Nayeli Jiménez-Cano

Nayeli Jiménez-Cano
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle

PhD Biology

About

10
Publications
11,428
Reads
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382
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
370 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Nayeli Jiménez-Cano currently works at Facultad de Ciencias Antropológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán leading the Laboratorio de Zooarqueología. Nayeli does research in zooarchaeology, ichthyoarchaeology, environmental archaeology and maya archaeology. Her research interests within archaeological science are human-animal relations, coastal adaptations and paleoecology to aid in adjusting ecological baselines.
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - present
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Position
  • Consumption and Transportation of Fish Resources in the Northern Maya Area during the Classic Period (250-900 AD)
October 2011 - June 2017
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Position
  • PhD
October 2009 - August 2010
Durham University
Position
  • Cod trade and exploitation from Late Iron Age to Norse period in Northwestern Scotland: a perspective from isotopic analyses”
Education
October 2011 - June 2017
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Field of study
  • Biology
October 2009 - October 2010
Durham University
Field of study
  • Palaeoecology
September 2004 - July 2008
Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
A synthetic history of human land use Humans began to leave lasting impacts on Earth's surface starting 10,000 to 8000 years ago. Through a synthetic collaboration with archaeologists around the globe, Stephens et al. compiled a comprehensive picture of the trajectory of human land use worldwide during the Holocene (see the Perspective by Roberts)....
Article
Recent studies of fish remains at Mayan settlements from the Classic (500‐900 AD) and Postclassic (900‐1400 AD) periods are examined. These analyses deepen our understanding of ancient Maya fishing practices and coastal ecosystems and call into question traditional paradigms of environmental stability in the Northern Maya Lowlands. The effects of d...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between the sea and human populations in the Maya world during Prehispanic times is well supported through iconographic and ethnohistoric evidence. The nature and importance of fish resource exploitation, however, during the most important period of Maya history, the Classic Period (AD 250–900), remains largely unknown. Xcambó (AD...
Article
Full-text available
The capture and consumption of sharks and dogfish are important economic activities in the State of Campeche, Mexico. In addition, these resources represent one of the main characteristics in its culinary identity. In this work we present the ethnographic record of roasted dogfish and we also investigate the ethnoarchaeological implications of this...
Article
Full-text available
La Blanca is an urban settlement located in the department of Petén, Guatemala. The site played an important role due to its strategic location alongside the Mopán River basin. This paper presents results of the zooarchaeological studies conducted on this archaeological site during the Classic Terminal period (850-1000 A.D.), a time of social uphea...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents the results of an analysis of fish remains from the pre-Hispanic coastal settlement of Xcambó, Yucatan, Mexico dating from the Early to Late Classical period (350-750 AD). This is one of the first ichthyoarchaeological studies in a Mayan settlement with a dominant presence of fishes in the zooarchaeological assemblage. The resul...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
La ictioarqueología se ocupa del análisis de restos de peces procedentes de yacimientos arqueológicos, con la finalidad de la reconstrucción paleoecológica de los medios acuáticos antiguos y de la paleoeconomía de las poblaciones humanas del pasado. Entre los restos de peces se incluyen huesos, otolitos, dientes y escamas, siendo su análisis una ap...
Article
Full-text available
Dryslwyn Castle in southwest Wales was founded by a Welsh lord in the AD 1220s, captured by the English in 1287, and declined from c.1407 until it was abandoned c.1450. In contrast to historical evidence for changes in procurement of meat, previous zooarchaeological work has suggested that throughout these three periods, there was no change in the...

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