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Nailya Ordabayeva

Nailya Ordabayeva
Dartmouth College, USA

Ph.D. in Management, INSEAD

About

46
Publications
27,348
Reads
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1,283
Citations
Citations since 2017
27 Research Items
1050 Citations
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Introduction
Website: https://www.nailyao.com. Nailya Ordabayeva researches how social and sensory factors influence consumers' purchase decisions and how they impact wellbeing. Her expertise focuses on the effects of social hierarchy, status, and sensory perception on consumer decisions. 
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - June 2022
Boston College
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
July 2014 - June 2019
Boston College
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
July 2010 - July 2014
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
With rising public concerns about waste and overconsumption, predicting and effectively managing consumers’ package size impressions have become critical for both marketers and public health advocates. The AddChange heuristic model of size impression assumes that people add (instead of multiplying) the percentage changes in the height, width, and l...
Article
It is widely believed that increasing the equality of material possessions or income in a social group should lead people at the bottom of the distribution to consume less and save more. However, this prediction and its causal mechanism have never been studied experimentally. Five studies show that greater equality increases the satisfaction of tho...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding consumer response to product supersizing and downsizing is important for policy makers, consumer researchers, and marketers. In three laboratory experiments and two field studies, the authors find that changes in size appear smaller when packages and portions change in all three spatial dimensions-height, width, and length-than when t...
Chapter
In the last two years, consumers have experienced massive changes in consumption – whether due to shifts in habits; the changing information landscape; challenges to their identity, or new economic experiences of scarcity or abundance. What can we expect from these experiences? How are the world's leading thinkers applying both foundational knowled...
Article
With the proliferation of peer‐to‐peer (P2P) exchanges in the marketplace, understanding which consumer factors drive demand for P2P providers is important. We examine the role of consumers’ economic system justification beliefs (about the fairness of existing economic arrangements and outcomes), which, despite their growing salience in the marketp...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has found that for men, activating a mating motive increases luxury consumption as a way to attract a romantic partner. However, little is known about the role of luxury consumption in women’s romantic endeavors. The present research conceptualizes a mate screening motive which explains how women use luxury consumption to romantic...
Article
While existing consumer research on political ideology often focuses on ideological differences in preferences for high-status, typically observably superior products, little is known about how political ideology may shape preferences for observably inferior products in non-status-signaling domains. Observably inferior products are product options...
Article
Subjective perceptions of inequality can substantially influence policy attitudes, public health metrics, and societal well‐being, but the lack of consensus in the scientific community on how to best operationalize and measure these perceptions may impede progress on the topic. Here, we provide a theoretical framework for the study of subjective pe...
Article
Conventional wisdom in marketing emphasizes the detrimental effects of negative online reviews for brands. An important question is whether some firms could more effectively manage negative reviews to improve brand preference and outcomes. To address this question, our research examines how customers respond to online reviews of identity-relevant b...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the effect of political identity on customers’ satisfaction with the products and services they consume. Recent work suggests that conservatives are less likely to complain than liberals. Building on that work, the present research examines how political identity shapes customer satisfaction which has broad implications for cu...
Article
Consumer research is uniquely positioned and equipped to develop a deeper understanding of the role of economic inequality in consumers’ lives. Building from the ideas and questions raised by Goya‐Tocchetto and Payne (2022), we propose a three‐step framework that delineates the role of the marketplace in shaping consumers’ perception of and respons...
Article
This paper builds an organizing framework for understanding how social perceptions influence consumption at three levels: consumption for self, consumption for others, and consumption within the broader system. At each level, social others play a distinct role in individuals’ consumption behaviors, from passive observers to active agents. Important...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research has established that status threat leads consumers to display status-related products such as luxury brands. While compensatory consumption within the domain of the status threat (e.g., products associated with financial and professional success) is the most straightforward way to cope with comparisons to high-status individuals, we...
Preprint
The extent of inequality that people perceive in the world is often a stronger predictor of individual and societal outcomes than the level of inequality that actually exists. It is therefore imperative for researchers to theoretically conceptualize and empirically operationalize perceived inequality in a coherent and consistent manner. However, th...
