Negi Gcs

Negi Gcs
GB Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development · Environmental assessment & Management

M.Sc. (Botany), Ph.D. (Forest Ecology)

About

106
Publications
72,505
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1,632
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 1993 - November 2015
Kumaun University
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Pursue multidisciplinary R&D on contemporary issues of natural resources in the Indian Himalayan region and knowledge dissemination through publication and attending seminars/workshops etc.

Publications

Publications (106)
Article
Full-text available
The study of leaf and shoot growth characteristics in Tungnath (Uttarakhand) found Abies pindrow trees taller than A. spectabilis (40.3±1.80 vs. 27.7±1.15 m), and the tree height declined but tree CBH increased with the increasing altitude.
Chapter
Phenological behaviour of five treeline species (viz Abies spectabilis, Betula utilis, Quercus semecarpifolia, Rhododendron arboreum and Rhododendron campanulatum) was studied in Tungnath (Uttarakhand), West Himalaya. These species show annual variations in initiation and culmination of various phenophases, which were significantly correlated (P <...
Chapter
This study was carried out in Pothivasa-Tungnath-Chopta area of Garhwal Himalaya, India to enumerate the occurrence of lower plants (Pteridophytes, Bryophytes and Lichens) along an elevation belt of 2100–2850 masl, encompassing NW and SW aspects and habitat types ranging from dense forests to timberline and alpine meadow in peak growing season in S...
Book
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This booklet contains an account of various livelihood-promoting, income-generating and environment-friendly R&D activities carried out across six villages in the Jyoli village cluster, Hawalbagh block (District Almora, Uttarakhand) under the Transformative project of CSED.
Book
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This book or monograph provides details of the database of NGOs working in the different disciplines in the Himalayan region.
Article
In the Central Himalayan mountains forest ecosystems occupy over two-third of the landscape. People of the region largely depend upon a variety of ecosystem goods and services (ES) emanating from these forest ecosystems for their subsistence living. The rich diversity of Central Himalayan forests harbors over 675 wild plant species used by people a...
Book
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The database aims to provide an instant facility of pooled datasets on subject-wise experts working across universities (115) of Indian Himalayan Region. Further, it envisages offering an easy search mechanism for finding readily available information on subject –specific experts for improved synergy, convergence possibilities and deliberations whi...
Book
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The database aims to provide an instant facility of pooled datasets on subject-wise experts working across R&D Institutions (82) of Indian Himalayan Region. Further, it envisages offering an easy search mechanism for finding readily available information on subject – pecific experts for improved synergy, convergence possibilities and deliberations...
Article
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This paper presents the periodicity of phenophases in 28 tree species (142 individuals), 58 shrub, and 72 herb species' populations for 23 months (during 2018-2020) vis-a-vis weather variability in four semi-deciduous and evergreen forests along an altitudinal transect (680-1860 m asl) in long-term ecological monitoring (LTEM) sites in Western Hima...
Book
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This technical manual is an outcome of joint efforts from the RTC (Rural Technology Complex) CSED (GBPNIHE) towards the utilization of pine needles for utilization in various environment friendly low-cost interventions towards livelihood generation and , socio-economic upliftment and environmental protection.
Article
We present phenological data for two time periods (1985–1987 and 2014–2016) on major tree species (Shorea robusta, Pinus roxburghii, Myrica esculenta, Quercus leucotrichophora, Rhododendron arboreum, Quercus floribunda, and Machilus duthiei) occurring along an altitudinal gradient of 300–2,200 m asl of Himalayan forests (a data-deficient region ide...
Book
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Concerns emerged following the Earth summit in 1992 and the subsequent establishment of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in 1993 led to the greater emphasis on i)conservation of biological diversity, ii)the sustainable use of its components,and iii)the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resour...
