Natasha Barbolini

Natasha Barbolini
University of Bergen | UiB · Department of Biological Science

PhD

About

26
Publications
14,553
Reads
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336
Citations
Introduction
My primary research interests include the holistic reconstruction of extinct ecosystems, and investigating the differing responses of plants and animals to environmental crises. I enjoy working with multi-disciplinary teams, combining palynological data with palaeobotanical and faunal records in order to best understand past ecosystem dynamics. This research is important for providing a perspective on current and future global climate changes.
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - February 2021
Stockholm University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2017 - October 2018
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2014 - March 2017
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • Fellow
Education
January 2010 - February 2014
University of the Witwatersrand
Field of study
  • Palynology

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies suggest increasing sensitivity to orbital variations across the Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse to icehouse climate transition. However, climate simulations and paleoenvironmental studies mostly provide snapshots of the past climate, therefore overlooking the role of this short-term variability in driving major environmental changes and...
Article
Full-text available
The Miocene epoch (23.03-5.33 Ma) was a time interval of global warmth, relative to today. Continental configurations and mountain topography transitioned toward modern conditions, and many flora and fauna evolved into the same taxa that exist today. Miocene climate was dynamic: long periods of early and late glaciation bracketed a ∼2 Myr greenhous...
Article
Full-text available
The Miocene epoch (23.03–5.33 Ma) was a time interval of global warmth, relative to today. Continental configurations and mountain topography transitioned toward modern conditions, and many flora and fauna evolved into the same taxa that exist today. Miocene climate was dynamic: long periods of early and late glaciation bracketed a ∼2 Myr greenhous...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient lake deposits preserve detailed records of Cenozoic environmental changes, providing information on past climate, vegetation, precipitation and lake chemistry. This study focuses on palaeoenvironmental changes recorded in Eocene limnic environments across what is today the modern Tibetan Plateau. We describe a section dated as late Eocene (...
Article
Full-text available
Asian mineral dust has been studied extensively for its role in affecting regional-to global-scale climate and for its deposits, which enable reconstructing Asian atmospheric circulation in the past. However, the timing and origin of the dust deposits remain debated. Numerous loess records have been reported across the Asian continent with ages var...
Article
Full-text available
Sporopollenin is a highly resistant biopolymer that forms the outer wall of pollen and spores (sporomorphs). Recent research into sporopollenin chemistry has opened up a range of new avenues for palynological research, including chemotaxonomic classification of morphologically cryptic taxa. However, there have been limited attempts to directly inte...
Article
Full-text available
Central Asia experienced a number of significant elevational and climatic changes during the Cenozoic, but much remains to be understood regarding the timing and driving mechanisms of these changes as well as their influence on ancient ecosystems. Here, we describe the palaeoecology and palaeoclimate of a new section from the Nangqian Basin in Tibe...
Article
Full-text available
The first major build-up of Antarctic glaciation occurred in two consecutive stages across the Eocene–Oligocene transition (EOT): the EOT-1 cooling event at ~34.1–33.9 Ma and the Oi-1 glaciation event at ~33.8–33.6 Ma. Detailed orbital-scale terrestrial environmental responses to these events remain poorly known. Here we present magnetic and geoche...
Article
Full-text available
The origins and development of the arid and highly seasonal steppe-desert biome in Central Asia, the largest of its kind in the world, remain largely unconstrained by existing records. It is unclear how Cenozoic climatic, geological, and biological forces, acting at diverse spatial and temporal scales, shaped Central Asian ecosystems through time....
Article
Soil respiration (Rs), the production of carbon dioxide in soils, increases dramatically from deserts to forested ecosystems. Rs values thus provide a potential tool to identify past ecosystems if recorded in sedimentary archives. Here, we propose a quantitative method to reconstruct past Rs values from paleosols. This method reverses the soil pale...
Preprint
Full-text available
Central Asia experienced a number of significant elevational and climatic changes during the Cenozoic, but much remains to be understood regarding the timing and driving mechanisms of these changes, as well as their influence on ancient ecosystems. Here we describe the palaeoecology and palaeoclimate of a new section from the Nangqian Basin in Tibe...
