Nadine Raaphorst

Nadine Raaphorst
Leiden University | LEI · Institute of Public Administration

PhD

About

21
Publications
14,856
Reads
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344
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
343 Citations
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Education
March 2013 - October 2017
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Field of study
  • Public Administration and Sociology
September 2008 - July 2011
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Field of study
  • Sociology of Culture, Media and the Arts

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
A dominant assumption in the street-level bureaucracy literature is that bureaucrats' discretion is curtailed by automated systems. Drawing on survey and factual data (n =549) from Dutch inspectors, we test the effect of automation on enforcement style and whether this can be explained by discretion-as-perceived. Our results show that automation (1...
Chapter
Full-text available
Street-level bureaucrats’ discretionary powers play an increasingly important role in public service provision and law enforcement. In order to deal with societal challenges, legislators and policy-makers leave room for professional judgment by formulating open laws, rules and policies. In making responsive decisions, i.e. treating different cases...
Article
Full-text available
Current interest in middle managers' compliance with performance management (PM) reforms focuses on their downward roles. To explore their understudied upward roles, this analysis draws on police chiefs' voice directed to senior management regarding the Israeli PM system as documented since its first introduction in 1999, and as reported both by ch...
Chapter
Full-text available
Street-level inspectors make decisions about inspectees in circumstances that are characterized by uncertainty. With control as the hallmark of top-down views on bureaucracy, uncertainty is seen as something that must be reduced to the greatest possible extent. Managerial oversight and strict rules are means by which this is typically done. Researc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Inspectors traditionally represented the hard hand of the state. They represent a powerful central government that has the power to enforce rules and levy fines. The interaction between an inspector and an inspectee is one characterized by unequal power and large uncertainty. At the frontline of government, inspectors combine their role of enforcer...
Preprint
Full-text available
Inspectors traditionally represented the hard hand of the state. They represent a powerful central government that has the power to enforce rules and levy fines. The interaction between an inspector and an inspectee is one characterized by unequal power and large uncertainly. At the frontline of government, inspectors combine their role of enforcer...
Article
Full-text available
There are several elements as to why digitisation of public services is progressing slowly. Many explanations centre on structural aspects of public institutions and their capacity and capabilities to implement digital tools. Others highlight the uptake by citizens as key to making technical solutions in the public domain work. This paper draws att...
Conference Paper
From its very beginning, street-level bureaucracy scholarship has been engaged in inequality in decision making. Street-level research shows how bureaucrats use stereotypes related to citizen-clients’ background characteristics, such as social class and ethnicity, to make decisions. Within street-level bureaucracy literature, there is however littl...
Article
Full-text available
Existing research on bureaucratic encounters typically studies how bureaucrats’ and clients’ characteristics influence frontline decision making. How social interactions between street-level bureaucrats, and between officials and citizens could directly impact case-related decisions, largely remains an underexplored field of study, despite the fact...
Thesis
Full-text available
Public organizations have traditionally been geared to reducing uncertainty by means of standardization and hierarchical control. In recent decades, managerial reforms and digitalization have made it possible to put public officials’ work under even closer scrutiny and control. At the same time, however, frontline discretion is seen as essential in...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on status characteristics and double standards theory, this study explores how social categories may affect the standards tax officials use in evaluating citizen-clients’ trustworthiness, leading to differential evaluation. Whereas the street-level bureaucracy literature mainly focuses on the direct effect of social categories on officials’...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides scholars studying frontline judgements an analytical framework – the signaling perspective – that could be used to examine how street-level bureaucrats evaluate unobservable citizen-client properties. It proposes to not only look at the kind of signals and cues officials gather, but also at the interpretive frames used to make...
Article
Full-text available
In line with psychological and economic discrimination theories, street-level bureaucracy studies show a direct effect of citizen characteristics on officials’ judgments, or show how street-level bureaucrats employ stereotypical reasoning in making decisions. Relying on sociological double standards theory, this study hypothesizes that citizen-clie...
Article
Full-text available
Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) approach, we conducted a systematic review of 58 public administration studies of organizational socialization. Organizational socialization is the process of mutual adaptation between an organization and its new members. Our findings demonstrate a growing but geo...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the kind of uncertainties frontline tax officials working with a trust-based inspection approach experience in interacting with citizen-clients. The classical literature on bureaucracy and the street-level bureaucracy literature suggest frontline officials face two kinds of uncertainties: information and interpretation problems....
Article
Full-text available
Against the background of studies about the domestication of complementary and alternative medicine into biomedical settings, this article studies how biomedicine is integrated into holistic settings. Data from 19 in-depth interviews with Dutch holistic general practitioners who combine complementary and alternative medicine with conventional treat...

Network

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Through quantification, public services have experienced a fundamental transformation from “government by rules” to “governance by numbers”, with fundamental implications not just for our understanding of the nature of public service itself, but also for wider debates about the nature of citizenship and democracy. This project scrutinizes the relationships between quantification, administrative capacity and democracy across three policy sectors (health/hospitals, higher education/universities, criminal justice/prisons) and four countries (France, Germany, Netherlands, UK). It offers a cross-national and cross-sectoral study of how managerialist ideas and instruments of quantification have been adopted and how they mattered. More specifically, it examines (i) how quantification has travelled across sectors and states; (ii) relations between quantification and administrative capacity; and (iii) how quantification has redefined relations between public service and liberal democratic understandings of public welfare, notions of citizenship, equity, accountability and legitimacy. The research is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of social scientists based in the Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Centre de Sociologie de l’Innovation at Mines ParisTech (France), the Faculty of Sociology at Bielefeld University (Germany), the Department of Management Accounting and Control at Helmut-Schmidt University Hamburg (Germany) and the Institute of Political Science at Leiden University (Netherlands). The three year research project is supported by more than €1.9million in research grant funding awarded through the “Open Research Area (ORA) for the Social Sciences” programme by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR, France), Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, Germany), the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC, UK) and the Nederlands Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO, Netherlands).