Nadège Bault

Nadège Bault
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Psychology

PhD
Lecturer in Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Plymouth; Co-head of the MRI lab, Brain Research and Imaging Centre

About

42
Publications
8,929
Reads
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991
Citations
Citations since 2017
11 Research Items
749 Citations
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Introduction
Nadège Bault currently works at the University of Plymouth, UK. Nadège does research in Cognitive Science, Neuroscience and Neuroeconomics. Their current project is 'Observational learning (fMRI study)'.
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - September 2019
Università degli Studi di Trento
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2012 - September 2014
August 2010 - October 2012
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
October 2007 - October 2010
University of Lyon
Field of study
  • Cognitive neuroscience

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
The disposition for prosocial conduct, which contributes to cooperation as arising during social interaction, requires cortical network dynamics responsive to the development of social ties, or care about the interests of specific interaction partners. Here we formulate a dynamic computational model that accurately predicted how tie formation, driv...
Article
Full-text available
We compared private and social decision making to investigate the neural underpinnings of the effect of social comparison on risky choices. We measured brain activity using functional MRI while participants chose between two lotteries: in the private condition, they observed the outcome of the unchosen lottery, and in the social condition, the outc...
Article
Full-text available
Organization in hierarchical dominance structures is prevalent in animal societies, so a strong preference for higher positions in social ranking is likely to be an important motivation of human social and economic behavior. This preference is also likely to influence the way in which we evaluate our outcome and the outcome of others, and finally t...
Preprint
Full-text available
The importance of prosocial behavior is currently widely acknowledged. This not only holds for the social sciences, including economics, but also the life sciences where this kind of behavior is observed across the evolutionary ladder. Evolutionary continuity consequently suggests that caring for others may be due to both strategic motivations, bas...
Article
Full-text available
Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. Here we assess the effect of this flexibility on the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging by asking 70 independent teams to analyse the same dataset, testing the same 9 ex-ante hypotheses1. The flexibility of analytical approaches is exempl...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, our knowledge concerning the neurobiology of choice has increased tremendously. Research in the field of decision making has identified important brain mechanisms by which a representation of the subjective value of an option is built based on previous experience, retrieved and compared to that of other available options in order t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. To assess the impact of this flexibility on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results, the same dataset was independently analyzed by 70 teams, testing nine ex-ante hypotheses. The flexibility of analytic approaches is exemplified by the fac...
Preprint
Full-text available
Individuals learn by comparing the outcome of chosen and un-chosen actions. A negative counterfactual value signal is generated when this comparison is unfavorable. This can happen in private as well as in social settings-where the foregone outcome results from the choice of another person. We hypothesized that despite sharing similar features such...
Article
Full-text available
https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01372 - Individuals learn by comparing the outcome of chosen and unchosen actions. A negative counterfactual value signal is generated when this comparison is unfavorable. This can happen in private as well as in social settings—where the foregone outcome results from the choice of another person. We hypothesized th...
Article
This paper presents substantial evidence of a simple social tie mechanism that endogenizes people’s care about other individuals under the influence of interaction experiences. The mechanism is rooted in scientific studies from various disciplines. For our evidence, we propose and estimate a dynamic model of tie formation using different experiment...
Article
Full-text available
The unfavorable comparison between the obtained and expected outcomes of our choices may elicit disappointment. When the comparison is made with the outcome of alternative actions, emotions like regret can serve as a learning signal. Previous work showed that both anticipated disappointment and regret influence decisions. In addition, experienced r...
Article
Full-text available
