Nathalie Gosselin

Nathalie Gosselin
Université de Montréal | UdeM · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

51
Publications
22,914
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3,148
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
1274 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Objective To explore a personalized musical intervention's effect on burden of care during dental implants placement. Methods Randomized Controlled Trial in 24 dental implant surgery patients. A personalized music intervention (Music Care© application) or an audiobook control condition was administered. Burden of care (a composite outcome includin...
Article
Full-text available
Sport-related concussion is a serious public health issue affecting millions of individuals each year. Among the many negative side effects, emotional symptoms, such as stress, are some of the most common. Stress management is repeatedly cited by expert groups as an important intervention for this population. It was shown that music has relaxing ef...
Article
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Daily activities can often be performed while listening to music, which could influence the ability to select relevant stimuli while ignoring distractors. Previous studies have established that the level of arousal of music (e.g., relaxing/stimulating) has the ability to modulate mood and affect the performance of cognitive tasks. The aim of this r...
Article
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Music perception deficits are common following acquired brain injury due to stroke, epilepsy surgeries, and aneurysmal clipping. Few studies have examined these deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI), resulting in an under-diagnosis in this population. We aimed to (1) compare TBI patients to controls on pitch and rhythm perception during t...
Article
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Congenital amusia in its most common form is a disorder characterized by a musical pitch processing deficit. Although pitch is involved in conveying emotion in music, the implications for pitch deficits on musical emotion judgements is still under debate. Relatedly, both limited and spared musical emotion recognition was reported in amusia in condi...
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Healthy aging may be accompanied by cognitive decline that includes diminished attentional control, an executive function that allows us to focus our attention while inhibiting distractors. Previous studies have demonstrated that background music can enhance some executive functions in both young and older adults. According to the Arousal-Mood Theo...
Article
This study explores how music training impacts the development of inhibition control, phonological processing, and gross and fine motor skills in preschoolers. In a randomized controlled trial, 160 kindergarteners in a music programme, a motor programme, or a control group were examined. Children in the two experimental conditions took part in 19 w...
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Previous research shows that listening to pleasant, stimulating and familiar music is likely to improve working memory performance. The benefits of music on cognition have been widely studied in Western populations, but not in other cultures. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of music on working memory in a non-Western sociocultur...
Article
Objective: Supervisors in neuropsychology have an ethical responsibility to continuously improve their ability to supervise. Despite a growing interest in the field, there exist little data on the actual practice and few guidelines to help the practitioner through the process of neuropsychology supervision. This study aims to characterize neuropsyc...
Article
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The present study aimed to measure neural information processing underlying emotional recognition from facial expressions in adults having sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) as compared to healthy individuals. We thus measured early (N1, N170) and later (N2) event-related potential (ERP) components during presentation of fearful, neutra...
Article
Objectives: To assess emotion recognition from dynamic facial, vocal and musical expressions in sub-groups of adults with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) of different severities and identify possible common underlying mechanisms across domains. Methods: Forty-one adults participated in this study: 10 with moderate–severe TBI, nine with complicated m...
Chapter
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health problem worldwide. In industrialized societies such as the United States, 500 cases are noted per 100,000 population each year (Saout et al., 2011). In fact, TBI is the leading cause of trauma-related death and disability (Tateno, Jorge, & Robinson, 2003). The number of people who survive TBI has...
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THE PRESENT STUDY INTRODUCES A NOVEL TOOL FOR ASSESSING MUSICAL ABILITIES IN CHILDREN: The Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Musical Abilities (MBEMA). The battery, which comprises tests of memory, scale, contour, interval, and rhythm, was administered to 245 children in Montreal and 91 in Beijing (Experiment 1), and an abbreviated version was admi...
Article
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Pitch deafness, the most commonly known form of congenital amusia, refers to a severe deficit in musical pitch processing (i.e., melody discrimination and recognition) that can leave time processing-including rhythm, metre, and "feeling the beat"-preserved. In Experiment 1, we show that by presenting musical excerpts in nonpitched drum timbres, rat...
Article
dementia of the alzheimer type (ad) can affect emotional judgments of facial expression and prosody. Spared emotional judgments of music have been observed in early AD (Gagnon, Peretz, & Fülöp, 2009). The AD case study of Cuddy and Duffin (2005) showed relatively spared perception and memory for music. Through the single case study of MD, we again...
Article
The acquisition of both speech and music uses general principles: learners extract statistical regularities present in the environment. Yet, individuals who suffer from congenital amusia (commonly called tone-deafness) have experienced lifelong difficulties in acquiring basic musical skills, while their language abilities appear essentially intact....
Article
Deficits for pitch structure processing in congenital amusia has been mostly reported for melodic stimuli and explicit judgments. The present study investigated congenital amusia with harmonic stimuli and a priming task. Amusic and control participants performed a speeded phoneme discrimination task on sung chord sequences. The target phoneme was s...
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Emotional recognition appears to play a key role in relationships. Indeed, the ability to interpret emotions in the environment allows individuals to anticipate certain intentions or situations, and to respond to them in an appropriate fashion. Difficulties in psychosocial functioning (e.g., job loss, disruption of intimate relationships, reduced s...
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Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder that affects music processing and that is ascribed to a deficit in pitch processing. We investigated whether this deficit extended to pitch processing in speech, notably the pitch changes used to contrast lexical tones in tonal languages. Congenital amusics and matched controls, all non-tonal language sp...
