Nathan J Hostetter

Nathan J Hostetter
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

PhD Fisheries Wildlife and Conservation Biology

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42
Publications
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422
Citations

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
How predators respond to changes in prey abundance (i.e., functional responses) is foundational to consumer–resource interactions, predator–prey dynamics, and the stability of predator–prey systems. Predation by piscivorous waterbirds on out‐migrating juvenile steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is considered a factor affecting the recovery of mu...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the cumulative effects of predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on the survival of multiple salmonid ( Oncorhynchus spp.) populations listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) and determined what proportion of all sources of fish mortality (1 –survival) were due to birds in the Columbia River basin, USA. Anadromous j...
Article
Animal movement is a fundamental ecological process affecting the survival and reproduction of individuals, the structure of populations, and the dynamics of communities. Methods to quantify animal movement and spatiotemporal abundances, however, are generally separate and thus omit linkages between individual‐level and population‐level processes....
Article
Over the last decade, spatial capture‐recapture (SCR) models have become widespread for estimating demographic parameters in ecological studies. However, the underlying assumptions about animal movement and space use are often not realistic. This is a missed opportunity because interesting ecological questions related to animal space use, habitat s...
Article
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Climate change threatens global biodiversity. Many species vulnerable to climate change are important to humans for nutritional, cultural, and economic reasons. Polar bears Ursus maritimus are threatened by sea‐ice loss and represent a subsistence resource for Indigenous people. We applied a novel population modeling‐management framework that is ba...
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Estimates of species abundance are critical to understand population processes and to assess and select management actions. However, capturing and marking individuals for abundance estimation, while providing robust information, can be economically and logistically prohibitive, particularly for species with cryptic behavior. Camera traps can be use...
Article
Ecologists and conservation biologists increasingly rely on spatial capture‐recapture (SCR) and movement modeling to study animal populations. Historically, SCR has focused on population‐level processes (e.g., vital rates, abundance, density, and distribution), while animal movement modeling has focused on the behavior of individuals (e.g., activit...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the influence of individual attributes on demographic processes is a key objective of wildlife population studies. Capture-recapture and age data are commonly collected to investigate hypotheses about survival, reproduction, and viability. We present a novel age-structured Jolly-Seber model that incorporates age and capture-recapture...
Article
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Aim Many species face large‐scale range contractions and predicted distributional shifts in response to climate change, shifting forest characteristics and anthropogenic disturbances. Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and were recently recommended for delisting. Predicted climate‐driven los...
Article
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Background: Acoustic telemetry technologies are being increasingly deployed to study a variety of aquatic taxa including fishes, reptiles, and marine mammals. Large cooperative telemetry networks produce vast quantities of data useful in the study of movement, resource selection and species distribution. Efficient use of acoustic telemetry data re...
Article
The degree to which predation is an additive versus compensatory source of mortality is fundamental to understanding the effects of predation on prey populations and evaluating the efficacy of predator management actions. In the Columbia River basin, USA, predation by Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) on U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)‐listed ju...
Article
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There is considerable interest in evaluating the status and trends of sturgeon populations, yet many traditional approaches to estimating the abundance of fishes are intractable due to their biology and rarity. Side-scan sonar has recently emerged as an effective tool for censusing sturgeon in rivers, yet challenges remain for censusing open popula...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Acoustic telemetry technologies are being rapidly deployed to study a variety of aquatic taxa including fishes, reptiles, and marine mammals. Large cooperative telemetry networks produce vast quantities of data useful in the study of movement, resource selection and species distribution. Efficient use of acoustic telemetry data requires...
Article
To investigate the cumulative effects of colonial waterbird predation on fish mortality and to determine what proportion of all sources of fish mortality (1‐survival) were due to bird predation, we conducted a mark‐recapture‐recovery study with Upper Columbia River steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss that were tagged (passive integrated transponder...
Article
Full-text available
Identifying where, when, and how many animals live and die over time is principal to understanding factors that influence population dynamics. Capture–recapture–recovery (CRR) models are widely used to estimate animal survival and, in many cases, quantify specific causes of mortality (e.g., harvest, predation, starvation). However, the restrictive...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate estimates of population abundance are essential to both theoretical and applied ecology. Rarely are all individuals detected during a survey and abundance models often incorporate some form of imperfect detection. Detection probability, however, consists of three components: probability of presence during a survey, probability of availabil...
