Nathan Young

Nathan Young
University of Ottawa · Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Environmental sociology

About

97
Publications
23,354
Reads
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2,183
Citations
Citations since 2016
68 Research Items
1862 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500

Publications

Publications (97)
Article
Full-text available
For decades, the working paradigm for ecological restoration was independent operation of knowledge generators (researchers and scientists) and knowledge users (decision makers and practitioners), resulting in a knowledge–action gap. Knowledge co‐production is a collaborative process where research is conducted in a respectful and engaging manner w...
Research
Full-text available
Electronic Supplementary Material Title: Uncertainty, anxiety, and optimism: Diverse perspectives of rainbow and steelhead trout fisheries governance in British Columbia
Article
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Inland fisheries support the livelihoods of millions of people in riparian communities worldwide but are influenced by increasing climate variability and change. Freshwater fishing societies are among the most vulnerable to climate change given their dependence on highly threatened aquatic resources. As climate change intensifies, building adaptive...
Article
Inland fisheries assessment and management are challenging given the inherent complexity of working in diverse habitats (e.g., rivers, lakes, wetlands) that are dynamic on organisms that are often cryptic and where fishers are often highly mobile. Yet, technoscience is offering new tools that have the potential to reimagine how inland fisheries are...
Article
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Inland fisheries are complex social-ecological systems that can generate important nutritional, economic, cultural, and recreational benefits. Effective management of these systems for multiple user-groups requires an understanding of the complex natural and human dimensions interactions within them. We examine the perceptions of stakeholders, Indi...
Article
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In response to colonial research paradigms that have subjugated Indigenous Peoples, knowledges, lands, and waters, Indigenous research methodologies have emerged to center Indigenous visions and voices in research practice. Here, we employ such methodologies to improve collective understanding of the state and future of wild Pacific salmon (Oncorhy...
Article
Full-text available
The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is dramatically impacting planetary and human societal systems that are inseparably linked. Zoonotic diseases like COVID-19 expose how human well-being is inextricably interconnected with the environment and to other converging (human driven) social–ecological crises, such as the dramatic losses of b...
Article
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Ecosurveillance has proliferated in recent years, generating vast amounts of data on the natural environment. Ecosurveillance also has significant potential impacts on humans; therefore, researchers and policymakers need new conceptual tools to anticipate and mitigate any negative effects. Surveillance studies is an interdisciplinary field in the s...
Article
Environmental decisions related to policy and practice should be based on the best available evidence. Given the vast amounts of information of varying reliability, an ongoing challenge for decision-makers is how to access, collate, and use this information. The Collaboration for Environmental Evidence (CEE) is dedicated to the synthesis of environ...
Article
The Rideau Canal National Historic Site is a complex social-ecological system that connects the Ottawa River and the St-Lawrence River in Eastern Ontario, Canada. As an interjurisdictional waterway, it presents interconnected social-ecological challenges. In this article, we analyze findings from five participatory workshops held with stakeholder g...
Article
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Natural resources management (NRM) is complex and relies on decisions supported by evidence, including Western-based science (WBS) and Indigenous and local knowledge. However, it has been shown that there is a disconnect between WBS and its application, whereby managers often draw on non-empirical sources of information (i.e., intuition or advice f...
Article
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Research results are often not easily accessible or readily digestible for decision-making by natural resource managers. This knowledge-action gap is due to various factors including the time lag between new knowledge generation and its transfer, lack of formal management structures, and institutional inertia to its uptake. Herein, we reflect on th...
Article
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In this article, we integrate our authorship experiences with insights from nine interviews of knowledge exchange practitioners at the Canadian Forest Service about challenges and opportunities of digital knowledge exchange (KE) brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. We aim to inform how best to maintain effective KE practices and processes in a digi...
Article
Conservation researchers have been shown to be motivated by the application of their work to address real world problems. However, a significant number of recent studies in the sociology of science and related fields such as knowledge exchange and knowledge mobilization have shown that direct influence of conservation science on policy and practice...
Article
Full-text available
For better or for worse, authorship is a currency in scholarly research and advancement. In scholarly writing, authorship is widely acknowledged as a means of conferring credit but is also tied to concepts such as responsibility and accountability. Authorship is one of the most divisive topics both at the level of the research team and more broadly...