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The evidence of global temperature rise is now widely accepted. On average the global temperature rose by 0.74 C over the last hundred years (1906-2005), with more than half of this rise, i.e., 0.44 C reportedly occurred in the last 25 years. Subsequently, the number of extreme precipitation events-like heavy rainfall and severe storms-appears to h...
Article
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The Himalayan mountains have emerged among the most sensitive ecosystems under the global climate change (CC) scenario. Impacts of CC are realized all across the physical, biological and socio-economic components of the ecosystems. Particularly, community distribution range of plant species and their phenologies are predicted to experience varying...
Article
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This article enumerates the findings of a team research on the Indian Himalayan timberline ecotone, with focus on three sites (located in Kashmir, Utta-rakhand and Sikkim). Timberline elevation increased from west to east, was higher in the warmer south aspect than the cooler north aspect, and was generally depressed. Betula, Abies, Rhododendron an...
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Tea cultivation in Uttarakhand
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Tea gardening in Uttarakhand
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The evidence of global temperature rise is now widely accepted. On average the global temperature rose by 0.74 C over the last hundred years (1906-2005), with more than half of this rise, i.e., 0.44 C reportedly occurred in the last 25 years. Subsequently, the number of extreme precipitation events-like heavy rainfall and severe storms-appears to h...
Article
Full-text available
In Uttarakhand (a mountains state in northwest Himalaya, India) tea gardening dates back to 1835. Tea industry flourished in Uttarakhand until early 19th century, and then declined gradually due to several ecological and socioeconomic reasons. In 1987, the State Government initiated revival of over 1000 ha tea gardens, and aimed to promote eco-frie...
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Article
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Soil macrofauna diversity in Himalayan mountain agroecosystems has received negligible attention despite people's dependence on soil fertility that determines crop yield for their sustenance. This study was carried out with the objective to determine differences in soil macrofauna taxonomic groups and abundance with soil depth (0-30 cm) in irrigate...
Chapter
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After the observation of IPCC 4th assessment that the Himalayas are “data deficient” with regard to climate change, some progress has been made particularly in the areas of glacier shrinkage, snow cover change, glacial lake outburst flooding, river discharge, treeline advance, phenological shift, climate change mitigation and adaptations, and peopl...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Himalayan mountains have emerged among the most sensitive ecosystems under the global climate change (CC) scenario. Impacts of CC are realized all across the physical, biological and socio-economic components of the ecosystems. Particularly, community distribution range of plant species and their phenologies are predicted to experience varying...
Book
Full-text available
This information booklet is an outcome of continuous collection of specimens and information by researchers of Kumaun University and the GBPNIHESD, mainly in Surya-Kunj, ex-situ conservation site of the Institute and the Institute’s campus during 2018-19. Financial support for publication of booklet under In-house Project No. 2 on long-term ecologi...
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In the Indian sub-continent Lantana has invaded vast tracts of dry-moist forests and other culturable wastelands, and has potentially altered biodiversity, landscape ecology and ecosystem services. It has invaded most Indian pasture lands (13.2 million ha) besides forest and fallow areas, and the cost of its control is estimated at US$ 70 per ha. T...
Article
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Sensitivity of alpine treeline ecotone to climate change and upward shift of plants due to warming have been reported from many parts of the globe. However, such research in the climate sensitive western Himalaya is still in infancy due to paucity of past climatic and vegetation distribution data to detect the change. In this paper we determined th...
Article
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In this study on treeline phenology in Tungnath, Garhwal Himalaya (altitude, 2955-3334 m asl), we (i) collected data on micro-climatic conditions, timing of major phenophases, leaf and shoot growth phenology and leaf nitrogen resorption in four major tree species (Abies spectabilis, Betula utilis, Quercus semecarpifolia, Rhododendron arboreum) and...
Article
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This paper deals with leaf area and leaf mass changes across the annual growth cycle in eight major forest forming tree species of Western Himalayan forests along an altitudinal gradient of 300-2200 m asl to elucidate the impact of atmospheric warming on leaf traits. We have taken forest aspects (North, N and South, S) as the proxy of atmospheric w...
