Natalie Kramer

Natalie Kramer
Dipper and Spruce LLC

PhD

About

29
Publications
11,338
Reads
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560
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
498 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
I explore rivers intellectually as a scientist and physically as a professional whitewater kayaker. My broad goal is to study and document rivers so that society can sustainably manage global waterways. My research niche is studying driftwood along rivers and shorelines. I am broadly attracted to projects which seek to develop creative ways to acquire and analyze data to solve problems and to big picture syntheses of physical processes. I also love sharing, mentoring and teaching.
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - present
Dipper and Spruce LLC
Position
  • Co-founder
November 2016 - October 2017
Utah State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Fluvial geomorphologist integrating ecological and physical data throughout the headwaters of the Columbia Basin to aid in the recovery and management of salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest.
August 2013 - May 2014
Colorado State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Optical Mineralogy and Historical Geology Lab Instructor
Education
August 2012 - December 2015
Colorado State University
Field of study
  • Geosciences
August 2008 - December 2011
Colorado State University
Field of study
  • Geosciences
January 2005 - May 2007
Humboldt State University
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
To effectively manage wood in rivers, we need a better understanding of wood mobility within river networks. Here, we review primarily field-based (and some numerical) studies of wood transport. We distinguish small, medium, large, and great rivers based on wood piece dimensions relative to channel and flow dimensions and dominant controls on wood...
Article
Full-text available
Instream and floodplain wood can provide many benefits to river ecosystems, but can also create hazards for inhabitants, infrastructure, property, and recreational users in the river corridor. We propose a decision process for managing large wood, and particularly for assessing the relative benefits and hazards associated with individual wood piece...
Article
Full-text available
This research demonstrates how vegetation interacts with physical processes to govern landscape development. We quantify and describe interactions among driftwood, sedimentation, and vegetation for Great Slave Lake, which is used as proxy for shoreline dynamics and landforms before deforestation and wood removal along major waterways. We introduce...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring large wood (LW: width > 10 cm, length > 1 m) in transport within rivers is a necessary next step in the development and refinement of wood budgets and is essential to a better understanding of basin-wide controls and patterns of LW flux and loads. Monitoring LW transport with coarse interval (≥ 1 min) time-lapse photography enables the d...
Article
Full-text available
Beavers, once abundant and widespread in the Northern Hemisphere, are now substantially reduced. Although beaver dams trap sediment, the relative importance of this sediment in Quaternary valley aggradation remains uncertain. We use ground penetrating radar (GPR) and near-surface seismic refraction to quantify the magnitude of beaver-induced Holoce...
Chapter
Large rivers of the North American arctic and subarctic remain among the least‐altered large rivers in the world, and thus provide opportunities that no longer exist within temperate latitudes to investigate and understand large‐river process and form in the absence of human manipulations. The Mackenzie and Yukon Rivers are the largest arctic/subar...
Article
Many geomorphologists who are mothers find it challenging to balance field research alongside pregnancy and caring for young children. We offer perspectives on the challenges to conducting fieldwork as mothers and possible solutions, as a means of promoting conversations and highlighting issues that are less commonly considered in field‐based geomo...
Article
Porosity, or void space, of large wood jams in stream systems has implications for estimating wood volumes and carbon storage, the impacts of jams on geomorphic and ecological processes, and instream habitat. Estimating porosity and jam dimensions (i.e., jam volume) in the field is a common method of measuring wood volume in jams. However, very few...
Article
The importance of large wood (LW) to riverine functions is well established scientifically and increasingly recognized by river managers in many countries. However, public perceptions largely associate LW with elevated danger and/or need for intervention. Such perspectives are amplified amongst recreational river users (defined here as any individu...
Article
River restoration practice frequently employs conservative designs that create and maintain prescribed, static morphology. Such approaches ignore an emerging understanding of resilient river systems that typically adjust their morphology in response to hydrologic, vegetative and sediment supply changes. As such, using increased dynamism as a restor...
Article
We use sub-daily gage records from montane headwater channels in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico (tropical rainforest) and the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest of Oregon (temperate rainforest) to characterize differences in discharge pulses (rapid, high-magnitude discharge fluctuations) and determine whether the characteristics of dis...
Article
Full-text available
