• Home
  • Neil Pakenham-Walsh
Neil Pakenham-Walsh

Neil Pakenham-Walsh
Global Healthcare Information Network · HIFA

MB,BS DCH DRCOG

About

41
Publications
6,434
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
857
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
January 2006 - May 2016
Independent Researcher
Position
  • Coordinator HIFA

Publications

Publications (41)
Preprint
BACKGROUND Health systems fighting the COVID-19 pandemic are also facing an additional challenge of addressing an infodemic, defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an “overabundance of information”. Healthcare Information for All (HIFA) is a multidisciplinary global campaign consisting of more than 20,000 members around the world committ...
Article
Background Healthcare Information for All (HIFA) is a multidisciplinary global campaign consisting of more than 20,000 members worldwide committed to improving the availability and use of health care information in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). During the COVID-19 pandemic, online HIFA forums saw a tremendous amount of discussion regard...
Article
Full-text available
The information that people need to protect and manage their own health and the health of those for whom they are responsible is a fundamental element of an effective people-centred healthcare system. Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) requires universal access to essential health information. While it was recently recognised by the World Me...
Article
Full-text available
Background We systematically reviewed the evidence on how primary healthcare workers obtain information during consultations to support decision-making for prescribing in low and lower middle-income countries. Methods We searched electronic databases, consulted the Healthcare Information For All network, hand searched reference lists, ran citation...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: There is a wide variety in prescribing by primary healthcare workers in low-income and middle-income countries. While there is much information available, both online and offline, there is variation in quality and relevance to different settings. Acting on incorrect or out-of-date information can lead to inappropriate prescribing and...
Article
Background: We systematically reviewed the evidence on how primary healthcare workers obtain information during consultations to support decision-making for prescribing in low and lower middle-income countries. Methods: We searched electronic databases, consulted the Healthcare Information For All network, hand searched reference lists, ran citati...
Poster
Full-text available
Objectives: HIFA (Healthcare Information For All - www.hifa.org/) is a global health movement working in collaboration with more than 300 other health and development organisations worldwide, to ensure every person has access to the information they need to protect their own health and the health of others. There are more than 17,000 HIFA members,...
Poster
Full-text available
Globally, many prescribers receive most of their prescribing information from the pharmaceutical industry, and in many countries this is the only information they receive [1]. Users of medicines have even less information, and often none at all: medicines are dispensed without packaging or the information is in a language they cannot understand. Bo...
Article
Full-text available
Health workforce shortages are key obstacles to the achievement of the health-related Millennium Development Goals. Task shifting is seen as a way to improve access to pregnancy and childbirth care. However, the role of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) within task shifting initiatives remains contested. The objective of this study was to explore...
Article
Full-text available
Within the health system policymakers program managers and health care providers require needs-driving and evidence-based information to inform decision making and improve the quality of services delivered. However many international health and development organizations continue to rely on a push model of information dissemination routinely sending...
Article
Full-text available
Poor knowledge among health care providers (including health workers and citizens) leads to poor health outcomes. This article discusses current linear research-to-practice paradigms and argues that these approaches are not meeting the needs of health care providers in low- and middle-income countries. It suggests a broader, needs-led approach. Thi...
Article
Full-text available
Lawn suggests four key priorities in the next crucial five years,1 but I would like to add a fifth—to focus on the needs of the existing health workforce in the 57 crisis countries, especially mid-level and primary healthcare workers. The …
Article
Full-text available
Lee and colleagues (Improving the quality of care for infants: a cluster ran-domized controlled trial, Aug. 10 online) have presented an intriguing evaluation of 2 QI interventions in their NICUs. The pulmonary group implemented only 23% of their own selected potentially useful practices, but with good effect. The infection group showed no pulmonar...
Article
Full-text available
Health care workers in developing countries continue to lack access to basic, practical information to enable them to deliver safe, effective care. This paper provides the first phase of a broader literature review of the information and learning needs of health care providers in developing countries. A Medline search revealed 1762 papers, of which...
Data
Publications included in literature review (references [1-35]).
Article
Providing access to reliable information for healthcare workers in developing countries is potentially the most cost-effective strategy for improving the quality of healthcare delivery.’ Yet there are many gaps in our understanding of information needs and the international community has hardly begun to build a coherent cross-sectoral approach to m...
Article
Full-text available
Poverty has deepened the crisis in health-care delivery in developing countries, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, which is a region facing a disease burden that is unmatched in the world. Whether access to proven and powerful information and communication technologies (ICTs) can improve health indicators is an ongoing debate. However, this brief re...
Article
Full-text available
In their randomised trial showing reduced in-hospital mortality after improved management of children under 5 years with malaria, Biai et al concede that “we cannot distinguish between the effect of supervising the implementation of the guidelines and the effect of the financial incentive in reducing mortality.”1 But this crucial point was lost in...
Article
Full-text available
Universal access to information for health professionals is a prerequisite for meeting the Millennium Development Goals and achieving Health for All. However, despite the promises of the information revolution, and some successful initiatives, there is little if any evidence that the majority of health professionals in the developing world are any...
Article
Full-text available
Although global spending on health research currently exceeds US$ 60 billion, less than 10% of it addresses the diseases and conditions that account for 90% of the global disease burden.1 Many biomedical researchers in developing countries are also professionally isolated by difficulties in accessing, generating, synthesizing and disseminating info...
Article
Full-text available
Hafeez and Mirza have assessed how seriously (or not) pharmaceutical companies take their responsibility to provide information on request to prescribers in Pakistan.1 Two of their conclusions are that “providing information on drugs is not a priority for companies in Pakistan” and that “the decision to respond to a request for more information the...
Article
Full-text available
Health workers in the developing world are starved of the information that is the lifeblood of effective health care.1 2 As a direct result, their patients suffer and die. In the words of the late James Grant, former executive director of Unicef, “The most urgent task before us is to get medical and health knowledge to those most in need of that kn...
Article
Full-text available
Universal access to information for health professionals is a prerequisite for meeting the Millennium Development Goals and achieving Health for All. However, despite the promises of the information revolution, and some successful initiatives, there is little if any evidence that the majority of health professionals in the developing world are any...
Article
Full-text available
In drawing up the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the international community has committed to reduce child mortality by two-thirds and maternal mortality by threequarters, and to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria by 2015. These goals will only be achieved if we focus on the needs of healthcare providers.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
www.hifa.org