Nahuel Policelli

Nahuel Policelli
Boston University | BU · Department of Biology

Biologist - PhD

About

15
Publications
7,852
Reads
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218
Citations
Introduction
Nahuel Policelli is currently doing a postdoc at Bhatnagar lab of Microbial Ecology. Nahuel does research in mycorrhizal ecology. Most of the projects in which he is involved study how belowground biota can facilitate plants invasion.
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - present
Boston University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Soil microbes' invasion; microbial interactions and their impact on terrestrial biogeochemistry
April 2015 - December 2019
National Scientific and Technical Research Council
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Studies on different mechanisms by which below-ground mutualists affect plant invasions
April 2013 - December 2014
Universidad de Buenos Aires
Position
  • Student
Description
  • Evaluation of the effect of prescribed fire as a restoration technique in El Palmar National Park, Entre Rìos, Argentina.
Education
April 2015 - January 2020
National University of Comahue
Field of study
  • Biology, Ecology
March 2007 - December 2014
Universidad de Buenos Aires
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Belowground biota can deeply influence plant invasion. The presence of proper soil mutualists can act as a driver that enable plants to colonize new ranges. We review the species of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) that facilitate pine establishment in both native and non‐native ranges and that are associated with their invasion into nonforest settings....
Article
Full-text available
AimsBiological invasions have historically been addressed mostly from an aboveground perspective, so little is known about the impacts of belowground invasions. We studied the impact of belowground invasions on growth of native tree species and test the possibility of novel interactions between native and non-native hosts and native and non-native...
Article
Full-text available
Temperate and boreal forests are increasingly suffering from anthropic degradation. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) are symbionts with most temperate and boreal forest trees, providing their hosts with soil nutrients and water in exchange for plant carbon. This group of fungi is involved in woody plants' survival and growth and helps plants tolerate ha...
Article
Positive interactions between non-native species can accelerate their invasion rate and exacerbate their impacts. This has been shown for non-native mammals that disperse invasive ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), in turn facilitating the invasion of non-native tree species. Mammal-mediated dispersion is assumed to be the main mechanism of EMF long dist...
Article
Full-text available
Pathogen accumulation can decrease, increase, or not change invasive species abundance, but their impacts may persist in all scenarios.
Article
1. Many invasion hypotheses propose biotic interactions as the main mechanism to explain non‐native species’ success. Despite the evidence that the strength of biotic interactions varies with abiotic context, it remains unclear whether the importance of the different mechanisms proposed to explain invasion predictably varies with abiotic context an...
Article
Full-text available
Introductions and invasions by fungi, especially pathogens and mycorrhizal fungi, are widespread and potentially highly consequential for native ecosystems, but may also offer opportunities for linking microbial traits to their ecosystem functions. In particular, treating ectomycorrhizal (EM) invasions, i.e., co-invasions by EM fungi and their EM h...
Article
Full-text available
Nonnative conifers are widespread in the southern hemisphere, where their use as plantation species has led to adverse ecosystem impacts sometimes intensified by invasion. Mechanical removal is a common strategy used to reduce or eliminate the negative impacts of nonnative conifers, and encourage native regeneration. However, a variety of factors m...
Article
Full-text available
There are many hypotheses aiming to explain invasion success, but evaluating individual hypotheses in isolation may hinder our ability to understand why some species invade and others fail. Here we evaluate the interaction between propagule pressure, seed predation and missed mutualism in the invasion success of the pine, Pinus ponderosa. We evalua...
Article
Full-text available
We restate the key point in Policelli et al. (2017): the lack of evidence on pathogen accumulation controlling invasive populations calls for active management. As Flory et al. (2017) put clearly: ‘‘no waiting for pathogens to suppress invaders.’’
Article
Full-text available
Many species in the family Pinaceae are invaders. These species are relatively easy to control because of some of their intrinsic characteristics and because they are highly visible and easy to eliminate. Many Pinaceae species have been well studied because of their use in forestry and their invasive behavior in many countries. The impacts of invas...
Chapter
Full-text available
The majority of trees need mutualistic associations to thrive and survive. This can be a fundamental limitation for their ability to colonise new areas and consequently invade them. While many non-native tree species may form associations with local mutualists that substitute those present in their native range, others, probably with a higher degre...
Article
Full-text available
AFLP methodology was applied to characterize three Coprotus species (C. lacteus, C. niveus, C. sexdecimsporus) so as to estimate the levels of polymorphism within species, to analyze the phenetic relationships among them, and to contrast the AFLP findings to those of a previous RAPD study. The high number of AFLP bands obtained with the six assayed...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I'm looking for evidence showing that fITS7-ITS4 primers do a better job at capturing more EMF diversity in soil and root samples compared to ITS1f-ITS2 for Illumina seq. Thanks!!

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Explore the diversity (taxonomy, biogeography) of ECM fungi associated to Nothofagaceae in the southern hemisphere and identify key functions for nutrient cycling and plant nutrition.
Project
The goal of this project is to assess the importance of seed predation as a biotic filter to non-native Pine invasion.
Project
Study how fungal dispersion, fungal competition, and other aspects of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis could facilitate pine invasion.