Article
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The theory-practice gap (TPG) is well known in the environmental realm, referring to disconnects between knowledge generated through scientific research and the needs, expectations, and practices of knowledge users for environmental decision-making and practice. While the presence of the TPG is well established, we have yet to fully implement mecha...
Article
Full-text available
The knowledge‐action gap in conservation science and practice occurs when research outputs do not result in actions to protect or restore biodiversity. Among the diverse and complex reasons for this gap, three barriers are fundamental: knowledge is often unavailable to practitioners, challenging to interpret, and/or difficult to use. Problems of av...
Article
The COVID-19 pandemic and corresponding public health mitigation strategies have altered many facets of human life. And yet, little is known about how public health measures have impacted complex socio-ecological systems such as recreational fisheries. Using an online snowball survey, we targeted resident anglers in Ontario, Canada, to obtain preli...
Article
Lockdowns associated with the COVID-19 pandemic temporarily restricted human activity and removed people from many places of work and recreation. The resulting ‘Anthropause’ generated much media and research interest and has become an important storyline in the public history of the pandemic. As an ecological event, the Anthropause is fleeting and...
Article
Anthropogenic waterways and canal systems have been part of the cultural and natural landscape for thousands for years. As of the late 20th century, more than 63,000-km of canals exist worldwide as transport routes for navigation, many with barriers (e.g., locks, dams) that fragment the system and decrease connectivity. Fragmentation alone can have...
Article
Pro-environmental behaviours (PEBs) are important for mitigation and restoration efforts in the Anthropocene. As recreationists are motivated to engage in leisure activities to increase their own personal wellbeing, we submit that threats to wellbeing (an egocentric motivator) predict engagement in PEBs amongst recreationists. We also predict that...
Article
Successful incorporation of scientific knowledge into environmental policy and decisions is a significant challenge. Although studies on how to bridge the knowledge-action gap have proliferated over the last decade, few have investigated the roles, responsibilities, and opportunities for funding bodies to meet this challenge. In this study we prese...
Article
Full-text available
Inland recreational fisheries have social, economic, and ecological importance worldwide but these fisheries are increasingly challenged by the diverse effects of climate change. Coupled with other anthropogenic stressors, climate change has contributed to declines in freshwater biodiversity of greater severity than those observed across marine or...
Article
Full-text available
Authorship should acknowledge and reward those deserving of such credit. Moreover, being an author on a paper also means that one assumes ownership of the content. Journals are increasingly requiring author roles to be specified at time of submission using schemes such as the contributor roles taxonomy (CRediT) system, which relies on 14 different...
Preprint
Successful incorporation of scientific knowledge into environmental policy and decisions is a significant challenge. Although studies on how to bridge the knowledge-action gap have grown rapidly over the last decade, few have investigated the roles, responsibilities, and opportunities for funding bodies to meet this challenge. In this study we pres...
Article
Full-text available
Practitioners and policymakers working in environmental arenas make decisions that can have large impacts on ecosystems. Basing such decisions on high‐quality evidence about the effectiveness of different interventions can often maximize the success of policy and management. Accordingly, it is vital to understand how environmental professionals wor...
Article
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Managers of wildlife are faced with decisions and issues that are increasingly complex, spanning natural and human dimensions (i.e. values, preferences, attitudes). A strong evidence base that includes multiple forms and sources of knowledge is needed to support these complex decisions. However, a growing body of literature demonstrates that enviro...
Article
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The science–practice divide is a stubborn problem in environmental management. Existing research tells us that a range of factors affects the uptake of new science into practice and policy, including socio-organizational, individual, and evaluative variables. Here, we seek to understand the variables influencing the uptake of biotelemetry-derived i...
Article
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The historic Rideau Canal, spanning 200 km between the Canadian cities of Ottawa and Kingston, is a world heritage site and recreational waterway. The waterway presents a governance challenge, with multiple jurisdictions and agencies responsible for its management, making it difficult to establish a common vision to address environmental issues. Lo...
Article
As aquatic biodiversity continues to decline, recreational anglers are interacting more frequently with imperiled species. As a result, management strategies must be developed to balance fisheries management and conservation objectives. Understanding the human dimensions of these encounters is important for both fisheries management and conservatio...
