Nancy J. Turner

Nancy J. Turner
University of Victoria | UVIC · School of Environmental Studies

About

194
Publications
178,588
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10,997
Citations
Citations since 2017
42 Research Items
5934 Citations
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Publications

Publications (194)
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples in Northwestern North America have always worked with predictable cycles of day and night, tides, moon phases, seasons, and species growth and reproduction, including such phenological indicators as the blooming of flowers and the songs of birds. Negotiating variability has been constant in people's lives. Long‐term monitoring an...
Article
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Societal impact statement Plant biodiversity is fundamental to the future of food security and agriculture. Berries are the most economically important fruit crops in Canada. Within this article, we explore the nutritional, cultural, and botanical importance of berries, including crop wild relatives (plant species that are closely related to domest...
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples' lives, cultures, and values are defined largely by their long-term relationships with the lands, waters, and lifeforms of their territories. Their stories, names, ceremonies, and connections with the plants and animals on which they have depended over countless generations are cornerstones of their knowledge systems, systems of...
Article
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Abstract The biological knowledge and associated values and beliefs of Indigenous and other long‐resident Peoples are often overlooked and underrepresented in governance, planning and decision‐making at local, regional, national and international levels. Ethnobiology—the study of the dynamic relationships among peoples, biota and environments—is a...
Article
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This paper describes the importance of fungi to Canadian Indigenous Peoples. Based on collaborative research with Indigenous knowledge holders and a review of literature, approximately 30-40 fungi are documented as having cultural roles for Canadian Indigenous groups. Some peoples have not eaten mushrooms traditionally, whereas others have a histor...
Article
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In recent years, there has been an increasing recognition of the role humans play in the structure, composition, and function of ecosystems. Ethnoecological documentation of traditional management systems of Indigenous Peoples in northwestern North America has contributed significantly to this rethinking. A less well-recognized but foundational par...
Article
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The knowledge systems and practices of Indigenous Peoples and local communities play critical roles in safeguarding the biological and cultural diversity of our planet. Globalization, government policies, capitalism, colonialism, and other rapid social-ecological changes threaten the relationships between Indigenous Peoples and local communities an...
Article
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Grizzly bears and polar bears often serve as ecological “flagship species” in conservation efforts, but although consumptively used in some areas and cultures they can also be important cultural keystone species even where not hunted. We extend the application of established criteria for defining cultural keystone species to also encompass species...
Article
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The global “nutrition transition” has had an immense impact on Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America. From an original diet comprised of mostly local plant and animal foods, including salmon, game, diverse plants, seaweed and other marine foods, many Indigenous people are now eating mostly imported, refined marketed foods that are genera...
Article
At least 50 different plant foods in Indigenous Peoples' traditional diets in northwestern North America—including berries, root vegetables, greens, and tree sap and inner bark—are known for their sweet taste. Some were, and are, appreciated as confections themselves and others were used to sweeten foods and medicinal preparations. These sweet food...
Article
Indigenous peoples have occupied the northwestern North American coast for at least 15 000 years—a time when much of the land was covered by a kilometre or more of ice and only patches of land were glacier free. Over the millennia, through difficult times and seasons of plenty, they have built up an immense body of local knowledge, practice, and be...
Article
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The article Kwakwaka’wakw “Clam Gardens”, written by Douglas Deur, Adam Dick, Kim Recalma-Clutesi, Nancy J. Turner, was originally published Online First without Open Access.
Book
This book draws on world-wide experiences and valuable lessons to highlight community-ecosystem interactions and the role of traditional knowledge in sustaining biocultural resources through community-based adaptations. The book targets different audiences including researchers working on human-environment interactions and climate adaptation practi...
Article
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Continuity of coastal Indigenous cultures relies on healthy ecosystems and opportunity to fulfill cultural practices. Owing to resource stewardship practice over millennia, Indigenous nations possess Indigenous knowledge that positions them as leaders in contemporary resource management. However, Indigenous peoples possibly face social-ecological t...
Article
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The prevalence of widespread, human-caused ecological degradation suggests that fundamental change is needed in how societies interact with the environment. In this paper we argue that durable models of environmental relationships already exist in approaches of place-based peoples, whose values connect people to their environments, provide guidance...
Article
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People's values and attitudes regarding the natural world determine the level of care with which they approach the use of natural resources. We studied how human relationships with nature influence people's actions, using western redcedar (Thuja plicata), a major forest tree of northwestern North America, as a study system. Semi-structured intervie...
Article
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Hazelnuts (Corylus spp.; Betulaceae) constitute an important food, technology, textile, and medicine resource for Indigenous peoples across Canada. As with other types of traditional ecological knowledge and wisdom, the legacy of residential schools, ongoing colonialism, and continued land degradation and development have affected how people rememb...
Preprint
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Because of the complexity and speed of environmental, climatic, and socio-political change in coastal marine social-ecological systems, there is significant academic and applied interest in assessing and fostering the adaptive capacity of coastal communities. Adaptive capacity refers to the latent ability of a system to respond proactively and posi...