Deficits in decision making (DM) are commonly associated with prefrontal cortical damage, but may occur with multiple sclerosis (MS). There are no data concerning the impact of MS on tasks evaluating DM under explicit risk, where different emotional and cognitive components can be distinguished. We assessed 72 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated adolescent males' decision-making under risk, and the emotional response to decision outcomes, using a probabilistic gambling task designed to evoke counterfactually mediated emotions (relief and regret). Participants were 20 adolescents (aged 9-11), 26 young adolescents (aged 12-15), 20 mid-adolescents (aged 15-18) and 17 a...
Data
Subjective ratings, skin conductance responses (SCR), and heart rate variations for the different emotions. The magnitude of the SCR is computed for the moment in which the outcomes of the two lotteries are displayed (N = 42). (0.06 MB TIF)
Data
Effect of obtained and unobtained payoffs on subjective ratings. A test of the effect of unobtained outcomes on the emotional ratings is provided by the regression. The regression shows that even if the unobtained outcome of the chosen lottery has an effect on the emotional ratings, it influences significantly less the ratings than the outcome of t...
Data
Choice behavior in the bold environment. Same estimate as in table S6, for participants in the bold environment, in the two player condition for late trials (trials>40). Risk significantly predicts choices of subjects in the bold environment. The dsd coefficient is negative, which means individuals minimize the risk when choosing; then this group i...
Data
Effect of obtained and unobtained payoffs on subjective ratings in the two player condition with same choice. (0.07 MB TIF)
Data
Full-text available
Interdependent Utilities Theory (0.06 MB PDF)
Data
Wilcoxon signed-rank test on emotional ratings for negative emotions. The null hypothesis is that the two ratings are the same (N = 42). (0.07 MB TIF)
Data
Wilcoxon signed-rank test on emotional ratings for positive emotions. The null hypothesis is that the two ratings are the same (N = 42). (0.07 MB TIF)
Data
Choice behavior in the prudent environment. The table report the coefficients estimated in the logistic regression of the choice made by participants in the prudent environment, in the two player condition for late trials (trials>40). The dependent variable choice is equal to 1 if the subject chose the lottery 1 and 0 if the subject chose the lotte...
Data
Experienced emotions. The total experienced emotions in each environment averaged across subjects. On a single trial we measured the difference between the obtained outcome and the outcome of the unchosen lottery (in absolute value). For each event we then summed these differences to compute the total value of each experienced emotion. For instance...
Data
Average over subjects of the number of occurrences of each event in both environments. (0.06 MB TIF)
Data
Pairs of lotteries used in the experiment (0.12 MB TIF)
Data
Full-text available
Alternative interpretation: Discussion of the effect of attention (0.01 MB PDF)
Data
The effect of experienced emotions on choice. The table reports the coefficients estimated for the average value of the difference in payment associated with different events in the first 40 trials (early envy and early gloating respectively) on choices made in the last 40 trials. The variables dev, dsd and dsd *loss are as in Table 1. The two last...
Article
Humans decisions are not only driven by rationality but they are strongly influenced by emotions. Neuroscientific evidence shows how the brain attributes affective values to the alternative of our choices in terms of current or anticipated emotional experience. Patterns of reactivation of neural circuitries related to emotional responses are found...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The ability to adapt to new decision environments and to learn from feedback declines with age, resulting in sub-optimal decision-making in elderly. There has been much debate on whether elderly lose their ability to learn from negative feedback. We propose that rather than a specific deficit in punishment vs. reward processing, older adults might be impaired in value normalization. During learning in a specific context, the reward system tunes to adapt to the range of rewards or punishments previously encountered in that context. This value normalization theoretically allows for better discriminating between the values of currently available options.
Project
Individuals learn by comparing the outcome of chosen and un-chosen actions. A negative counterfactual value signal is generated when this comparison is unfavorable. This can happen in private and in social settings - where the foregone outcome is the outcome of an action chosen by others. We hypothesize that despite sharing similar features such as supporting learning, these two counterfactual signals might implicate distinct brain networks. We conducted a neuropsychological study on the role of private and social counterfactual value signals in decision-making.
Project
When making decisions in an uncertain environment, individuals may learn by observing the choice behavior of others. The goal of this study was to investigate whether we discriminately imitate other individuals based on their choice behavior, in order to optimize our own learning. We tested the prediction that learning from observation relies on two signals: the reward prediction error derived from direct experience and a prediction error related to the value of imitation.