Article
Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) invaded the Great Lakes in the early twentieth century and caused considerable economic and ecological harm. People who fished the Great Lakes suffered crippling losses and successfully lobbied elected officials in Canada and the United States to create a sea lamprey control program which the Great Lakes Fishery Co...
Preprint
The COVID-19 pandemic and corresponding public health mitigation strategies have altered many facets of human life. And yet, little is known about how public health measures have impacted complex socio-ecological systems such as recreational fisheries. Using a web-based online snowball survey, we targeted resident anglers in Ontario, Canada, to obt...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Lakseoppdrett er en næring i vekst i nord. En bærekraftig utvikling av næringen er avhengig av en forvaltning som ivaretar både miljømessig og samfunnsmessige hensyn. Rapporten gir en analyse av fire lands forvaltning av næringen, Canada, Færøyene, Island og Norge. Tross store forskjeller i produksjonsvolum, er utfordringene i stor grad de samme. F...
Chapter
Full-text available
Pacific salmon undertake iconic homeward migrations where they move from ocean feeding grounds to coastal rivers where they return to natal spawning sites. However, this migration is physiologically challenging as fish have to navigate past predators, nets, hooks, and dams while dealing with variable flows, warm water temperatures, and pathogens. T...
Article
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Increasingly, fisheries researchers and managers seek or are compelled to “bridge” Indigenous knowledge systems with Western scientific approaches to understanding and governing fisheries. Here, we move beyond the all-too-common narrative about integrating or incorporating (too often used as euphemisms for assimilating) other knowledge systems into...
Article
While fragmentation and habitat loss due to water infrastructure threaten freshwater biodiversity worldwide, historic canals have the potential to contribute to both cultural heritage and biodiversity conservation. Shifting management objectives regarding historic canals from development to recreation and conservation offer opportunities for achiev...
Article
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Environmental decision-makers and practitioners need and deserve high quality environmental evidence for effective decision-making. We collate and share a suite of best practices for applied environmental researchers to support their capacity to inform such decision-making processes. This raises a number of important questions: What does “relevant”...
Article
Although it is assumed that the outcomes from scientific research inform management and policy, the so‐called knowledge–action gap (i.e., the disconnect between scientific knowledge and its application) is a recognition that there are many reasons why new knowledge is not always embraced by knowledge users. The concept of knowledge co‐production ha...
Article
Surveillance of animal movements using electronic tags (i.e., biotelemetry) has emerged as an essential tool for both basic and applied ecological research and monitoring. Advances in animal tracking are occurring simultaneously with changes to technology, in an evolving global scientific culture that increasingly promotes data sharing and transpar...
Article
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Co-management is widely seen as a way of improving environmental governance and empowering communities. When successful, co-management enhances the validity and legitimacy of decision-making, while providing stakeholders with influence over processes and outcomes that directly impact them. However, our research with participants in co-management ac...
Article
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Telemetry is an increasingly common tool for studying the ecology of wild fish, with great potential to provide valuable information for management and conservation. For researchers to conduct a robust telemetry study, many essential considerations exist related to selecting the appropriate tag type, fish capture and tagging methods, tracking proto...
Article
Telemetry is being used to generate an unprecedented level of knowledge on the underwater environment, much of which is relevant to marine policy and management. Yet, examples of telemetry directly informing management practices are still rare or undocumented. Here we describe a case in which fish telemetry data were rapidly incorporated into recre...
Article
Aquatic telemetry technology generates new knowledge about the underwater world that can inform decision‐making processes and thus can improve conservation and natural resource management. Still, there is lack of evidence on how telemetry‐derived knowledge can or has informed management, and what factors facilitate or deter its use. We present one...
Article
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Aquaculture is a major contributor to global food production, but has attracted considerable controversy. Disagreements over the social and ecological impacts of aquaculture (positive and negative) have hindered further expansion of aquaculture production, particularly in wealthy democratic countries. This article presents findings from a series of...
Chapter
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In recent years, natural resource governance has become an important site of creative experimentation in both wealthy and developing countries. Among these are experiments in adaptive co-management (ACM), which are intended to mobilize and coordinate the knowledge, capacities, and authority of senior governments with those of local users and commun...
Article
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Understanding the perspectives of knowledge users and the demands of their decision-making environment would benefit researchers looking to enhance the utility of the knowledge they generate. Using the Fraser River Pacific salmon fishery as a case study, we investigate the views of 49 government employees and stakeholders regarding the barriers to...
