Nazim Keven

Nazim Keven
Bilkent University · Department of Philosophy

PhD Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology

About

7
Publications
1,218
Reads
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113
Citations
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey. I completed my MA in the Philosophy Department at Simon Fraser University in 2009 and my PhD in the Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology Program at Washington University in St. Louis in 2016. I received the Science Academy, Turkey's Young Scientist Award BAGEP in 2020. My main area of research is in Philosophy of Cognitive Science, with a particular focus on memory, narratives, and human sociality.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - December 2022
Bilkent University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2009 - August 2016
Washington University in St. Louis
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Hoerl & McCormack argue that animals cannot represent past situations and subsume animals’ memory-like representations within a model of the world. I suggest calling these memory-like representations as what they are without beating around the bush. I refer to them as event memories and explain how they are different from episodic memory and how th...
Article
In our target article, we argued that the positive results of neonatal imitation are likely to be by-products of normal aerodigestive development. Our hypothesis elicited various responses on the role of social interaction in infancy, the methodological issues about imitation experiments, and the relation between the aerodigestive theory and the de...
Article
Autobiographical remembering and future imagining overlap in their underlying psychological and neurological mechanisms. The hippocampus and surrounding regions within the medial temporal lobes (MTL), known for their role in forming and maintaining autobiographical episodic memories, are also thought to play an essential role in fictitious and futu...
Article
Full-text available
In their target article, Mahr and Csibra argue that event and episodic memories share the same scenario construction process. I think this way of carving up the distinction throws the baby out with the bathwater. If there is a substantive difference between event and episodic memory, it is based on a difference in the construction process and how t...
Article
Over 35 years ago, Meltzoff and Moore (1977) published their famous article ‘Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates’. Their central conclusion, that neonates can imitate, was and continues to be controversial. Here we focus on an often neglected aspect of this debate, namely on neonatal spontaneous behaviors themselves. We presen...
Article
To investigate the role of episodic thought about the past and future in moral judgment, we administered a well-established moral judgment battery to individuals with hippocampal damage and deficits in episodic thought (insert Greene et al. 2001). Healthy controls select deontological answers in high-conflict moral scenarios more frequently when th...
Article
Full-text available
Whether non-human animals can have episodic memories remains the subject of extensive debate. A number of prominent memory researchers defend the view that animals do not have the same kind of episodic memory as humans do, whereas others argue that some animals have episodic-like memory—i.e., they can remember what, where and when an event happened...

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