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Nancy Hildebrandt

Nancy Hildebrandt
Retired

PhD Linguistcs McGill University

About

34
Publications
2,819
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1,126
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
113 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
June 2008 - June 2015
Oracle Corporation
Position
  • Information Architect
January 1988 - December 1994
Massachusetts General Hospital
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
The results of two studies of sentence comprehension in aphasic patients using sentence-picture matching tests are presented. In the first study, 52 aphasic patients were tested on 10 sentence types. Analysis of the number of correct responses per sentence type showed effects of syntactic complexity and number of propositions. Factor analysis yield...
Article
Full-text available
Sixty patients, 46 with left-hemisphere strokes and 14 with right-hemisphere strokes, and 21 normal control subjects were tested for the ability to use syntactic structures to determine the meaning of sentences. Patients enacted thematic roles (the agent, recipient and goal of an action) in 12 examples of each of 25 sentence types, which were desig...
Article
Patients with acquired deep dyslexia are unable to read nonwords aloud. The deficit has therefore been attributed to damage in nonlexical phonological processing. Buchanan, Hildebrandt and MacKinnon [5 Journal of Neurolingistics8, 163–182, 1994] demonstrated that a deep dyslexic patient could process nonword phonology in two implicit tests. The gen...
Article
Full-text available
In the Reicher-Wheeler paradigm, fluent readers can identify letters better when they appear in a word than when they appear in either a pronounceable pseudoword (a lexicality effect) or a single letter (a word-letter effect). It was predicted that if both of these effects involve a lexical factor, then adult acquired dyslexic subjects whose defici...
Article
We report five experiments that deal with the role of verb selectional restrictions and the animacy of nouns in the construction and interpretation of syntactic structure. In the first two experiments, the effect of the selectional restriction requirements of verbs and the animacy of nouns on sentence comprehension was assessed in a speeded accepta...
Article
Recent work has shown that implicit phonological knowledge plays a role in the word recognition performance of deep dyslexics [Hildebrandt, N. and Sokol, S.M. Reading and Writing, 5, 43–68, 1993; Katz, R.B. and Lanzoni, S.M. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology45, 575–608, 1992]. The results of the current study extend this examination to i...
Article
Current accounts of the functional impairment underlying phonological dyslexia (PD) do not postulate any disturbance of accessing the orthographic lexicon. For deep dyslexia (DD), only the righthemisphere hypothesis involves such a disturbance. However,neither PD nor DD subjects showed the normal word-superiority effects in a Reicher-Wheeler experi...
Article
We report a case study of an acquired dyslexic subject, who on tasks standardly used to assess acquired dyslexia showed no evidence of having any access to sublexical phonological information. However, on a lexical decision task, he showed normal effects of spelling regularity for low-frequency words. Since this effect is typically attributed to th...
Article
We present a case of a patient with a disorder of short-term memory. BO has a reduced span (2 to 3 items), no recency effect in free recall, and rapid forgetting in Brown-Peterson tasks, establishing her as a patient with impaired short-term verbal memory functions. She shows no effect of either phonological similarity or word length in recall of a...
Article
Linguistic analyses of aphasic patients’ performances have developed to the point where interesting, non-trivial descriptions and explanations of pathological performances are available in linguistic and processing terms. The purpose of this paper is to present a short synopsis for linguists of several recent analyses of aphasic patients’ disturban...
Article
These case studies illustrate the specificity of deficits affecting the comprehension of certain syntactic structures, and the possibility of analysing these deficits in relationship to particular theories of syntactic representations and parsing. These cases also demonstrate the need to consider the adaptations patients make to their deficits in a...
Article
We present the case of an aphasic patient who shows a selective impairment in interpreting syntactic structures on a test of sentence comprehension involving object manipulation. KG makes errors in assigning the antecedents of phonologically empty NPs called traces (Chomsky, 1982 a,b) in sentences like John seems to Bill to be shaving. He is signif...
Article
Lexical access in alphabetic English is often achieved without phonological mediation. In contrast, lexical access of words written in Katakana, the Japanese syllabic script, is widely held to require preliminary phonological recoding. In reading English, words are named faster than nonwords. Words have lexical representations that are addressed vi...
Article
series of studies were designed to examine the role of working memory and its subcomponents in written sentence comprehension (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Chapter
This chapter reviews the experimental literature on kanji/kana processing using normal subjects. In general, the experimental studies are focused on the following broad areas: (1) organization of the mental lexicon, (2) word recognition processes, (3) psycholinguistic properties of ideographic script, and (4) neurolinguistic organization and locali...
Chapter
The literature reviews on Japanese alexia and agraphia published since 1901 disclose a number of dissociations in performance between various aspects of the writing system. Six types of dissociation have been reported over the past 80 years: (1) better performance in kanji than in kana processing, (2) better performance in kana than in kanji proces...
Chapter
Traditionally, the only dimension considered a relevant variable in the psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic investigations of reading and writing Japanese is phonemically-based versus visually-based dimension, attributed to kana and kanji, respectively. Differences in performance for kana and kanji are interpreted in terms of differential visual o...
Chapter
This chapter describes various types of dissociations between the reading and/or writing and comprehension of kana and kanji observed among brain-damaged patients. Since the time the dissociation between kana and kanji in reading and/or writing was first noticed, several interpretations have been set forth to account for the phenomenon. For example...
Chapter
A superficial reading of the literature on dissociations between performance with kanji and kana characters in Japanese alexic patients may lead the non-Japanese reader to assume that there are two writing systems in Japanese, one syllabic and the other ideographic, and that some patients selectively lose access to one or the other. This chapter de...
Article
Written for the Dept. of Linguistics. Typescript. Thesis (Ph.D.) -- McGill University. Bibliography: leaves 261-263.

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