) from start to end, accounting for the methodological decisions made in each stage and highlighting the innovations. LLC-2 is a half-a-million-word corpus of contemporary spoken British English with recordings from 2014 to 2019. Its size...
Book
Full-text available
This Element is a contribution to a new generation of corpus pragmatics research by taking as its starting point the multifaceted nature of speech acts in conversation, and by adopting a mixed-methods approach. Through a unique combination of theoretical, qualitative, quantitative, and statistical approaches, it provides a detailed investigation of...
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to describe key challenges of preparing and releasing audio material for spoken data and to propose solutions to these challenges. We draw on our experience of compiling the new London-Lund Corpus 2 (LLC-2), where transcripts are released together with the audio files. However, making the audio material publicly available required...
Article
Full-text available
In the process of compiling a new corpus of contemporary spoken British English, the London-Lund Corpus 2, we hit upon a construction used in the conversations recorded that had not previously been dealt with in the literature, namely the reactive what-x construction. Prompted by this discovery, we carried out a detailed analysis of its properties...
Article
With data from two comparable corpora of spoken British English, the London-Lund Corpus and the new London-Lund Corpus 2, this study tracks the development of the reactive what-x construction half a century back in time. The study has two goals: (i) to describe the uses of the construction over time and (ii) to establish the motivations and mechani...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the dialogic functions of EXPANSION and CONTRACTION of first-person epistemic and evidential Complement-Taking Predicate (CTP) constructions, such as I think COMPLEMENT, I suppose COMPLEMENT and I know COMPLEMENT, in spoken discourse. It combines corpus and experimental methods (i) to investigate whether CTP constructions are us...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The overall aim of the project is to enable fake news detection systems to discover and flag potentially harmful fake news items in a more accurate, efficient and timely manner than offered by current state-of-the-art systems. By automating all and only the features of Fakespeak, the project team will enable the systems to detect and flag only deliberate disinformation, excluding, for example, (inadvertent) misinformation, satirical texts, parody, and texts reflecting a certain set of opinions. Thus, the project will take societal safety and security into consideration while at the same time guarding the freedom of speech. My main research objective within the project is to investigate differences in metaphorical language use across fake and real news in English. Metaphor is a powerful, yet subtle, way to shape public opinion and thought, and violence metaphors in particular may have real consequences on reasoning, as they can increase the tendency to polarise. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the frequency and nature of the metaphors used in fake news are different from those in real news. These differences will help us develop more accurate and faster deception detection systems in order to help curtail the spread of fake news. I am also involved in the investigation of evaluative differences between the two types of news and the development of fake news datasets.
Archived project
The project focusses on how people make use of language when they give advice in everyday conversation compared to half a century ago, and how advice is taken up by the recipient. Advice giving in different forms and shapes is pervasive in human encounters, in professional as well as in private contexts. However, since, as we all know, it is very easy to step on people’s toes, advice giving is a notoriously complex and sensitive undertaking. The way speakers express themselves is therefore of crucial importance. This project aims to break new ground by mapping out what speakers do when they give advice in authentic everyday conversation and to describe and explain the consequences that their choices may have in different situations and among different groups of speakers, and how these practices have changed over time. The data are from the London–Lund Corpora. The brand new London–Lund Corpus 2, in particular, is of crucial importance. This project has important implications for any area concerned with human communication, academic or otherwise.
Project
LLC–2 is a half-a-million-word corpus of spoken language with data recorded in 2014–2019 in the UK (primarily London) and Sweden with adult educated speakers of British English. On the one hand, the corpus is a resource for studying contemporary speech from a synchronic perspective and across different registers and groups of speakers. On the other hand, it is designed according to the same principles as the original London–Lund Corpus (LLC–1) with data from the 1950s–1980s. To this end, it facilitates principled comparisons across different time periods of English with roughly 50 years in between. The corpus design includes: face-to-face conversation, phone/CMC conversation (landline telephone calls in LLC–1), broadcast media, parliamentary proceedings, spontaneous commentary, legal proceedings and prepared speech.