Nanda de Knegt

Nanda de Knegt
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam | VU · Department of Clinical Neuropsychology

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15
Publications
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Publications

Publications (15)
Chapter
People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have both intellectual and adaptive deficits resulting from genetic or medical disorders. Although scientific and clinical awareness has emerged that atypical pain responses in ID do not necessarily reflect pain insensitivity or indifference, pain assessment is still hampered by the risk of incorrect inter...
Chapter
Zelfverwonding: Een interdisciplinaire aanpak van ernstig en aanhoudend zelfverwondend gedrag bij mensen met een matige tot zeer ernstige verstandelijke beperking [Self-injurious behaviour: an interdisciplinairy approach of severe and persistent self-injurious behaviour in people with moderate to profound intellectual disabilities]
Article
Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine whether cognitive functioning (i.e., memory and executive functioning) is related to self-reported presence of pain (i.e., affirmative answer to the question whether the individual feels pain) and experience of pain (i.e., intensity and affect) in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Design, setti...
Article
Full-text available
Objective. The aim was to examine whether the presence of pain (based on physical conditions and participants’ report) and self-reported pain experience in adults with Down syndrome (DS) differ from general population controls. Design. Cross-sectional study of 224 adults with DS (mean age = 38.1 years, mild-severe intellectual disabilities) and 142...
Article
Full-text available
Objective. The presence of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ɛ4 allele might be related to higher pain experience due to increased risk for potentially painful physical conditions and cognitive impairment (less efficient coping with pain). This hypothesis is clinically relevant to examine in adults with Down syndrome (DS) because they are at risk for painful...
Article
The use of the Self-reporting Tool On Pain in people with Intellectual Disabilities (STOP-ID!), an online application developed by the authors to aid in the self-reporting of pain, was evaluated in 40 adults with Down syndrome. Comprehension of the use of the tool (the ability to recognize representations for vocabulary and pain, and to navigate th...
Article
The spinothalamic pathway mediates sensations of temperature, pain, and touch. These functions seem impaired in children with Down syndrome (DS), but have not been extensively examined in adults. The objective of the present study was to compare the spinothalamic-mediated sensory functions between adults with DS and adults from the general populati...
Article
Full-text available
Background Adults with Down syndrome (DS) are at risk for age-related painful physical conditions, but also for under-reporting pain. Pictograms may facilitate self-report of pain, because they seem suitable for the global visual processing in DS and for iconic representation of abstract concepts.Method Participants (N = 39, M age = 41.2) assigned...
Article
People with intellectual disabilities are at high risk for pain and have communication difficulties. Facial and numeric scales for self-report may aid pain identification. It was examined whether the comprehension of a facial affective scale and a numeric scale for pain in adults with Down syndrome (DS) varies with presentation format. Adults with...
Article
Full-text available
People with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have a higher risk of painful medical conditions. Partly because of the impaired ability to communicate about it, pain is often undertreated. To strengthen pain assessment in this population, we conducted a systematic review to identify behavioral pain indicators in people with IDs by using Embase, PubMed...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Aim: 1) To examine whether pain characteristics (experience, behaviour, medical conditions, and coping of pain) differ between adults with these syndromes and control groups matched on either chronological or mental age, 2) To examine whether cognitieve functioning is related to pain experience adults with these syndromes, 3) To examine whether these adults are able to use visual analogue scales to communicate about pain experience, 4) To examine whether observed self-reported pain is related to pain behaviour or the presence of physical conditions that may cause pain.