Naiara López-Rojo

Naiara López-Rojo
Université Grenoble Alpes · Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine

PhD
Postdoctoral researcher at Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA), France

About

27
Publications
5,945
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278
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - December 2020
Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
Position
  • PhD Thesis

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Alder (Alnus glutinosa) and oak (Quercus robur) are dominant tree species in European Atlantic mixed forests, and their leaf litter is a key resource for stream ecosystems. While alder litter has higher nutrient content and palatability than other species and is rapidly processed in the stream by detritivores and microorganisms, oak litter is a tou...
Article
Biodiversity loss is known to affect the two fundamental and opposite processes controlling carbon and nutrient cycles globally, that is, primary production and decomposition, which are driven by green and brown food web compartments, respectively. However, biodiversity in these two food web compartments has been mostly studied independently, and p...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf litter decomposition is a key process in stream ecosystems, the rates of which can vary with changes in litter quality or its colonization by microorganisms. Decomposition in streams is increasingly used to compare ecosystem functioning globally, often requiring the distribution of litter across countries. It is important to understand whether...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics (MPs), a new class of pollutants that pose a threat to aquatic biodiversity, are of increasing global concern. In tandem, the amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) causing the disease chytridiomycosis is emerging worldwide as a major stressor to amphibians. We here assess whether synergies exist between this inf...
Article
Full-text available
Leaf litter of alder (Alnus glutinosa) is a key resource to detrital stream food webs. Due to its high quality and palatability, it is readily colonised by microorganisms and consumed by detritivores, contributing significantly to carbon and nutrient cycling and to ecosystem functioning. Given that this species has declined due to the spread of the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Understanding ecological patterns and processes at the global scale is becoming increasingly important in view of the rapid pace of environmental change and consequent impacts on ecosystems. This chapter reviews current knowledge about how plant litter decomposition—a key stream ecosystem process—and its major biotic and abiotic drivers vary global...
Chapter
A key or keystone species is defined as a species with disproportionately large effects on the ecosystem relative to its abundance. In freshwater ecology it is often used with a bottom-up perspective, to refer to riparian plant species whose litter resources are of particular importance for invertebrate communities and ecosystem processes. This inc...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic impacts on freshwater ecosystems cause critical losses of biodiversity that can in turn impair key processes such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. Forest streams are mainly subsidized by terrestrial organic detritus, so their functioning and conservation status can be altered by changes in forest biodiversity and composition, pa...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between detritivore diversity and decomposition can provide information on how biogeochemical cycles are affected by ongoing rates of extinction, but such evidence has come mostly from local studies and microcosm experiments. We conducted a globally distributed experiment (38 streams across 23 countries in 6 continents) using stand...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding which factors affect the process of leaf litter decomposition is crucial if we are to predict changes in the functioning of stream ecosystems as a result of human activities. One major activity with known consequences on streams is agriculture, which is of particular concern in tropical regions, where forests are being rapidly replace...
Article
Full-text available
Running waters contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes through decomposition of terrestrial plant litter by aquatic microorganisms and detritivores. Diversity of this litter may influence instream decomposition globally in ways that are not yet understood. We investigated latitudinal differences in decomposition of litter mixtures of low a...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme temperature events have increased in intensity, duration and frequency in the last century, with potential consequences on organisms and ecosystems. In many streams, leaf litter of terrestrial origin is a key resource for microorganisms and some detritivores, and its decomposition has a main role on ecosystem functioning and is often used a...
Article
Full-text available
Plant biodiversity loss in riparian forests is known to alter key stream ecosystem processes such as leaf litter decomposition. One potential mechanism mediating this biodiversity–decomposition relationship is the increased variability of plant functional traits at higher levels of biodiversity, providing more varied resources for decomposers and t...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Plant litter decomposition is a key ecosystem process that can be altered by global changes such as biodiversity loss. These effects can be particularly important in detritus-based ecosystems, such as headwater streams, which are mainly fuelled by allochthonous plant litter inputs. However, experiments examining effects of plant diversity...
Article
Full-text available
The expansion of agriculture is particularly worrying in tropical regions of the world, where native forests are being replaced by crops at alarming rates, with severe consequences for biodiversity and ecosystems. However, there is little information about the potential effects of agriculture on the functioning of tropical streams, which is essenti...
Article
Full-text available
Fungicides can reach streams through runoff or adhered to leaf litter, and have the potential to adversely affect processes such as litter decomposition and associated communities. This study investigated the effects of chlorothalonil, a widely used fungicide, on litter decomposition, detritivorous invertebrates (larvae of the insect Sericostoma py...
Article
Microplastics (MPs) are contaminants of increasing concern due to their abundance, ubiquity and persistence over time. However, knowledge about MP distribution in fresh waters and their effects on freshwater organisms is still scarce, and there is virtually no information about their potential influence on ecosystem functioning. We used a microcosm...
Article
Extreme temperatures have increased in intensity, duration and frequency in the last century, with potential consequences on key ecological processes such as organic matter breakdown. Many stream ecosystems are fueled by the breakdown of terrestrial leaf litter, which is exposed to atmospheric conditions for certain periods of time before entering...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity loss is occurring globally at unprecedented rates, altering the functioning of the Earth's ecosystems. Multiple processes are often key components of ecosystem functioning, but it is unclear how biodiversity loss affects ecosystem multifunctionality (i.e., the ability of ecosystems to maintain multiple processes simultaneously). This i...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity loss in riparian forests has the potential to alter rates of leaf litter decomposition in stream ecosystems. However, studies have reported the full range of positive, negative and no effects of plant diversity loss on decomposition, and there is currently no explanation for such inconsistent results. Furthermore, it is uncertain wheth...
Data
Effects of plant diversity loss on litter decomposition (mg) and FPOM production (mg) for the 4-species litter mixture (ACQI) and the different 3-species mixtures (ACQ, ACI, AQI and CQI) in microcosms without detritivores, examined with linear models. A: Alnus glutinosa; C: Corylus avellana; Q: Quercus robur; I: Ilex aquifolium. (DOCX)
Data
Excel spreadsheet containing the underlying numerical data for all figures and tables. (XLSX)
Data
Mean (± SE) net diversity, complementarity and selection effects on litter decomposition, and net diversity effect on FPOM production, for the 4-species litter mixture (ACQI) and the different 3-species mixtures (ACQ, ACI, AQI and CQI) in microcosms with detritivores. A: Alnus glutinosa; C: Corylus avellana; Q: Quercus robur; I: Ilex aquifolium (DO...
Article
Climate change and anthropogenic disturbances are expected to lead to more intense and frequent droughts, with potentially severe effects on structure and function of perennial temperate streams. However, more information is required on whether streams flowing through basins already affected by exotic plantations will respond to droughts in the sam...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
DRYvER is a Horizon 2020 project, which aims to collect, analyse and model data from nine drying river networkss in Europe and South America to create a novel global meta-system approach that incorporates hydrology, socio-economics, ecology and biogeochemistry in order to craft strategies, tools, guidelines, and recommendations for adaptive management of river networks in the EU and worldwide. https://www.dryver.eu/
Project
This project has the objective of improving our knowledge about the effects of multiple stressors associated with agricultural activities on the structure and functioning of tropical streams through different approaches, including field surveys, leaf litter decomposition studies and laboratory experiments.
Project
To assess the potential effects of riparian plant invasions on the functioning of headwater stream ecosystems already affected by other stressors (i.e., increased water temperature and substitution of native forest by tree plantations).