Article
Full-text available
Telemetry studies have produced fundamental knowledge on animal biology and ecology that has the potential to improve management of aquatic resources such as fisheries. However, the use and integration of telemetry-derived knowledge into practice remain tenuous, so we surveyed 212 fish telemetry experts to understand existing barriers for incorpora...
Article
Full-text available
Electronic tags are significantly improving our understanding of aquatic animal behavior and are emerging as key sources of information for conservation and management practices. Future aquatic integrative biology and ecology studies will increasingly rely on data from electronic tagging. Continued advances in tracking hardware and software are nee...
Technical Report
The main objective of the AquaLog project is to understand factors and forces that influence the aquaculture controversy in the Arctic communities. This report summarizes the second workshop in Vancouver, Canada 23-27th April 2017. The project is funded by the Nordic Council of Minister and the Norwegian Fram Centre.
Article
Full-text available
It is increasingly common for scientists to engage in sharing science-related knowledge with diverse knowledge users—an activity called science communication. Given that many scientists now seek information on how to communicate effectively, we have generated a list of 16 important considerations for those interested in science communication: (1) D...
Article
The overuse of disposable plastic bags is a major environmental problem across the globe. In recent years, numerous jurisdictions have sought to curb disposable bag use by implementing a levy or fee at the point of purchase. These levies are typically small and symbolic (around $0.05 per bag), but serve as a highly-visible and continuous reminder t...
Article
One of the most hotly debated ideas in science studies is the claim that contemporary science is in the midst of a transformation. While ‘transformationalist’ arguments and concepts vary, their core principle is that the norms, values and practices that have enforced the separation of science from society are being challenged by new expectations th...
Article
Full-text available
The potential for telemetry data to answer complex questions about aquatic animals and their interactions with the environment is limited by the capacity to store, manage, and access data across the research community. Large telemetry networks and databases exist, but are limited by the actions of researchers to share their telemetry data. Promotin...
Article
Developments in electronic tagging and tracking, including biotelemetry and biologging, have provided unprecedented insight into the ecology of wild animals (Cooke et al. 2004) and revealed hidden movement patterns, habitat associations, animal-environment interactions, and mortality rates for even the most cryptic of species (Hussey et al. 2015; K...
Article
Environmental scientists have long been frustrated by the difficulties involved in transferring their research findings into policy-making, management, and public spheres. Despite increases in scientific knowledge about social-ecological systems, research has consistently shown that regulators and stakeholders draw on tacit, informal, and experient...
Article
Full-text available
Scholars across all disciplines have long been interested in how knowledge moves within and beyond their community of peers. In conservation and natural resource management, however, we are lagging behind. Rapid environmental changes and calls for sustainable management practices mean that we urgently need to be using the best knowledge possible in...
Article
Full-text available
The inability of physiologists to effect change in fisheries management has been the source of frustration for many decades. Close collaboration between fisheries managers and researchers has afforded our interdisciplinary team an unusual opportunity to evaluate the emerging impact that physiology can have in providing relevant and credible scienti...
Article
Approaches to managing inland fisheries vary between systems and regions but are often based on large-scale marine fisheries principles and thus limited and outdated. Rarely do they adopt holistic approaches that consider the complex interplay among humans, fish, and the environment. We argue that there is an urgent need for a shift in inland fishe...
Article
This article examines threat perception as a potential dimension of inter-group conflict over salmon fisheries in Canada's Fraser River watershed. Environmental changes and the entry of new user groups are putting pressure on both the resource and regulators, as well as threatening to exacerbate conflicts, notably between First Nation (indigenous)...
Conference Paper
Knowledge is a critical resource in fisheries management, but it is also a source of conflict and competition. Rapid environmental changes are spurring calls for better “knowledge mobilization” or the integration of scientific and local/traditional knowledge into management practice. Given the social-ecological complexity of fisheries resources, fi...
Conference Paper
This paper presents analysis of interview data from a study of ‘knowledge mobilization’ as a social process. In doing so it contrasts concepts of ‘knowledge transfer’ with those of ‘knowledge mobilization’ which it sees as a non-linear and iterative process involving social organization, institutional cultures and human interactions. It is based on...