Natasha Reynolds

Natasha Reynolds
University of Bordeaux · PACEA (UMR 5199)

About

30
Publications
11,167
Reads
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317
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
317 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Additional affiliations
February 2018 - January 2020
University of Bordeaux
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2016 - January 2018
University of Bordeaux
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - January 2016
University of Oxford
Position
  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/antiquity/article/kostenki-18-child-burial-and-the-cultural-and-funerary-landscape-of-mid-upper-palaeolithic-european-russia/2898D65F52A1A9FCA670F151AD8C5CA3 Palaeolithic burials are few and far between, and establishing their chronology is crucial to gaining a broader understanding of the period. A new prog...
Preprint
Full-text available
Several questions remain regarding the timing and nature of the Neanderthal-anatomically modern human (AMH) transition in Europe. The situation in Eastern Europe is generally less clear due to the relatively few sites and a dearth of reliable radiocarbon dates. Claims have been made for both notably early AMH and notably late Neanderthal presence,...
Article
Full-text available
The site of Kostënki 21 (also known as Gmelin or Gmelinskaia) is located on the very edge of the Don River at Kostënki (Voronezh Oblast, Russia). The main archaeological horizon, layer III, is dated to c. 23,000-21,000 14 C BP (c. 27,500-24,500 cal BP) and contained six concentrations of archaeological material, mostly interpreted as the remains of...
Article
Full-text available
A fundamental element of Upper Palaeolithic archaeological practice is cultural taxonomy—the definition and description of taxonomic units that group assemblages according to their material culture and geographic and chronological distributions. The derived taxonomies, such as Aurignacian, Gravettian and Magdalenian, are used as units of analysis i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Manuscript version of: Reynolds, N. (in press). Threading the weft, testing the warp: population concepts and the European Upper Paleolithic chronocultural framework. In: H.S. Groucutt (Ed.), Culture History and Convergent Evolution: Can we Detect Populations in Prehistory? Springer, Cham, Switzerland.
Article
The article is devoted to the results of archaeological excavations carried out on the Sungir in 2014-2015. The main purpose of these works was to obtain new data on the spatial structure of the cultural layer of the Sungir site. The relevance of these studies is caused by still unsolved question of whether Sungir can be considered as a site with a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Middle and Upper Palaeolithic sites, where mammoths dominate the faunal assemblages, are mainly found in Central and Eastern Europe. At these sites concentrations of skulls, tusks and long bones, interpreted as deliberate constructions, often occur. Rare instances of weapon tip fragments embedded in mammoth bones provide direct archaeological evide...
Article
Full-text available
The Kostenki-Borshchevo site complex (Voronezh region, Russia) serves as the foundation of Eastern Europe’s Upper Paleolithic chronocultural framework. Here we present new radiocarbon dates for three Kostenki sites. Dates of ∼27.5–27 ka BP for Kostenki 15 suggest that its archaeological layer accumulated over a short period. These results help to c...
Article
Full-text available
The Streletskian is central to understanding the onset of the Upper Palaeolithic on the East European Plain. Early Streletskian assemblages are frequently seen as marking the Neanderthal-anatomically modern human (AMH) anthropological transition, as well as the Middle-to-Upper Palaeolithic archaeological transition. The age of key Streletskian asse...
Article
Kostënki 9 is a small Gravettian site in the Kostënki-Borshchëvo area of Russia, known for a highly homogeneous assemblage of ventrally truncated backed bladelets, as well as the presence of ground stone artefacts. The site was mainly excavated during the twentieth century but in recent years small-scale work has begun again at the site. Until now...
Chapter
Interpretations of the European Upper Paleolithic archaeological record have long relied on concepts of past populations. In particular, cultural taxonomic units—which are used as a framework for describing the archaeological record—are commonly equated with past populations. However, our cultural taxonomy is highly historically contingent, and doe...
Article
Full-text available
Report on the 1st CLIOARCH workshop on cultural taxonomies in the Palaeolithic
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The purpose of the report is to revise the understanding of the age, duration of existence and assemblage homogeneity of key Streletskian sites at Kostёnki based on the lithics study and new radiocarbon dates.
Article
Full-text available
Reply to responses by John Shea, Eleanor Scerri and Ben Marwick on our paper House of cards: cultural taxonomy and the study of the European Upper Palaeolithic. Original paper available here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/336553929_House_of_cards_cultural_taxonomy_and_the_study_of_the_European_Upper_Palaeolithic Responses by other col...
Article
The causes of major archaeological transitions during the Upper Palaeolithic, such as the Aurignacian-Gravettian transition, remain poorly understood. In an effort to distinguish between demic and cultural diffusionary explanations for such transitions, analyses of radiocarbon and spatial data are sometimes employed. Here, we attempt to replicate a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Session description: The UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in 2015 led to the historic Paris Agreement to limit global average temperature rise to 2°C and pursue efforts to keep it to 1.5°C. According to the special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on limiting warming to 1.5°C, released in October 2018, the world h...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Session description: Lithic artefacts are a principal source of information for reconstructing the cultural traditions, movement, behaviours and diets of Palaeolithic and Mesolithic people. While it is generally assumed that these artefacts were designed and used to carry out a wide range of specific tasks, in most cases we know little about the pr...
Article
Full-text available
Free-to-read link: rdcu.be/Iq0K Comment on Režek et al., 2018, Nature Ecology & Evolution.
Article
Full-text available
Triangular, concave-base ‘Streletskian points’ are documented in several assemblages from the Kostёnki complex of Upper Palaeolithic sites in south-western Russia. Some of these assemblages have been argued to evidence very early modern human occupation of Eastern Europe. However, Streletskian points are also recorded from younger contexts, notably...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Call for papers for session to be held at EAA 2018, Barcelona, 5-8 September.
Article
Full-text available
Here we document striking platform preparation at the Upper Palaeolithic site of Sungir' (Vladimir Oblast, Russia) comparable to the en éperon (spurring) technique. Its employment has resulted in butts with particularly large and wide spurs. Such preparation was apparently used during creation and maintenance of blade debitage surfaces, but not dur...
Article
Conscious of the difficulty of reliably dating Pleistocene-age bone we re-examine the British record of radiocarbon-dated fauna from mid-to-late Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 and early MIS 2, largely known from carnivore accumulations at cave sites. Although the data does not allow for firm conclusions, some observations can be made. An apparent dea...
Article
Full-text available
It is now well established that many previously obtained radiocarbon dates for the earlier part of the Upper Palaeolithic are problematic, and that archaeological chronologies based on such dates may require revision. In order to help address this problem for the Gravettian of European Russia, eight new radiocarbon dates were obtained on samples of...
Article
A survey of the caves of Bishopston Valley, Gower, published previously in Cave and Karst Science (2010: Vol.37, No.2), identified cave sites with the potential to contain archaeological material within their sedimentary deposits, and assessed the conservation status of these sites. Two caves – Ogof Ci Coch and Valley Side Cave 1 – showed clear sig...

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Project (1)
Project
Revising the chronocultural framework of the Gravettian sites of Russia.