Namkje Koudenburg

Namkje Koudenburg
University of Groningen | RUG · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

34
Publications
8,130
Reads
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384
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2013 - present
University of Groningen
Position
  • Postdoctoral researcher / Lecturer

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Social interaction is pivotal to the formation of social relationships and groups. Much is known about the importance of interaction content (e.g., the transfer of information). The present review concentrates on the influence of the act of conversing on the emergence of a sense of solidarity, more or less independently of the content. Micro-charac...
Article
Full-text available
Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here). The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on...
Article
Full-text available
We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, a...
Article
We all know the awkward feeling when a conversation is disrupted by a brief silence. This paper studies why such moments can be unsettling. We suggest that silences are particularly disturbing if they disrupt the conversational flow. In two experiments we examined the effects of a single brief instance of silence on social needs, perceived consensu...
Article
Full-text available
In two field studies, we examined whether voters overestimate support for their political party among nonvoters. In Study 1, voters estimated the percentage of votes their party would receive in an upcoming election, and this percentage increased when voters estimated the percentage of votes their party would receive if nonvoters also were to vote....
Article
Background: Theoretically, reductions of self-esteem among people who stutter (PWS) are often explained by individual negative cognitions or emotions of the PWS or their conversation partners. We propose that the flow of a conversation can be seen as a representation of the relationship between speakers, and that by disrupting this flow, a stutter...
Preprint
Full-text available
Observing deviant behaviour can lead to ‘norm erosion’, where a norm is no longer seen as relevant and compliance with it is reduced. Previous research argues that social confrontations can mitigate norm erosion. However, this work has not considered the impact of bystanders, who might influence the outcome of confrontations by offering support - o...
Article
Full-text available
In times of societal change, like changes in gender roles, one may compliment men deciding to spend more time on childcare, or women pursuing a job higher up, to support their pioneering behaviour. However, we predict that while compliments may communicate appreciation of someone's behaviour, they simultaneously communicate that a norm has been bre...
Preprint
Full-text available
Feeling heard is seen as a cornerstone of intimate relationships and healthy self-development. In public life, feeling heard may play an important role in a well-functioning representative democracy. The current paper aimed to define and measure feeling heard in the context of everyday interpersonal interactions. Based on an integrative literature...
Article
Full-text available
Polarization about societal issues involves attitudinal conflict, but we know little about how such conflict transforms into moral conflict. Integrating insights on polarization and psychological value protection, we propose a model that predicts when and how attitude moralization (i.e., when attitudes become grounded in core values) may be trigger...
Article
Full-text available
Opinion polarization is increasingly becoming an issue in today’s society, producing both unrest at the societal level, and conflict within small scale communications between people of opposite opinion. Often, opinion polarization is conceptualized as the direct opposite of agreement and consequently operationalized as an index of dispersion. Howev...
Article
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In Western societies, many polarized debates extend beyond the area of opinions, having consequences for social structures within society. Such segmentation of society into opinion-based groups may hinder communication, making it difficult to reconcile viewpoints across group boundaries. In three representative samples from Australia and the Nether...
Article
Full-text available
In online text-based discussions, people behave less diplomatically because they are more outspoken and less responsive. This can feed impressions of polarization. This article uses a new methodology to isolate the influence of outspokenness and responsiveness in shaping perceptions of polarization in online chat and face-to-face discussions. Text-...
Preprint
Joint action can take many forms: whereas rowers synchronise their movements, dancers often engage in closely coordinated complementary action. Even in martial arts, fighters closely coordinate their movements in an effort to understand and control their opponent’s movements. In joint actions such as these, the possibilities for action require mult...
Article
Full-text available
In group discussions, people rely on everyday diplomatic skills to socially regulate the interaction, maintain harmony, and avoid escalation. This article compares social regulation in online and face-to-face (FtF) groups. It studies the micro-dynamics of online social interactions in response to disagreements. Thirty-two triads discussed, in a rep...
Article
Full-text available
In many Western societies there are rising concerns about increasing polarization in public debate. However, statistics on private attitudes paint a different picture: the average attitudes in societies are more moderate and remain rather stable over time. The present paper presents an agent-based model of how such discrepancies between public opin...
Article
Full-text available
Even when overt sexism and prejudice become rarer, social norms that perpetuate inequality are remarkably persistent. The present research lays out one of the subtle ways in which sexist norms may spread through society, by pointing to the role of responses to sexism. We investigate how third parties infer social norms about sexism when observing s...
Article
Full-text available
This study explores how people navigate the field of tension between expressing disagreement and maintaining social relationships in text-based online as compared to face-to-face discussions. In face-to-face discussions, differences of opinion are socially regulated by introducing ambiguity in message content coupled with instant responding on a re...
Presentation
Full-text available
People are remarkably able to move together. In this symposium speakers will present their research from sports to music and beyond.
Article
When someone expresses a morally deviant opinion, this person is likely to face derogation by their group. We examined whether people reacted more positively to opinion deviance when social identity was induced from individual expressions, rather than deduced from ingroup similarities. Participants (n = 155 divided over 41 groups) engaged in small-...
Article
Full-text available
Group growth is of fundamental importance to understanding social influence. How do passive bystanders become psychologically involved when observing a small group of actors? Our hypothesis was that the kind of solidarity displayed by the group shapes the bonds that emerge with an audience. We studied audience responses to modern dance performances...
Article
Full-text available
In this research, we investigate how a negative (or hostile) norm regarding minorities at the societal level can fuel polarization between majority subgroups at the local level. We hypothesize that rapid social change in the form of polarization results from the interplay between small group processes and perceptions of society at large. By employi...
Article
Based on the interactive model of identity formation (Postmes, Haslam, & Swaab, 2005) we investigate whether displays of coordinated actions foster feelings of solidarity. Participants were randomly assigned to roles of actors and observers in two experiments (N = 191 and 276). Actors performed in an “airband” in which all played air-guitar (enacti...
Article
One of the central goals within communication is to establish whether people are on the same wavelength. Although such assessment can occur objectively, by exchanging and comparing viewpoints, people may also derive a sense of shared reality subjectively, through micro-dynamics in the form of conversation that inform them whether their views are sh...
Article
Full-text available
Marginalised individuals are often caught in a vicious cycle of economic or health problems, a lack of social connection, and disempowerment. The present research examines interventions that provide opportunities for social inclusion to break this cycle. Specifically, in two longitudinal field studies we examined the effect of social inclusion on s...
Article
Social connections are essential to health and well-being. However, when pursing social acceptance, people may sometimes engage in behavior that is detrimental to their health. Using a multi-time-point design, we examined whether the structure of an emerging network of students in an academic summer school program correlated with their physical hea...
Article
Full-text available
Conversations are susceptible to many disturbances: A speaker's hesitations, distractions, or, when communicating online, technical hiccups that may cause brief delays. Research among previously unacquainted individuals revealed that brief disruptions in conversational flow can have profound social consequences: Silences or delays in mediated commu...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we suggest a mechanism for norm regulation that does not rely on explicit information exchange or costly reinforcement, but rather on the sensitivity of group members to social cues in their environment. We examine whether brief conversational silences can (a) signal a threat to one’s inclusionary status in the group and (b) motivat...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the process by which perceptions of conversational flow foster an emergent sense of group entitativity. We propose that conversational flow influences more than just the quality of interpersonal relations: it signals entitativity - social unity at the group level. We predicted that when conversations are intermitted by brief sil...
Article
Full-text available
Positive illusions about a partner’s physical attractiveness occur when individuals’ ratings of their partner’s attractiveness are more positive than more objective ratings. Ratings that may serve as a’’reality benchmark’ include ratings by the partner him/herself and observer ratings. The present study compared the effects of using different reali...
Article
Full-text available
In two experiments we examined the influence of meta-stereotypes (beliefs regarding stereotypes that the outgroup has about one's ingroup) in different contexts. In Study 1, we demonstrated that women have the same meta-stereotype about men in dating and work contexts, but experience the meta-stereotype as more positive when dating men, rather than...
Article
Full-text available
In two experiments we examined the influence of meta-stereotypes (beliefs regarding stereotypes that the outgroup has about one's ingroup) in different contexts. In Study 1, we demonstrated that women have the same meta-stereotype about men in dating and work contexts, but experience the meta-stereotype as more positive when dating men, rather than...