Article
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Biodiversity loss undermines the long-term maintenance of ecosystem functions and the well-being of human populations. Global-scale policy initiatives, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, have failed to curb the loss of biodiversity. This failure has led to contentious debates over alternative solutions that represent opposing visions...
Chapter
Increasingly, ethnoecologists, anthropologists, and conservation biologists are recognizing that Indigenous People of the Northwest Coast and neighboring regions have been astute stewards and managers—not just harvesters and consumers—of the resources and ecosystems on which they have relied. Over thousands of years, these people have developed div...
Article
Food forests—edible, perennial, polyculture systems—are of increasing interest in North America and the United Kingdom, as reflected in projects ranging from urban food initiatives to integrated conservation and restoration planning. To examine emerging food forestry (FF) against the backdrop of ecological restoration (ER), we conducted semi-struct...
Article
For many Indigenous peoples, their traditional lands are archives of their histories, from the deepest of time to recent memories and actions. These histories are written in the landscapes’ geological features, contemporary plant and animal communities, and associated archaeological and paleoecological records. Some of these landscapes, recently te...
Chapter
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In this chapter, we examine the diversity of strategies developed over mil- lennia by Northwest Coast First Peoples to maintain and enhance marine and coastal species and habitats. These form a continuum with traditional terres- trial management systems, and tend to reflect the same overarching values and protocols applied and upheld by Indigenous...
Article
Full-text available
Because of the complexity and speed of environmental, climatic, and socio-political change in coastal marine social-ecological systems, there is significant academic and applied interest in assessing and fostering the adaptive capacity of coastal communities. Adaptive capacity refers to the latent ability of a system to respond proactively and posi...
Article
Both birds and plants are major components of the world's biocultural diversity. Salient species of both are recognized and named in virtually every language and both feature in countless ways in people's systems of knowledge, practice, and belief, as sources of food, materials, and medicines, and as ceremonial and religious symbols. However, these...
Article
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A cornerstone of environmental policy is the debate over protecting nature for humans’ sake (instrumental values) or for nature’s (intrinsic values) (1). We propose that focusing only on instrumental or intrinsic values may fail to resonate with views on personal and collective well-being, or “what is right,” with regard to nature and the environme...
Data
The debate over protecting nature for humans' sake (instrumental values) or for nature's (intrinsic values) is a cornerstone of environmental policy. We propose that focusing only on instrumental or intrinsic values may fail to resonate with views on personal and collective well-being or " what is right " , with regard to nature and the environment...
Article
Full-text available
"Sense of place" as an anthropological, geographical, and philosophical construct has been a focus of research in recent decades, particularly following the publication of Keith Basso's Wisdom Sits in Places. Simultaneously, the emergence of the concept of social-ecological systems and their value in the application of conservation and restoration...
Article
Indigenous Peoples of the Northwest Coast Cultural Area of North America managed plant populations of many of the 100–200 species used for food and other purposes, through cultivation and selective harvesting. Eelgrass (Zostera marina, L.; Zosteraceae) was one of these species. The Kwakwaka’wakw harvested its sweet rhizomes in the springtime. Direc...
Article
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The indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast of North America actively managed natural resources in diverse ways to enhance their productivity and proximity. Among those practices that have escaped the attention of anthropologists until recently is the traditional management of intertidal clam beds, which Northwest Coast peoples have enhanced thro...
Article
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Local values and knowledge can be important components in creating robust climate change adaptation strategies for marginalized communities. Incorporating local values into the climate change planning process in a structured way and effectively using local knowledge not only improves the identification of priority actions for climate change adaptat...
Conference Paper
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Background/Question/Methods: In northwestern North America, Indigenous peoples speak over 50 languages grouped within several language families. Each language has its characteristic body of vocabulary, including numerous plant names and botanical terms. How does this botanical vocabulary reflect people’s Traditional Ecological Knowledge systems an...
Article
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Place-specific knowledge systems, combined with hands-on resource use and a long-term commitment to sustaining resources and ecosystems, are vitally important in restoring the planet to health. This approach is already an integral part of the resource use and management systems of many Indigenous and tribal peoples worldwide, whose knowledge and pr...
Article
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This article provides an overview of systems of naming and organizing categories of plants among Indigenous languages and cultures of British Columbia, using tools provided through the fields of ethnobotany, linguistics, and anthropology.
Article
Nancy Turner has studied Indigenous peoples' knowledge of plants and environments in northwestern North America for over forty years. In Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge, she integrates her research into a two-volume ethnobotanical tour-de-force. Drawing on information shared by Indigenous botanical experts and collaborators, the ethnographic...
Article
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Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) systems are as important today for the survival and well-being of many indigenous peoples as they ever were. These ways of knowing have much to contribute at a time of marked climate change. As indigenous peoples have sustained exposure to natural resources and phenomena in particular places over time, they ar...
Article
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Indigenous communities commonly face a major impediment in their ongoing efforts to participate effectively in the stewardship and sustainable management of their traditional lands, waters and resources. Externally driven projects and policies can overwhelm communities' abilities to respond, severely impact in their resource base, and significantly...
