Nathan N. Cheek

Nathan N. Cheek
Princeton University | PU · Department of Psychology

About

30
Publications
18,723
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243
Citations

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
We provide a model describing how the narrow prototype of women as having conventionally feminine attributes and identities serves as a barrier to perceiving sexual harassment and appropriately responding to sexual-harassment claims when the victims of harassment do not resemble this prototype. We review research documenting that this narrow protot...
Chapter
This chapter concerns the divergent processes by which people come to know themselves and other people and the resulting consequences. People come to know themselves (or come to gain intrapersonal knowledge ) primarily by looking inward to internal thoughts, feelings, and motives (i.e., by introspecting ). They come to know others (or come to gain...
Article
Hundreds of studies have documented anchoring, whereby people's numerical judgments assimilate to previously considered values. Much less is known, however, about individual differences in susceptibility to anchoring effects. In this study (N = 399), we found that people with stronger verbal reasoning skills and people higher in social autistic ten...
Article
Full-text available
Whether consumers have too little, too much, or the ideal amount of choice can have profound consequences. The present research explores patterns of choice deprivation (having less choice than desired) and choice overload (having more choice than desired) across six choice domains in six countries that together provide home to about half the human...
Preprint
During crises and disasters, such as hurricanes, terrorist threats, or pandemics, policymakers must often increase security at the cost of freedom. Psychological science, however, has shown that the restriction of freedom may have strong negative consequences for behavior and health. We suggest that psychology can inform policy both by elucidating...
Article
Full-text available
The self represents individuals’ understandings of who they are. This entry reviews the distinction between the independent self – the self as unique, private, and separate from others – and the interdependent self – the self as social, public, and connected with others and groups. We review theory and measurement of independent and interdependent...
Article
The self represents individuals’ understandings of who they are. This entry reviews the distinction between the independent self – the self as unique, private, and separate from others – and the interdependent self – the self as social, public, and connected with others and groups. We review theory and measurement of independent and interdependent...
Article
Full-text available
People think that they see things as they are in "objective reality," and they impute bias and other negative qualities to those who disagree. Evidence for these tendencies initially emerged in the domain of politics, where people tend to assume that there are objectively correct beliefs and positions. The present research shows that people are con...
Article
Why do maximizers—those who seek to make the very best choice by exhaustively searching out and comparing alternatives—place such high value on choice in the face of so much regret, dissatisfaction, and stress during the choice process? In five studies (total N = 1479), we drew on the two-component model of maximizing to better understand this maxi...
Article
Full-text available
Anchoring, the assimilation of judgments to previously considered values, is one of the most robust findings in psychology, and researchers have been increasingly interested in finding individual difference moderators of anchoring effects. Several investigations have examined the relation between Big Five traits and anchoring susceptibility, but pr...
Article
Full-text available
We review a program of research on identity orientations – the relative importance or value that individuals place on various identity attributes when constructing their self-definitions. We first provide a brief history of the development of our measure of identity orientations – the Aspects of Identity Questionnaire (AIQ) – after which we present...
Article
Full-text available
Anchoring, whereby judgments assimilate to previously considered standards, is one of the most reliable effects in psychology. In the last decade, researchers have become increasingly interested in identifying moderators of anchoring effects. We argue that a drawback of traditional moderator analyses in the standard anchoring paradigm is that they...
Article
Full-text available
Psychologists from the United States are extremely prominent in psychological science, publishing more articles and receiving more citations than researchers from other nations. In this brief article, I review some previous research on this “nation gap” in psychology and highlight relevant data from journals published by the Association for Psychol...
Article
Full-text available
It is commonly assumed in affluent, Western, democratic societies that by enhancing opportunities for choice, we enhance freedom and well-being, both by enabling people to get exactly what they want and by enabling people to express their identities. In this paper, we review evidence that the relationships between choice, freedom, and well-being ar...
Article
Full-text available
In visual media, men are often shown with more facial prominence than women, a manifestation of sexism that has been labeled face-ism. The present research extended the study of facial prominence and gender representation in media to include magazines aimed at lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) audiences for the first time, and also exa...
Article
Anchoring, whereby people's numerical judgments assimilate to previously considered values, is one of the most robust phenomena in experimental psychology, and previous efforts to identify individual differences in susceptibility to anchoring have met with little overall success. In this study (N = 602), we explored the roles of self-construal and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale (HSNS; Hendin & Cheek, 1997) has become widely used as a measure of covert, vulnerable narcissism. In the original scale construction article, the 10 items were interpreted as forming a single factor based on loadings on the first unrotated factor. More recently, however, researchers studying an Italian translati...
Article
Full-text available
I propose that the increased self-other overlap caused by both perspective taking and perceived perspective taking may, ironically, undermine future attempts at perspective taking, because a greater degree of self-other overlap actually impairs attempts to walk in other people’s shoes.
Article
Full-text available
Can numerical anchors influence people's judgments of their own recent behavior? We investigate this question in a series of six studies. In Study 1, subjects' judgments of how many anagrams they were given assimilated to numerical anchors. Subjects' judgments of how many math problems they correctly solved and how many stairs they had just walked...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cheek, N.N., Cheek, J.M., Grimes, J.O., & Tropp, L.R. (2014, February). Public displays of self: Distinctions among relational, social, and collective aspects of the interdependent self. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, TX. Abstract: See Download [For an updated review of the tetr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Identity orientations refer to the relative importance of various identity attributes in the construction of self-definitions. For Cheek and Briggs (1982), social identity orientation referred to the importance of James’ (1890) social me: one's popularity or social reputation deriving from interpersonal relationships. Abrams (1988), however, critic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The many meanings of introversion complicate attempts to explicate its relation to subclinical expressions of clinical conditions. In a sample of 274 college students, we found that a composite of schizotypy, autism spectrum, and alexithymia measures correlated strongly with anxious introversion, moderately with social introversion, and near-zero w...

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