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Projects (2)
Project
Joint action can take many forms: whereas rowers synchronize their movements, dancers often engage in closely coordinated complementary action. Even in martial arts, fighters closely coordinate their movements in an effort to understand and control their opponent’s movements. While the form of coordination differs, the behaviour of each social system emerges from the interaction between the individual agents. In this project we examine the psychological experiences of individual agency and collective unity in situations in which the individual actions cannot be understood separately from the behaviour of the system as a whole. We focus on three different forms of joint action: synchronous action, which is inherently cooperative, complementary action that involves cooperative goals, and coordinated action that has inherently competitive goals (combative action).
Project
How are social identities formed? How do shared norms emerge and change over time? How do groups become an aspect of our self-concept? How does a sense of "us" emerge and envelop all group members? In our research we have studied this process in numerous settings from group discussions to activities such as singing or moving together. The basic idea is this: there are two pathways to forming groups (cf. the interactive model of identity formation, Postmes, Haslam, & Swaab, 2005). Groups can deduce a shared identity from the similarities between individuals, such as pursuing the same goals or values, looking similar or performing the same actions. Groups can also form organically on the basis of individual interactions, especially when group members complement one another's actions: the induction of shared identity. In our recent research we collaborate with choreographers of Random Collision to study the impact of joint movement, http://www.randomcollision.net/ and https://www.facebook.com/randomcollision/