Nathan Geffen

Nathan Geffen
University of Cape Town | UCT · Centre for Social Science Research

MSc

About

49
Publications
78,923
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424
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
177 Citations
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Introduction
Nathan Geffen is a visiting research at the Centre for Social Science Research, University of Cape Town (UCT). He is the editor of GroundUp, a South African news agency. He has also studied and taught computer science at UCT. Nathan has published extensively on human rights and the HIV epidemic. His recent work in computer science has investigated algorithms for speeding up simulations of sexually transmitted infection epidemics.

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
Microsimulations are increasingly used to estimate the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). These models consist of agents which represent a sexually active population. Matching agents into sexual relationships is computationally intensive and presents modellers with difficult design decisions: how to select which partnerships betw...
Data
Computational implementation. Computational implementation of FastSTI. (PDF)
Data
Partner market parameters. Age-specific parameter values for entering and leaving the partner market. (PDF)
Thesis
Full thesis available here: https://open.uct.ac.za/handle/11427/27855 Mathematical models of the HIV epidemic have been used to estimate inci- dence, prevalence and life-expectancy, as well the benefits and costs of public health interventions, such as the provision of antiretroviral treatment. Mod- els of sexually transmitted infection epidemics...
Article
Full-text available
We review key mathematical models of the South African human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic from the early 1990s onwards. In our descriptions, we sometimes differentiate between the concepts of a model world and its mathematical or computational implementation. The model world is the conceptual realm in which we explicitly declare the rules...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Since 1987 HIV scientists and activists have debated the optimal point to start antiretroviral treatment. Positions have varied between treating people with HIV as soon as they are diagnosed, based on biological, modelling and observational evidence, versus delaying treatment until points in disease progression at which clinical trial e...
Article
Full-text available
Microsimulations and agent-based models across various disciplines need to match agents into relationships. Some of these models need to repeatedly match different pairs of agents, for example microsimulations of sexually transmitted infection epidemics. We describe the requirements for pair-matching in these types of microsimulations, and present...
Article
Purpose of review: We describe the role of activism in improving access to quality HIV treatment. Recent findings: In many countries, AIDS activists have campaigned for improved access to HIV treatment and prevention interventions. Studying medicine, epidemiology and law, and developing expertise in these fields, has been crucial to the success...
Article
Full-text available
Brandon Huntley was granted asylum in Canada earlier this year based on the argument that whites are disproportionately affected by crime in South Africa. The decision was generally condemned, but it did receive support from various groups and individuals including Afriforum, the Freedom Front and James Myburgh (editor of Politicsweb). In this arti...
Article
Background: Different models of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) can yield substantially different conclusions about STI epidemiology, and it is important to understand how and why models differ. Frequency-dependent models make the simplifying assumption that STI incidence is proportional to STI prevalence in the population, whereas network...
Article
Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has a high mortality rate. Most medicines used to treat it are poorly tested and have terrible side effects. Activists have campaigned for patients with drug-resistant TB to have access to experimental drugs, particularly one called bedaquiline, before these have been approved by regulatory authorities such as the F...
Article
Determining when to start antiretroviral treatment (ART) is vitally important for people living with HIV. Yet the optimal point at which to start to maximize clinical benefit remains unknown. In the absence of randomized studies, current guidelines rely on conflicting observational data and expert opinion, and consequently diverge on this point. In...
Article
Advances in antiretroviral treatment mean that patients in the public health system can be given more options in the management of their treatment. Although public health programmes tend to offer one-size-fits-all approaches, patients might benefit from a more flexible approach. In particular, we propose that people with HIV should be given more ch...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in antiretroviral treatment mean that patients in the public health system can be given more options in the management of their treatment. Although public health programmes tend to offer one-size-fits-all approaches, patients might benefit from a more flexible approach. In particular, we propose that people with HIV should be given more ch...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in antiretroviral treatment mean that patients in the public health system can be given more options in the management of their treatment. Although public health programmes tend to offer one-size-fits-all approaches, patients might benefit from a more flexible approach. In particular, we propose that people with HIV should be given more ch...
Article
When should people with HIV start treatment? This question is widely debated. The recent momentum to initiate treatment at a CD4 cell count above 350 cells/mm is driven by the potential population benefits of antiretroviral treatment reducing infectiousness together with operational concerns. These are important. However, we focus on the clinical b...
Poster
Full-text available
Comparison of two methods of modelling epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections.
Article
Background Deterministic models are widely used in simulating the potential effect of programmes for the prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, most deterministic models are frequency-dependent and do not model pair formation explicitly, which can lead to inaccuracies. We aim to quantify these ina...
Article
The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that HIV-positive adults start antiretroviral therapy (ART) at CD4 counts <350 cells/mu l. Several countries have changed their guidelines to recommend ART irrespective of CD4 count or at a threshold of 500 CD4 cells/mu l. Consequently, WHO is currently revising its treatment guidelines and c...
Article
The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that HIV-positive adults start antiretroviral therapy (ART) at CD4 counts
Article