Article
We have shown that an anteromedial temporal lobe resection can impair the recognition of scary music in a prior study (Gosselin et al., 2005). In other studies (Adolphs et al., 2001; Anderson et al., 2000), similar results have been obtained with fearful facial expressions. These findings suggest that scary music and fearful faces may be processed...
Article
Humans move to the beat of music. Despite the ubiquity and early emergence of this response, some individuals report being unable to feel the beat in music. We report a sample of people without special training, all of whom were proficient at perceiving and producing the musical beat with the exception of one case ("Mathieu"). Motion capture and ps...
Poster
Full-text available
Please refer to: Gosselin, N., Paquette, S., & Peretz, I. (2015). Sensitivity to musical emotions in congenital amusia. Cortex, 71, 171-182.
Article
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A small number of individuals have severe musical problems that have neuro-genetic underpinnings. This musical disorder is termed "congenital amusia," an umbrella term for lifelong musical disabilities that cannot be attributed to deafness, lack of exposure, or brain damage after birth. Amusics seem to lack the ability to detect fine pitch differen...
Article
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Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder of music processing that is currently ascribed to a deficit in pitch processing. A recent study challenges this view and claims the disorder might arise as a consequence of a general spatial-processing deficit. Here, we assessed spatial processing abilities in two independent samples of individuals with...
Article
Successful recognition of a familiar tune depends on a selection procedure that takes place in a memory system that contains all the representations of the specific musical phrases to which one has been exposed during one's lifetime. We refer to this memory system as the musical lexicon. The goal of the study was to identify its neural correlates....
Article
We examined memory for pitch in congenital amusia in two tasks. In one task, we varied the pitch distance between the target and comparison tone from 4 to 9 semitones and inserted either a silence or 6 interpolated tones between the tones to be compared. In a second task, we manipulated the number of pitches to be retained in sequences of length 1,...
Article
Persons with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) are impaired in recognizing emotions from face and voice. Yet clinical practitioners use these mediums to communicate with DAT patients. Music is also used in clinical practice, but little is known about emotional processing from music in DAT. This study aims to assess emotional recognition in mild...
Article
Twenty amusic and 20 control speakers of French were presented with pairs of Mandarin lexical tones to discriminate as same or different. Results revealed that even if the amusic group performed significantly below the control group, the scores of the two groups largely overlapped, with only 15% of the amusic group performing outside the normal var...
Article
It has long been debated which aspects of music perception are universal and which are developed only after exposure to a specific musical culture. Here, we report a crosscultural study with participants from a native African population (Mafa) and Western participants, with both groups being naive to the music of the other respective culture. Exper...
Article
The issue of emotional feelings to music is the object of a classic debate in music psychology. Emotivists argue that emotions are really felt in response to music, whereas cognitivists believe that music is only representative of emotions. Psychophysiological recordings of emotional feelings to music might help to resolve the debate, but past stud...
Article
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Three experiments were conducted in order to validate 56 musical excerpts that conveyed four intended emotions (happiness, sadness, threat and peacefulness). In Experiment 1, the musical clips were rated in terms of how clearly the intended emotion was portrayed, and for valence and arousal. In Experiment 2, a gating paradigm was used to evaluate t...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, we pointed out that a small number of individuals fail to acquire basic musical abilities, and that these deficiencies might have neuronal and genetic underpinnings. Such a musical disorder is now termed "congenital amusia," an umbrella term for lifelong musical disabilities that cannot be attributed to mental retardation, deafness, or la...
Article
The role of the amygdala in recognition of danger is well established for visual stimuli such as faces. A similar role in another class of emotionally potent stimuli -- music -- has been recently suggested by the study of epileptic patients with unilateral resection of the anteromedian part of the temporal lobe [Gosselin, N., Peretz, I., Noulhiane,...
Article
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Our study investigated with an implicit method (i.e., priming paradigm) whether I.R. - a brain-damaged patient exhibiting severe amusia - processes implicitly musical structures. The task consisted in identifying one of two phonemes (Experiment 1) or timbres (Experiment 2) on the last chord of eight-chord sequences (i.e., target). The targets were...
Article
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Music is typically a pleasurable experience. But under certain circumstances, music can also be unpleasant, for example, when a young child randomly hits piano keys. Such unpleasant musical experiences have been shown to activate a network of brain structures involved in emotion, mostly located in the medial temporal lobe: the parahippocampal gyrus...
Article
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Music constitutes an ideal means to create a sense of suspense in films. However, there has been minimal investigation into the underlying cerebral organization for perceiving danger created by music. In comparison, the amygdala's role in recognition of fear in non-musical contexts has been well established. The present study sought to fill this ga...
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Do children use the same properties as adults in determining whether music sounds happy or sad? We addressed this question with a set of 32 excerpts (16 happy and 16 sad) taken from pre-existing music. The tempo (i.e. the number of beats per minute) and the mode (i.e. the specific subset of pitches used to write a given musical excerpt) of these ex...
Article
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To directly compare the performance of patients with schizophrenia and control subjects on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Specifically, we sought to verify if there are significant differences on the "classical" WCST measurements (perseverative errors and number of categories), as well as on more rarely reported scores, and assess the exte...
Article
Although many studies have indicated information processing deficits in schizophrenic patients, the precise nature and underlying causes of these deficits remain largely uncertain. One prominent hypothesis is that these patients show insufficient attentional inhibition. This deficit to inhibition has been linked to certain cognitive disorders in sc...

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