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Hindu Kush Himalaya is home to many cultural and religious sites. The literature on the valuation of cultural sites in the mountain terrains is thin. Hence, their development and sustainability are often ignored. Using primary survey data from three different sites in the Kailash Sacred Landscape of India and Nepal, the cultural value of religious...
Technical Report
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Report of Working Group V: Data for Informed Decision Making
Article
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Sensitivity of alpine treeline ecotone to climate change and upward shift of plants due to warming have been reported from many parts of the globe. However, such research in the climate sensitive western Himalaya is still in infancy due to paucity of past climatic and vegetation distribution data to detect the change. In this paper we determined th...
Book
Full-text available
NITI Aayog (Rural Development Division), Govt. of India vide letter No. P. 12018/12/2016-RD Dt. 2 June 2017 constituted five working groups for Sustainable Development in Mountains of Indian Himalayan region (IHR) and identified the G.B. Pant National Institute of Himalayan Environment and Sustainable Development (GBPNIHESD) as Lead Institution and...
Article
In agroecosystems, rich soil biodiversity performs a variety of ecological services and contributes to sustainability of agriculture. In spite of the vast knowledge on this subject globally, the Himalayan mountain agroecosystems remain almost unexplored, and the agriculture is practiced on a subsistence level in the desire of suitable soil fertilit...
Research
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This policy brief presents results on use values for cultural and water provisioning services of forest ecosystems in Kailash Sacred Landscapes (Nepal and India); and willingness to pay for managing a watershed that supplies drinking water to a small township (Nepal).
Technical Report
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and based in Kathmandu, Nepal. Globalisation and climate change have an increasing influence on the stability of fragile mountain ecosystems and the livelihoods of mountain people. ICIMOD aims to assist mountain people to understand these changes, adapt to them, and make the most of new opportunities, while addressing upstream-downstream issues. We...
Conference Paper
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Sacred forests are a group of trees or a patch of vegetation protected by the local people through religious beliefs and socio-cultural regulations practices. Uttarakhand has a rich history of conservation of forests through this approach. The present study was carried out in eight temperate sacred forests of Pithoragarh district, Kumaun Himalaya s...
Article
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The people’s perception on environmental and socio-economic impacts due to three hydro-electric projects (HEPs; commissioned and under construction) were studied in the north-west Indian Himalaya. Surveys among 140 project-affected people (PAPs) using a checklist of impacts indicate that among the negative impacts, decrease in flora/fauna, agricult...
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Natural disasters and human tragedy in the context of Himalayan States
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This manual includes simple methods for quantifying and valuing some of the important forest ecosystem services, with an aim to empower the rural populace to assess the value of their forests.
Research
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Special Issue on HIMADRI Network
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This study was carried out across eighteen forest stands dominated by Pinus roxburghii and Quercus leucotrichophora forests to understand vegetation patterns and physico-chemical properties of soils in Khulgad watershed (District Almora in Uttarakhand) with a particular focus on carbon stock in vegetation and soil pool. C-sequestration in vegetatio...
Article
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Physico-chemical properties of soil of two dominant forest types in Western Himalaya, viz. oak (Quercus leucotrichophora) and pine (Pinus roxburghii) across three soil depths, and winter and rainy seasons were analysed. In general, all the soil parameters, viz. soil moisture, water-holding capacity, organic carbon and total nitrogen decreased signi...
Chapter
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Agriculture is the major economic and livelihood activity for Himalayan people. In this region, forests supply nutrients to the farmland soils in the form of fodder, leaf litter and soil washouts, and contribute to the agriculture and crop yield. By investigating soils of oak and pine stands, which are the prominent forest types in the Western Hima...
Article
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This article presents an overview of climate change impacts on agriculture, water and forest ecosystems in the western Himalayan mountains based on literature review and some anecdotal evidences. A great deal of research work has been carried out on different aspects of western Himalayan mountain ecosystems but the findings have yet to be correlate...
