Neil Thomas

Neil Thomas
Department of Parks and Wildlife | DPaW

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13
Publications
6,346
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257
Citations
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June 1985 - present

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
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European Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes) baiting with 1080 poison (sodium fluoroacetate) is undertaken in many Australian sites to reduce fox abundance and to protect vulnerable native species from predation. The longest continuous use of fox baiting for fauna conservation commenced in south-west Western Australia in the 1980s and includes baiting Dryandra...
Article
Full-text available
The control of foxes (Vulpes vulpes) is a key component of many fauna recovery programs in Australia. A question crucial to the success of these programs is how fox control influences feral cat abundance and subsequently affects predation upon native fauna. Historically, this question has been difficult to address because invasive predators are typ...
Article
Full-text available
The endemic Australian greater bilby (Macrotis lagotis) is a vulnerable and iconic species. It has declined significantly due to habitat loss, as well as competition and predation from introduced species. Conservation measures include a National Recovery Plan that incorporates several captive breeding programs. Two of these programs were establishe...
Article
Full-text available
The diet of foxes in two fragmented Wheatbelt reserves in southwest Western Australia, Dryandra Woodland (DW) and Tutanning Nature Reserve (TNR), was investigated. Fox baiting commenced in these reserves in the early 1980s and the trap success of woylies (Bettongia penicillata), a threatened species, increased significantly. Woylie capture rates we...
Article
Full-text available
Brush-tailed phascogales were potentially at risk from poisoning from a newly developed fox bait, Pro-bait. Before Pro-baits were used operationally their impact upon a population of phascogales was investigated. Seven radio-collared brush-tailed phascogales (Phascogale tapoatafa, undescribed subspecies) were monitored for nine weeks during and aft...
Article
Full-text available
The Western Shield fauna recovery program delivers fox (Vulpes vulpes) baits containing 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate) to approximately 3.4 million ha at least four times each year. Originally dried meat baits (DMB) produced by the Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia (DAFWA) were used but in 1998 the Department of Parks and Wildlife (...
Article
Full-text available
The effectiveness of fauna reintroduction programs has been limited by the availability of source animals and the lack of follow up monitoring to assess whether viable populations have been successfully established, particularly in terms of conserving genetic diversity. Here we present genetic assessment of the translocation of golden bandicoots (I...
Article
Full-text available
The greater bilby (Macrotis lagotis) is the sole remaining species of desert bandicoot on the Australian mainland. The mating system of this species remains poorly understood, due to the bilby's cryptic nature. We investigated the genetic mating system of the greater bilby in a five-year study of a semi-free-ranging captive population that simulate...
Article
Full-text available
Once widespread across western and southern Australia, wild populations of the western barred bandicoot (WBB) are now only found on Bernier and Dorre Islands, Western Australia. Conservation efforts to prevent the extinction of the WBB are presently hampered by a papillomatosis and carcinomatosis syndrome identified in captive and wild bandicoots,...
Chapter
Full-text available
At the time of European settlement in Australia, the distribution of the numbat extended across much of southern Australia. By 1985 only two small populations survived, at sites 160 km apart in the south-west of Western Australia. The decline of the numbat coincided largely, although not wholly, with the spread of the fox (Vulpes vulpes) from its p...
Chapter
Full-text available
Only two significant Myrmecobius fasciatus populations, at Dryandra and Perup, SW Western Australia, have survived the massive and widespread decline of the species. A programme of reintroduction has been in progress since 1985, first by translocation from the wild to an area close to the source location and then to other areas within the numbat's...

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