Preprint
The extent of inequality that people perceive in the world is often a better predictor of individual and societal outcomes than the level of inequality that actually exists. As such, scholars from across the social sciences, including economics, sociology, psychology, and political science, have recently worked to understand individuals’ (mis)perce...
Article
This review synthesizes the latest advances in the psychology of luxury consumption. We discuss novel drivers, forms, and consequences of luxury consumption from recent research. We propose that the psychology of luxury consumption is governed by a set of tensions between what luxury means to the self and the external forces that define luxury cons...
Article
Individuals signal status through luxury goods because high status confers social, economic, and psychological benefits. While it is known that luxury (vs. non-luxury) consumption signals individuals' high (vs. low) level of status, it is unclear how individuals' marketplace behaviors influence perceptions of type, or source, of their status. The p...
Preprint
Full-text available
COVID-19—and the ensuing economic fallout—exposed society’s vast inequalities. Current stimulus plans and ongoing debates revolve around restoring society to its pre-COVID-19 state, a singular focus driven by a prevalent status quo bias. We propose that policymakers should adopt a more ambitious goal: to take advantage of the change momentum of COV...
Article
Full-text available
The present research proposes that luxury consumption can be a double-edged sword: while luxury consumption yields status benefits, it can also make consumers feel inauthentic, producing what we call the impostor syndrome from luxury consumption. As a result, paradoxically, luxury consumption may backfire and lead consumers to behave less confident...
Article
The inequality of wealth in the United States has reached record high levels in recent years. Although many people agree that the current level of inequality is extreme, public support for redistributive measures designed to reduce inequality is divided. Prior work predicts that perceiving high similarity can potentially boost individuals' support...
Article
In order to promote their products, food marketers use labels (e.g., crunchy) to make salient the sound created by the food when it is eaten. Will merely making the sound of the food salient (without changing its actual sound) affect consumption? The extant literature is silent on this question. Addressing this gap, we propose that the mere salienc...
Article
Full-text available
As consumers’ political opinions become more divided and more central to their identities, it is important to understand how political ideology shapes consumers’ attempts to differentiate from others in the marketplace. Seven studies demonstrate that political ideology systematically influences consumers’ preferences for differentiation. Conservati...
Article
Full-text available
Although wealth inequality in the U.S. has soared to unprecedented levels in recent decades, support for redistribution is not commonplace. This research proposes a new strategy to boost redistribution support, by prompting focus on similarity (vs. dissimilarity). Four studies conducted with U.S. participants online (sampled at approximately 150 pe...
Article
Five studies show that people, including experts such as professional chefs, estimate quantity decreases more accurately than quantity increases. We argue that this asymmetry occurs because physical quantities cannot be negative. Consequently, there is a natural lower bound (zero) when estimating decreasing quantities but no upper bound when estima...
Chapter
Full-text available
Status consumption has recently sparked the interest of many researchers in consumer behavior and marketing. This chapter delineates the relationship between social hierarchy and social status, offers a multi-disciplinary review of recent research in the area, and outlines the most promising avenues for future research. In the first part of the cha...
Article
Full-text available
Society has imposed strict rules about what constitutes a 'good' or a 'bad' food and 'right' or 'wrong' eating behaviour at least since antiquity. Today, the moral discourse of what we should and should not eat is perhaps stronger than ever, and it informs consumers, researchers and policy-makers about what we all should consume, research and regul...
Article
Full-text available
A rapid increase in the size of food portions has underlined the importance of understanding consumers’ ability to accurately perceive portion sizes. Drawing on research on motivated perception, we posit that attitude ambivalence (simultaneously desiring a food and perceiving it as unhealthy) enhances visual sensitivity to increasing portion sizes....
Article
Full-text available
Materialism represents a pervasive value in contemporary society and one that is associated with multiple negative consequences. Although a considerable amount of research has documented these consequences, little research has examined how materialism levels might be reduced. This article presents a research agenda for reducing materialism. The aut...
Article
Full-text available
It is widely believed that increasing the equality of material possessions or income in a social group should lead people at the bottom of the distribution to consume less and save more. However, this prediction and its causal mechanism have never been studied experimentally. Five studies show that greater equality increases the satisfaction of tho...
Article
Understanding consumer response to product supersizing and downsizing is an important issue for policy makers, consumer researchers and marketers. In three laboratory experiments the authors found that changes in size appear smaller when products change in all three dimensions (height, width, and length) than when they change in only one dimension....

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