Full-text available
The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends that HIV-positive adults start antiretroviral therapy (ART) at CD4 counts
Article
Full-text available
Background. The use of oral antiretrovirals to prevent HIV infection among HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) has been shown to be safe and efficacious. A large, randomised, placebo-controlled trial showed a 44% reduction in the incidence of HIV infection among MSM receiving a daily oral fixed-dose combination of tenofovir disoproxil fuma...
Article
Full-text available
The previous issue of the SAJHIV (December 2011) carried an Opinion piece by Innes, Cotton and Venter regarding the potential value of low-dose of stavudine (20 mg twice a day). They suggested that reduced dosing of stavudine may lead to levels of viral suppression comparable with those achieved with stavudine 30 mg bd but with a lower risk of toxi...
Article
Full-text available
This forum debate article is in response to the editorial by Professor Ncayiyana concerning the national circumcision programme in South Africa (S Afr Med J 2011;101:775-777). Other articles in this debate: Kessinger and Millard. S Afr Med J 2012;102(3):123-124. Ncayiyana. S Afr Med J 2012;102(3):125-126.
Article
Full-text available
The previous issue of the SAJHIV (December 2011) carried an Opinion piece by Innes, Cotton and Venter regarding the potential value of low-dose of stavudine (20 mg twice a day). They suggested that reduced dosing of stavudine may lead to levels of viral suppression comparable with those achieved with stavudine 30 mg bd but with a lower risk of toxi...
Article
When is the best time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in adults? This is a vital question in HIV treatment and prevention services. More specifically, is the 350 cells/µl CD4 count threshold recommended by current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines sufficient, or should we move to a ‘test-and-treat’ approach in which anyone who tes...
Article
Full-text available
When is the best time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in adults? This is a vital question in HIV treatment and prevention services. More specifically, is the 350 cells/μl CD4 count threshold recommended by current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines sufficient, or should we move to a 'test-and-treat' approach in which anyone who tes...
Article
Full-text available
When is the best time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in adults? This is a vital question in HIV treatment and prevention services. More specifically, is the 350 cells/µl CD4 count threshold recommended by current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines sufficient, or should we move to a ‘test-and-treat’ approach in which anyone who tes...
Article
Tuberculosis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa. HIV infection is often first diagnosed following a diagnosis of tuberculosis, with many patients needing antiretroviral therapy (ART). Starting ART in HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (TB) may be associated with complications, including...
Book
Full-text available
An insider’s view of the state-supported AIDS denial of South African leaders Thabo Mbeki and Manto Shabalala-Msimang, this memoir describes a great triumph of citizen activism. The account begins with the efforts of the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) to rouse public alarm over the puzzling intransigence of the government and the lack of drugs for...
Article
Full-text available
South Africa has started 'rolling out' highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) through the public health sector, but implementation has been slow. Studies have shown that in Africa AIDS prevention may be more cost-effective than providing HAART; such published results provide some support for the South African government's apparent reluctance...
Article
over 300,000 people died because of Mbeki's AIDS denialist policies.3-5 Edward Mabunda was one of them. These studies could not account for additional deaths due to the promotion of quackery, often with the health minister's support. They also did not consider the number of infections that occurred because of the confusion generated by the insipid...
Article
This report addresses the need of scientists and activists to work together in the fight against HIV/AIDS in South Africa. It states that beyond highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) activists in South Africa will need the continued support and assistance of the research community in order to keep their advocacy effective.
Article
Full-text available
In their recent article, "Male circumcision is not the 'vaccine' we have been waiting for!", Green et al. claim that the incorporation of male circumcision (MC) as an additional HIV pre-vention strategy is based on 'incomplete evi-dence, and is premature and ill-advised' [1]. The authors attempt to refute a prior article with a similar title publis...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the irrational actions of Act Up-Paris and some other organisations in recent years. We have written it because their activities are threatening the development of new treatment and prevention technologies for people with HIV. They are also undermining scientific research programmes in developing countries. The groups we disc...
Article
There is a wide clinical spectrum of renal disease in the course of HIV infection, which includes potentially reversible acute renal failure (ARF) (more recently known as acute kidney injury), electrolyte and acid-base disturbances, and intrinsic renal disease unrelated to HIV itself (e.g. co-morbid diabetes mellitus and hypertension).1,2 In additi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The state has a constitutional duty both to increase access to safe, effective, quality medical technologies that prolong or improve life and to protect the public from unproven or dangerous ones. The state is failing to do this adequately for the HIV epidemic. This article explains the structure of the institutions responsible for these tasks and...
Article
Full-text available
This document describes the errors in Celia Farber's March 2006 article in Harper's Magazine, titled Out of Control: AIDS and the Corruption of Medical Science. Our primary concern is with rebutting Farber's misconceptions about HIV/AIDS and antiretrovirals (ARVs). We have not focused our attention on misleading or biased reporting that relate to...
Article
Full-text available
A major factor hampering the rollout of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for HIV/AIDS in the public health sector is state support of pseudo-science. This paper examines state-sponsored pseudo-science in South Africa with a particular focus on the case of Matthias Rath and his claim that HAART is an ineffective and harmful form of tre...
Article
Access to affordable treatment for people infected with HIV m will mean longer and more productive lives for HIV positive people write ANNEKE MEERKOTTER, NATHAN GEFFEN and ELIZE PETOORS

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