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Abstract Large carnivores are imperiled globally, and characteristics making them vulnerable to extinction (e.g., low densities and expansive ranges) also make it difficult to estimate demographic parameters needed for management. Here we develop an integrated population model to analyze capture-recapture, radiotelemetry, and count data for the Chu...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluation of alternative management strategies enables informed decisions to accelerate species recovery. For reintroductions, post‐release survival to reproductive age is a key parameter influencing population growth. Here, we trial a ‘stepping‐stone’ method to maximize the success of captive‐bred animals when the availability of more suitable wi...
Article
In capture-mark-reencounter studies, Pollock’s robust design combines methods for open populations with methods for closed populations. Open population features of the robust design allow for estimation of rates of death or permanent emigration, and closed population features enhance estimation of population sizes. We describe a similar design, but...
Article
We developed a state-space mark–recapture–recovery model that incorporates multiple recovery types and state uncertainty to estimate survival of an anadromous fish species. We apply the model to a dataset of outmigrating juvenile steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792)) tagged with passive integrated transponders, recaptured during out...
Article
Full-text available
In populations of long-lived species, adult survival typically has a relatively high influence on population growth. From a management perspective, however, adult survival can be difficult to increase in some instances, so other component rates must be considered to reverse population declines. In North Carolina, USA, management to conserve the Ame...
Article
Trait-selective mortality is of considerable management and conservation interest, especially when trends are similar across multiple species of conservation concern. In the Columbia River basin, thousands of juvenile Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. are collected each year and are tagged at juvenile bypass system (JBS) facilities located at hyd...
Article
Full-text available
The extensive breeding range of many shorebird species can make integration of survey data problematic at regional spatial scales. We evaluated the effectiveness of standardized repeated count surveys coordinated across 8 agencies to estimate the abundance of American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) breeding pairs in the southeastern United St...
Article
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Accurate assessment of specific mortality factors is vital to prioritize recovery actions for threatened and endangered species. For decades, tag recovery methods have been used to estimate fish mortality due to avian predation. Predation probabilities derived from fish tag recoveries on piscivorous waterbird colonies typically reflect minimum esti...
Article
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We investigated colony size, productivity, and limiting factors for five piscivorous waterbird species nesting at 18 locations on the Columbia Plateau (Washington) during 2004–2010 with emphasis on species with a history of salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) depredation. Numbers of nesting Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) and double-crested cormorants...
Article
Understanding how individual characteristics are associated with survival is important to programs aimed at recovering fish populations of conservation concern. To evaluate whether individual fish characteristics observed during the juvenile life stage were associated with the probability of returning as an adult, juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus my...
Article
Full-text available
Identification of the factors that influence susceptibility to predation can aid in developing management strategies to recover fish populations of conservation concern. Predator–prey relationships can be influenced by numerous factors, including prey condition, prey size, and environmental conditions. We investigated these factors by using juvenil...
Article
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We recovered passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags from nine piscivorous waterbird colonies in the Columbia River basin to evaluate avian predation on Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed salmonid Oncorhynchus spp. populations during 2007–2010. Avian predation rates were calculated based on the percentage of PIT-tagged juvenile salmonids that we...
Article
Full-text available
The health condition of out-migrating juvenile salmonids can influence migration success. Physical damage, pathogenic infection, contaminant exposure, and immune system status can affect survival probability. The present study is part of a wider investigation of out-migration success in juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and focuses on the ap...
Article
Full-text available
Colony size, nesting ecology and diet of Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia) were investigated in the San Francisco Bay area (SFBA) during 2003–2009 to assess the potential for conservation of the tern breeding population and possible negative effects of predation on survival of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.). Numbers of breeding Caspian Ter...
Article
Understanding how the external condition of juvenile salmonids is associated with internal measures of health and subsequent out-migration survival can be valuable for population monitoring programs. This study investigated the use of a rapid, nonlethal, external examination to assess the condition of run-of-the-river juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchu...
Conference Paper
Identification of individual fish characteristics and environmental conditions associated with increased susceptibility to predation can aid in recovery efforts for threatened populations. To investigate these associations, juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were tagged (passive integrated transponder), externally examined, and released back...
Article
Graduation date: 2010 The ability to non-destructively assess fish condition and subsequently track fish behavior and survival can be vital in understanding natural and anthropogenic stressors and sources of mortality, especially in populations of fish listed as threatened or endangered. I investigated the use of a quick, non-lethal, external exami...

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