The natural wood regime forms the third leg of a tripod of physical processes that supports river science and management, along with the natural flow and sediment regimes. The wood regime consists of wood recruitment, transport, and storage in river corridors. Each of these components can be characterized in terms of magnitude, frequency, rate, tim...
Article
Large wood (LW) jams are key riverine habitat features that affect hydraulic processes and aquatic habitat. The hydraulic influence of LW jams is poorly understood due to the complexity of fluid dynamics around irregular, porous structures. Here we validated a method for two-dimensional hydraulic modeling of porous LW jams using the open-source mod...
Poster
Full-text available
This paper shows example applications of the Geomorphic Unit Tool, which is a GIS algorithm that will map geomorphic units from high resolution topography. Documentation and code can be viewed and downloaded from https://github.com/Riverscapes/pyGUT.
Poster
Full-text available
Instream geomorphic units (GUs) are landforms at the 1 to 10 m scale that exhibit similar morphometric and hydraulic parameters. Moreover, GUs are a key scale for understanding aquatic organism-habitat relationships. Delineation of GUs is typically carried out in the field or as manual desktop exercise. However, both of these approaches often suffe...
Article
Full-text available
This study presents a case study of large wood transport on the great Slave River in northern Canada with the objective to better understand the processes of and variability in pulsed wood fluxes from large forested catchments. We use a varied approach, integrating field characterization of wood, historical anecdotes, repeat aerial imagery of store...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In regions with emerging economies, remote mountain rivers are increasingly threated by large-scale dams and hydropower projects. Development decisions are often made without critical baseline data that is needed to evaluate potential ecosystem vulnerability and manage future river system sustainability. In the summer of 2015, we initiated a survey...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Floods often generate large amounts of drift wood in rivers, especially in mountainous areas. Wood can block the flow of the river and create over-flooding on adjacent lands usually not submitted to flooding. Moreover, wood can block structures such as bridges or dams, risking damage to towns and infrastructure. When wood is cleared or captured (us...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Greater awareness of geomorphic and aquatic habitat values of instream woody debris over the last two decades has led to its increasing usage in river restoration actions. Recreational river traffic has boomed over the last 50 years during a period of historic low levels of instream woody debris abundance. Safety concerns regarding instream wood pl...
Thesis
Full Text: https://dspace.library.colostate.edu/bitstream/handle/10217/176648/Kramer_colostate_0053A_13680.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y Abstract: Downed wood is a resource easily utilized by plants and animals from the forests to the sea and is essential for many ecosystems. The diverse benefits that wood brings to streams and riparian corridors are...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Measuring the volume of wood in logjams and accumulations is important for ecological applications and wood and carbon budgets. Porosity is difficult to estimate. We compare methods to estimate porosity and wood volumes of logjams across three field sites: the Colorado Rocky Mountains in the USA, Northern Canada, and interior Alaska.
Conference Paper
Islands and shorelines near the Slave River Delta on the Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories, Canada, are enlarging over time directly due to accretion of large, successive parallel berms or mats of driftwood (driftcretions). This study describes wood accretion processes on the leeward and windward sides of islands and on the shores of protecte...
Thesis
Full-text available
This study used ~1 km of near-surface seismic refraction (SSR) data and ~6 km of ground penetrating radar (GPR) data to infer the impact of Holocene beaver activity on sediment aggradation in Beaver Meadows, Rocky Mountain National Park. GPR data were used to uniquely identify radar packages of genetically related strata corresponding to glacial, n...
Conference Paper
NS41B-1515 This study is one of the first to use near surface geophysical techniques to characterize the subsurface stratigraphy in a high alpine, low gradient valley with a past glacial history and to obtain a preliminary grasp on the impact of Holocene beaver activity. Approximately 1 km of seismic refraction data and 5 km of GPR data were collec...
Conference Paper
Investigations that analyze sediment packages and the processes associated with their deposition are integral for identifying the historic range of variablity at a site. Near-surface geophysical techniques make it possible to infer sediment packages within the Holocene which are not exposed at the surface. This study uses ground penetrating radar (...

Network

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
Scientists are bringing their field work into their labs and computers by taking high resolution images in the field and then analyzing them back at the office. This detailed data still needs to be classified, clustered and made sense of in order to answer meaningful scientific inquiries. This grouping of my work seeks to facilitate consistent mapping of the fluvial environment, whether it be data extraction methods in the field or on the computer.
Project
The goal of the riverscapes assessment work is to develop tools and analytical techniques for mapping, modeling and assessing riverscapes across multiple spatial scales (ranging from hydraulic and geomorphic units to entire drainage networks).