Natalya Gomez

Natalya Gomez
McGill University | McGill · Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

About

24
Publications
2,268
Reads
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1,136
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
649 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Additional affiliations
September 2009 - December 2013
Harvard University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Erosion and deposition can perturb regional sea level significantly by altering the Earth's surface and by redistributing mass. However, no studies have investigated the importance of these geomorphic processes for glacial settings on glacial-interglacial time scales, despite large erosion rates and the inherent importance of sea-level changes for...
Article
Full-text available
Seismic tomography models indicate highly variable Earth structure beneath Antarctica with anomalously low shallow mantle viscosities below West Antarctica. An improved projection of the contribution of the Antarctic Ice Sheet to sea‐level change requires consideration of this complexity to precisely account for water expelled into the ocean from u...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) modelling in the cryosphere is required for interpreting satellite, geophysical and geological records and for assessing the feedbacks of Earth deformation and sea-level change on marine ice-sheet grounding lines. GIA modelling in areas of active ice loss in West Antarctica is particularly challenging bec...
Article
Earth structure beneath the Antarctic exerts an important control on the evolution of the ice sheet. A range of geological and geophysical datasets indicate that this structure is complex, with the western sector characterized by a lithosphere of thickness ∼50-100 km and viscosities within the upper mantle that vary by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Rece...
Article
Prior to inferring ice sheet stability from past interglacial sea-level records, these records must first be corrected for the contaminating effects of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Typical GIA corrections, however, neglect variability in the signal that may be introduced by Earth's 3-D rheological structure. We predict sea-level changes due...
Preprint
Full-text available
Accurate glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) modeling in the cryosphere is required for interpreting satellite, geophysical and geological records and to assess the feedbacks of Earth deformation and sea level change on marine ice-sheet grounding lines. Assessing GIA in areas of active ice loss in West Antarctica is particularly challenging because...
Article
The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) overlies a thin, variable-thickness lithosphere and a shallow upper-mantle region of laterally varying and, in some regions, very low (~10 ¹⁸ Pa s) viscosity. We explore the extent to which viscous effects may affect predictions of present-day geoid and crustal deformation rates resulting from Antarctic ice mass...
Article
A gravitationally self-consistent, global sea level model with 3D viscoelastic Earth structure is interactively coupled to a 3D dynamic ice sheet model, and the coupled model is applied to simulate the evolution of ice cover, sea level changes, and solid Earth deformation over the last deglaciation, from 40 ka to the modern. The results show that i...
Article
Full-text available
In 1905 and 1906, the Cree of the southwestern James Bay region signed Treaty No. 9 whereby they relinquished to the Canadian government their claim to the lands south of the Albany River (the northern boundary of the province of Ontario at the time). The official text of Treaty No. 9 made no mention of land submerged below water cover, and thus th...
Article
Full-text available
The stability of marine sectors of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) in a warming climate has been identified as the largest source of uncertainty in projections of future sea-level rise. Sea-level fall near the grounding line of a retreating marine ice sheet has a stabilizing influence on the ice sheets, and previous studies have established the impor...
Article
Models of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet predict substantial ice loss over the next few centuries - and that a glacier expected to contribute greatly to sea-level rise may already be unstable.
Article
The source or sources of meltwater pulse 1A (MWP-1A) at ~14.5 ka, recorded at widely distributed sites as a sea level rise of ~10–20 m in less than 500 years, is uncertain. A recent ice modeling study of North America and Greenland has suggested that the collapse of an ice saddle between the Laurentide and Cordilleran ice sheets, with a eustatic se...
Article
We present results from a three-dimensional ice sheet-shelf model of Antarctica, coupled to a gravitationally self-consistent global sea-level model that incorporates (Maxwell) viscoelastic deformation of the solid Earth. The coupled model captures complex post-glacial changes in sea level associated with the gravitational, deformational and rotati...
Article
We investigate the stability of marine ice sheets by coupling a gravitationally self-consistent sea level model valid for a self-gravitating, viscoelastically deforming Earth to a 1-D marine ice sheet-shelf model. The evolution of the coupled model is explored for a suite of simulations in which we vary the bed slope and the forcing that initiates...
Article
The rapid melting of the Earth's ice reservoirs will produce geographically distinct patterns of sea level change that have come to be known as sea level fingerprints. A basic, gravitationally self-consistent theory for computing these patterns appeared in the 1970s; however, recent, highly discrepant fingerprint calculations have led to suggestion...
Article
Full-text available
We connected youth of the Mushkegowuk Territory (specifically Fort Albany First Nation) with environmental science and technology mentors in an outreach program contextualized to subarctic Ontario that addressed some of the environmental concerns identified by members of Fort Albany First Nation. Most activities were community-based centering on th...
Article
An instability mechanism is widely predicted for marine ice sheets resting upon reversed bed slopes. In this case, ice-sheet thinning or rising sea level is thought to lead to irreversible retreat of the grounding line (e.g., Weertman, J. Glaciol., 1974; Schoof, JGR, 2007). Previous analyses of marine ice-sheet stability have considered the influen...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change could potentially destabilize marine ice sheets, which would affect projections of future sea-level rise. Specifically, an instability mechanism has been predicted for marine ice sheets such as the West Antarctic ice sheet that rest on reversed bed slopes, whereby ice-sheet thinning or rising sea level leads to irreversible retreat o...
Article
Full-text available
Mitrovica et al. (2005), following calculations by Nakada (2002), demonstrated that the traditional approach for computing rotation perturbations driven by glacial isostatic adjustment significantly overestimates present-day true polar wander (TPW) speeds by underestimating the background oblateness on which the ice-age loading is superimposed. The...
Article
We present gravitationally self-consistent predictions of sea level change that would follow the disappearance of either the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) or marine sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Our predictions are based on a state-of-the-art pseudo-spectral sea level algorithm that incorporates deformational, gravitational and...
Article
Sea-level changes in response to the rapid melting of individual ice sheets or mountain glaciers are characterized by distinct geometries that have come to be known as fingerprints. We examine the sensitivity of these fingerprints to a variety of model inputs, including the detailed geometry of the ice sheet mass balance. For example, we compare fi...
Article
When Rupert's Land and the North-Western Territory became a part of Canada as the Northwest Territories in 1870, the islands of James Bay were included within the new territorial boundaries. These same islands became a part of Nunavut in 1999, when the new territory was created from the eastern region of the Northwest Territories. Although the Jame...
Article
Full-text available
Recent projections of sea-level rise after a future collapse of theWest Antarctic Ice Sheet (for example, the Fourth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report) assume that meltwater will spread uniformly (that is, eustatically) across the oceans once marine-based sectors of the West Antarctic are filled. A largely neglected 1977 s...

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