Article
The proto‐Paratethys Sea covered a vast area extending from the Mediterranean Tethys to the Tarim Basin in western China during Cretaceous and early Paleogene. Climate modelling and proxy studies suggest that Asian aridification has been governed by westerly moisture modulated by fluctuations of the proto‐Paratethys Sea. Transgressive and regressiv...
Article
The fall into the Oligocene icehouse is marked by a steady decline in global temperature with punctuated cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene transition, both of which are well documented in the marine realm. However, the chronology and mechanisms of cooling on land remain unclear. Here, we use clumped isotope thermometry on northeastern Tibetan contine...
Article
The paper “Marine flooding surfaces recorded in Permian black shales and coal deposits of the Main Karoo Basin (South Africa): implications for basin dynamics and cross-basin correlation” by Götz et al. (2017) correlates the Whitehill Formation with the No. 5 coal seam on a reported prasinophyte/acritarch spike, which the authors claim indicates a...
Article
The main Karoo Basin (MKB), internationally renowned for its wealth of fossil tetrapods, has been lithostratigraphically subdivided into three discrete regions: two (east and west) proximal facies adjacent to the Cape Fold Belt, and a distal facies, away from the Cape Fold Belt. Because of lithological differences between formations of the proximal...
Chapter
The nonmarine Permo-Jurassic deposits of the Karoo Supergroup of South Africa have long been a world standard for tetrapod biostratigraphy. Recent and ongoing research is revising the palaeoflora and palaeofauna of these sedimentary strata with an unprecedented level of stratigraphic precision. This work has shown that: Permian palynomorphs are use...
Article
Full-text available
The well-refined Permian palynozonation of Western and eastern Australia is the current standard biostratigraphic scheme for the Southern Hemisphere, but intra-Gondwanan floristic provincialism means that several stratigraphically useful palynomorph taxa are rare or absent elsewhere in Gondwana. Radio-isotopic ages for both Australia and the main K...
Article
Full-text available
Permian and Triassic deposits in Zambia have been sporadically researched since the beginning of the 20th century, but there have not been many detailed works on the palaeobotany and palynology of these Karoo-aged rocks. Studies that have been published, suffered from a lack of inter-basinal correlation, which was also hampered by differing stratig...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Investigating the Cretaceous–Eocene palynology of western China and NE Tibet, modeling plateau uplift, and identifying global hyperthermal and cooling events reflected in the Asian palynological record.
Project
Utilising the Karoo palynological record to quantify extinction events, understand deep-time changes in ancient ecosystems, and aid in the refinement of basin development models for the Karoo and other Gondwana basins. A key component of the research is employing radio-isotopic dating methods to link late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic palynostratigraphic zones to the International Geological Timescale.
Project
Lake Nam Co represents one of the largest and deepest lakes (100 m) on the Tibetan Plateau that supplies water to one third of the world’s population. Due to its location, paleoclimate proxies reflect the spatial and temporal development of large-scale atmospheric circulation systems. Multiproxy studies on a 10.4 m long reference core provided a high-resolution paleoenvironmental record covering the past 24 cal ka BP with proxies that have been validated by extensive modern process studies. A comprehensive set of pre-site survey seismic data show an infill of >800 m of well-layered undisturbed sediments in the central part of the lake, likely spanning several glacial/interglacial cycles. Sediment accumulation rates measured on the reference core and seismostratigraphic investigations suggest an age of the lake formation of >1 Mio years. The Tibetan Plateau is also characterized by a high degree of endemism of organisms that are dependent on continuously existing water bodies. Nam Co likely served as a dispersal center for these organisms, as most other lakes desiccated during dry glacial periods of the Cenozoic. Nam Co appears to be a first class example for studying the link between geological and biological evolution in highly isolated Tibetan Plateau ecosystems including the deep biosphere over long time scales. A continuous, high-resolution, record for these long time scales from Nam Co can be recovered by drilling to study sediment budget changes under varying climatic and tectonic settings, and contribute to a better understanding of the Quaternary geomagnetic field. Members of the international scientific community interested should either contact T. Haberzettl (torsten.haberzettl@uni-greifswald.de) or Liping Zhu (lpzhu@itpcas.ac.cn).