Nathaniel S Rieger

Nathaniel S Rieger
Boston College, USA | BC · Psychology Department

Doctor of Philosophy
Studying behavioral neuroscience with a focus on the insular cortex, CRF, maternal immune activation and social behavior

About

12
Publications
1,083
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66
Citations
Introduction
I am a behavioral neuroscientist focused on how the insula helps to control social behavior. In particular I am working on how CRF in the insula alters social behavior and how this system is perturbed by maternal immune activation. My previous work focused on how pair-bonded California mice coordinate behavior via vocal communication to complete tasks such as protecting their territory and caring for pups.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Boston College, USA
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Studying how CRF in the cortex affects social behavior using a variety of cutting edge behavioral neuroscience techniques.
May 2010 - August 2010
Cougar Mountain Zoo
Position
  • Intern/Docent
Education
August 2013 - December 2018
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Psychology
August 2012 - July 2013
University of Colorado Denver
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2011 - July 2012
University of South Dakota
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Impairments in identifying and responding to the emotions of others manifest in a variety of psychopathologies. Therefore, elaborating the neurobiological mechanisms that underpin social responses to social emotions, or social affective behavior, is a translationally important goal. The insular cortex is consistently implicated in stress-related so...
Article
Full-text available
Coordinated responses to challenge are essential to survival for bonded monogamous animals and may depend on behavioral compatibility. Oxytocin (OT) context-dependently regulates social affiliation and vocal communication, but its role in pair members’ decision to jointly respond to challenge is unclear. To test for OT effects, California mouse fem...
Article
Full-text available
Pair-bonding allows for division of labor across behavioral tasks such as protecting a territory, caring for pups or foraging for food. However, how these labor divisions are determined, whether they are simply intrinsic differences in the individual’s behavior or a coordinated behavioral response by the pair, remains unknown. We used the monogamou...
Article
Avoidance of sick individuals is vital to the preservation of one’s health and preventing transmission of communicable diseases. To do this successfully, one must identify social cues for sickness, which include sickness behaviors and chemosignals, and use this information to orchestrate social interactions. While many social species are highly cap...
Preprint
Full-text available
Impairments in social cognition manifest in a variety of psychiatric disorders, making the neurobiological mechanisms underlying social decision making of particular translational importance. The insular cortex is consistently implicated in stress-related social and anxiety disorders, which are associated with diminished ability to make and use inf...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social context is critical in shaping behavioral responses to stimuli and can alter an individual's behavioral type, which would otherwise be fixed in social isolation. For monogamous biparental vertebrates, social context is critical as interactions are frequent and consistent, involving high interindividual dependence and cooperation that can lea...
Article
Keywords: aggression coordination division of labour monogamy parental care pup retrieval territoriality ultrasonic vocalizations Division of labour allows group-living species to efficiently complete tasks while minimizing resource expenditure. This generally involves task allocation between individuals. In territorial defence and parental care sp...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic communication is vital to complex social behaviours such as territorial defence. The use of ultrasonic vocalizations, particularly in territorial defence by monogamous species and females, remains understudied. We studied ultrasonic vocalization production and associated aggression in the monogamous, biparental and territorial California m...

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