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This book consists of 24 chapters on invasive alien plants in India presented under the following headings: plant invasion in India (an overview); major invasive plants (part I); status, mapping and distribution (part II); environmental impact and risk assessment (part III); population dynamics and utilization (part IV); and management and legislat...
Article
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In the western Himalayan region (Uttarakhand State in India), oak (Quercus leucotrichophora) and pine (Pinus roxburghii) are the two major forest ecosystems. Because of their difference in functionality, this study was aimed at the quantification and valuation of provisioning and regulating services provided by the oak and pine forests and to asses...
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The concentration and mass of nitrogen (N) were followed seasonally in leaves of 26 trees species of Central Himalaya: 11 evergreen species with about 1-year leaf life-span and 15 deciduous species. Like the deciduous species, the leaves of these evergreen species start senescing and losing mass in the year of formation. Species with higher N statu...
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This study provides an overview of the impacts of a proposed hydroelectric power project in the Western Himalayan region in India, using a primary database on floristic diversity and vegetation analysis. The remote sensing data revealed that in the submergence zone only mixed deciduous forest that occupies 807.5 ha area and has a wood biomass volum...
Article
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Oak and pine are the two dominant forest types in the Central Himalayan region. Local people traditionally utilise provisioning services of these forests for maintaining agroecosystems, and also make invaluable contributions to the conservation of forest resources and maintaining high agrobiodiversity. In community forestry programmes, when climati...
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Landsliding is a complex process that modifies mountainscapes worldwide. Its severe and sometimes long-lasting negative effects contrast with the less-documented positive effects on ecosystems, raising numerous questions about the dual role of landsliding the feedbacks between biotic and geomorphic processes, and, ultimately, the ecological and evo...
Article
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In the rainfed crop fields of the Central Himalayan Mountains in India, low soil moisture and low soil fertility are the two major constraints on crop yield. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis of whether mixing a high-quality (high foliar N, P, and K and low lignin) organic residue (Lantana camara leaves) with the relativ...
Article
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Population dynamics, mortality factors, growth and dry weight changes in Quercus floribunda seedlings were studied to determine the implication of sun and shade microsites and the role of mast years on regeneration and maintenance of oak forests in Kumaun Himalaya. The number of seedlings was significantly greater at the sun microsites, but seedlin...
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The Himalaya harbor a wealth of springs and shallow wells used for drinking water and other household purposes. However, discharge from these sources has declined in recent decades—some springs have even dried up—making water a crucial development issue in the region. This article describes a field experiment to increase spring discharge with simpl...
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This volume follows from a project of the Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture that brought together experts in fields ranging across the social sciences, ecology, agricultural sciences, soil and water science, political science and development studies to examine examples of success in reversing land degradation, understand t...
Article
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Leaf and bud demography and shoot growth were studied in 10 evergreen (ES) and 15 deciduous (DS) tree species occurring between 600 and 2200 m elevation in the central Himalayan mountains in India. Results were analyzed to help explain why ES prevail in the vegetation of this region, even though the number of ES is no greater than for DS. Although...
Article
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Relationship between rainfall and spring discharge study is important to understand hydrological behaviour of springs and water resources management. In the Himalayan mountains springs are the freshwater sources for household consumption. We studied six springs of different recharge area characteristics in two micro-watersheds in western Himalayan...
Article
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Conservation and optimal use of soil and water resources assume prime importance in any region, particularly in the mountains. In the Indian Himalayan region (IHR), soil and water conservation (SWC) programme mainly relies upon engineering measures. Realizing the importance of land use and vegetation cover in SWC, hydrological research was initiate...
Article
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Mountains are fragile ecosystems and globally important as water towers of the earth. Sustainable use of mountains depends upon conservation and optimal use of soil and water resources (Ives & Messerli 1989). Despite regional and global efforts to understand the hydrology of the Himalayan region, soil and water conservation (SWC) programmes in this...