Nadina Galle

Nadina Galle
Massachusetts Institute of Technology | MIT · College of Engineering & Architecture

BSc (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology), MSc (Earth Science), PhD (Ecological Engineering)

About

10
Publications
7,606
Reads
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130
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Nadina Galle defined the 'Internet of Nature' (IoN) to provide the framework for deploying emerging technologies to protect, restore, and enhance urban nature. As a Fulbright Scholar at the MIT Senseable City Lab, she iterates several IoN applications such as soil sensors to detect tree root microbes (for tree longevity); high-res satellite imagery to quantify tree health; algorithms to express citizens' opinions about urban parks; and diversity indices for urban forests.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Position
  • Fulbright Scholar
Description
  • The MIT Senseable City Lab focuses on researching and predicting how digital technology is changing the way we describe, design, and occupy cities.
September 2019 - April 2020
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Position
  • PhD Student
December 2017 - December 2020
University College Dublin
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Smart cities are increasingly part of urban sustainability discourses. There is a growing interest in understanding how citizen engagement, connected technology, and data analytics can support sustainable development. Evidence has also repeatedly shown that green infrastructure such as urban forests address diverse urban challenges and are critical...
Article
Full-text available
Many of our cities are going digital. From self-driving cars to smart grids to intelligent traffic signals, these smart cities put data and digital technology to work to drive efficiency and improve the quality of life for citizens. Yet, the natural capital upon which cities rely risks being left behind by the digital revolution. Bringing nature on...
Article
Full-text available
Continued population growth and urbanization is shifting research to consider the quality of urban green space over the quantity of these parks, woods, and wetlands. The quality of urban green space has been hitherto measured by expert assessments, including in-situ observations, surveys, and remote sensing analyses. Location data platforms, such a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Social media services such as TripAdvisor and Foursquare can provide opportunities for users to exchange their opinions about urban green space (UGS). Visitors can exchange their experiences with parks, woods, and wetlands in social communities via social networks. In this work, we implement a unified topic modeling approach to reveal UGS character...
Article
Full-text available
Social media services such as TripAdvisor and Foursquare can provide opportunities for users to exchange their opinions about urban green space (UGS). Visitors can exchange their experiences with parks, woods, and wetlands in social communities via social networks. In this work, we implement a unified topic modeling approach to reveal UGS character...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing recognition of the potential ecosystem services provided by urban forests suggests a need to examine soil quality under urban conditions. Soil quality assessment tools are presently mostly applied in agricultural production, but these approaches must also be evaluated in the urban context. This proof-of-concept exploratory study evaluate...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Soil spatial variability is a major concern when deciding how to collect a representative topsoil sample for laboratory analysis. Sampling design to capture site-specific variability is documented in the agricultural literature, but poorly understood for urban forest soils where soils may be characterized by strong horizontal and vertic...
Article
Full-text available
Tree diversity, on a species-, genus-, and family-level, is an important factor in securing healthy urban forests and providing ecosystem services for billions of city dwellers. Using open-source data on global tree inventories, this study examines (1) the diversity of species, genera, and family of urban street trees in eight cities internationall...
Preprint
Full-text available
Continued population growth and urbanization is shifting research to consider the quality of urban green space over the quantity of these parks, woods, and wetlands. The quality of urban green space has been hitherto measured by expert assessments, including in-situ observations, surveys, and remote sensing analyses. Location data platforms, such a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many of our cities are going digital. From self-driving cars to smart grids to intelligent traffic signals, these smart cities put data and digital technology to work to drive efficiency and improve the quality of life for citizens. Yet, the natural capital upon which cities rely risks being left behind by the digital revolution. Bringing nature on...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Smart cities are becoming more ubiquitous in urban sustainability discourses. There is a growing interest in understanding how citizen engagement, connected technology, and data analytics can support sustainable development. We explore and critically analyze the implications of the smart movement for urban forest and green infrastructure management.
Project
Connecting Nature brings together 29 partner organisations from 16 EU countries including local authorities, communities, industry partners, NGOs and academics. Through Connecting Nature, 11 European cities will invest in multi-million-euro large scale implementation test-beds of nature-based solutions and measure the impact of this approach on climate change adaptation, health and well-being, social cohesion as well as sustainable economic development. As the project develops, it will create similar consortia in China, Korea, Brazil and the Caucuses, building capacity in cities for scaling out nature-based solutions.