Technical Report
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The International Boreal Conservation Science Panel (IBCSP) is an interdisciplinary team of scientists from the United States and Canada. Its members have a wide range of expertise and experience gained from years of research, conservation, and writing about science issues related to North America and many other parts of the world. The panel is joi...
Article
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Ecosystem services research has been focused on the ways that humans directly benefit from goods and services, and economic valuation techniques have been used to measure those benefits. We argue that, although it is appropriate in some cases, this focus on direct use and economic quantification is often limiting and can detract from environmental...
Article
This article presents practical guidelines for healthy and ethical collaborative research with traditional knowledge holders (TKHs) and local/ traditional communities. Experience indicates that, in a majority of cases, research on indigenous knowledge or traditional knowledge systems (TKSs) in India and elsewhere also is pursued with very least fol...
Article
Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) is a tree species utilized for succulent edible cambium and secondary phloem in the spring by Interior First Peoples of the Pacific Northwest. In this article we present a nutritional analysis of this food based on a pooled sample of 17 trees harvested in the Chilcotin region of British Columbia. We al...
Article
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A case study is presented on the contested land ownership of the estuarine gardens in Kingcome Village, British Columbia (BC) between white settlers and the native Kwakwaka'wakw Indian Nation during the 19th century. The role that the natural resources of Kingcome Village's estuarine gardens played in white colonists' settlement of the Kingcome Vil...
Article
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Indigenous Peoples of North America have collectively used approximately 1800 different native species of plants, algae, lichens and fungi as food. When European explorers, traders and settlers arrived on the continent, these native foods, often identified and offered by Indigenous hosts, gave them sustenance and in some cases saved them from starv...
Article
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Purpose The purpose of this research is to examine Gitga'at First Nation approaches and objectives concerning the use of local biological and cultural resources through the lens of a locally‐driven proposal to establish an eco‐cultural tourism enterprise. Design/methodology/approach This project was developed in collaboration with the Gitga'at Fir...
Conference Paper
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Background/Question/Methods Most people have little trouble understanding and accommodating the notion that there is more to a human being than our bones, blood, flesh and hair; human life is valued far beyond the direct worth of our bodies. Yet, many have difficulty recognizing this type of value of other species, and nature in general: a deeply...
Conference Paper
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Background/Question/Methods Oplopanax horridus (Sm.) Miq. (devil’s club) is an important plant to First Nations of British Columbia, Canada. More than 34 broad categories of medicinal use and eight categories of spiritual use of devil’s club have been listed by researchers for 38 linguistic groups from across western North America. In northwestern...
Article
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Organic farmers raise poultry and rabbits in British Columbia using ethnoveterinary remedies and natural feedstuffs. These ethnoveterinary practices were documented from interviews and a participatory workshop. This paper includes the plants used for respiratory conditions, nutrition and dental care of rabbits. Some of the plants have been used in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The International Boreal Conservation Science Panel is an interdisciplinary team of scientists from the U.S. and Canada. Its members have a wide range of expertise and experience gained from years of research, conservation, and writing about science issues related to North America and many other parts of the world. The panel is jointly concerned wi...
Article
Full-text available
This study reports how Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and informal cultural institutions have conserved key varieties of the wildgrowing rice, 'tinni' (red rice, or brownbeard rice, Oriza rufipogon Griff.), within the Bhar community of eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. The study was conducted, using conventional and participatory methods, in 10...
Article
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Bakeapple, or cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus L.; Rosaceae) is a circumpolar perennial with orange aggregate fruits, which has been a vital food resource for many northern peoples including those of the Subarctic and Arctic areas of North America. This study documented the importance and local knowledge of bakeapple in the predominantly Métis communi...
Article
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Plants used for treating endo- and ectoparasites of rabbits and poultry in British Columbia included Arctium lappa (burdock), Artemisia sp. (wormwood), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum...
Chapter
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IntroductionThe Development of EthnobotanyMethods in EthnobotanyClassic Case Studies and their Contributions to Ethnobotanical PraxisConclusion References
Book
The single comprehensive treatment of the field, from the leading members of the Society of Ethnobiology. The field of ethnobiology-the study of relationships between particular ethnic groups and their native plants and animals-has grown very rapidly in recent years, spawning numerous subfields. Ethnobiological research has produced a wide range of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The International Boreal Conservation Science Panel is an interdisciplinary team of scientists from the U.S. and Canada. Its members have a wide range of expertise and experience gained from years of research, conservation, and writing about science issues related to North America and many other parts of the world. The panel is jointly concerned wi...
Article
Full-text available
The Pacific Coastal Mountains of western North America have immense ethnobotanical significance. Since time immemorial, Indigenous Peoples have journeyed from permanent settlements in lowland regions to upland sites in order to harvest and process a range of plant resources –foods, materials and medicines– as well as to hunt and fish, and undertake...
Article
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Porphyra abbottae Krishnamurthy is a nutritionally and culturally important species of red alga used by First Peoples of coastal British Columbia and neighb