Myriam Christine Sander

Myriam Christine Sander
Max Planck Institute for Human Development | MPIB · Center of Lifespan Psychology

Dr. rer. nat.

About

46
Publications
10,517
Reads
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752
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2014 - present
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Position
  • Researcher, Head of a MINERVA research group
June 2011 - March 2014
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2007 - April 2011
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2007 - June 2011
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Field of study
  • Psychology
April 2003 - September 2007
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Field of study
  • Psychology
October 2001 - March 2003
Universität des Saarlandes
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
The human brain encodes information in neural activation patterns. While standard approaches to analyzing neural data focus on brain (de-)activation (e.g., regarding the location, timing, or magnitude of neural responses), multivariate neural pattern similarity analyses target the informational content represented by neural activity. In adults, a n...
Article
Episodic memory declines with advancing adult age. This decline is particularly pronounced when associations between items and their contexts need to be formed. According to theories of neural communication, the precise coupling of gamma power to the phase of the theta rhythm supports associative memory formation. To investigate whether age differe...
Article
Long-standing theories of cognitive aging suggest that memory decline is associated with age-related differences in the way information is neurally represented. Multivariate pattern similarity analyses enabled researchers to take a representational perspective on brain and cognition, and allowed them to study the properties of neural representation...
Article
This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal). This article has been retracted at the request of the authors. During follow-up analyses for a different manuscript, the authors recognized a serious error in their analysis pipeline that raise...
Preprint
Full-text available
Episodic memory declines with advancing adult age. This decline is particularly pronounced when associations between items and their contexts need to be formed. According to theories of neural communication, the precise coupling of gamma power to the phase of the theta rhythm supports associative memory formation. To investigate whether age differe...
Preprint
Long-standing theories of cognitive aging suggest that memory decline is associated with age-related differences in the way information is represented in the brain. In the last years, these hypotheses have been substantiated by novel neuroscientific evidence that was derived from multivariate pattern similarity analyses. This approach enabled resea...
Preprint
Full-text available
The human brain encodes information in neural activation patterns. While standard approaches to analyzing neural data focus on brain (de-)activation (e.g., regarding the location, timing, or magnitude of neural responses), multivariate neural pattern similarity analyses target the informational content represented by neural activity. In adults, a n...
Preprint
Full-text available
One important factor contributing to age-related memory decline is the loss of distinctiveness with which information is represented in brain activity. This loss in neural selectivity may be driven by neural attenuation (i.e., reduced activation to target stimuli) or neural broadening (i.e., increased activation to non-target stimuli). In this fMRI...
Article
Episodic memory decline is a hallmark of cognitive aging and a multifaceted phenomenon. We review studies that target age differences across different memory processing stages, i.e., from encoding to retrieval. The available evidence suggests that age differences during memory formation may affect the quality of memory representations in an age-gra...
Article
The distinctiveness of neural information representation is crucial for successful memory performance but declines with advancing age. Computational models implicate age-related neural dedifferentiation on the level of item representations, but previous studies mostly focused on age differences of categorical information representation in higher-or...
Article
Full-text available
The specificity with which past experiences can be remembered varies across the lifespan, possibly due to differences in how precisely information is encoded. Memory formation can be investigated through repetition effects, the common finding that neural activity is altered when stimuli are repeated. However, whether differences in this indirect me...
Article
Theories of healthy and pathological aging assume a critical role of the locus coeruleus (LC), the main cortical norepinephrine (NE) supply, in shaping late‐life cognition. Postmortem analyses identified the LC as one of the first brain sites that accumulates tau pathology. However, in‐vivo research linking the noradrenergic system to senescent cog...
Preprint
Episodic memory decline is a hallmark of cognitive aging and a multifaceted phenomenon. We review studies that target age differences across different memory processing stages, i.e., from encoding to retrieval. The available evidence cumulates in the proposition that older adults form memories of lower quality than younger adults, which has negativ...
Article
Full-text available
Maintained structural integrity of hippocampal and cortical gray matter may explain why some older adults show rather preserved episodic memory. However, viable measurement models for estimating individual differences in gray matter structural integrity are lacking; instead, findings rely on fallible single indicators of integrity. Here, we introdu...
Article
Our episodic memories vary in their specificity, ranging from a mere sense of familiarity to detailed recollection of the initial experience. Recent work suggests that alpha/beta desynchronization promotes information flow through the cortex, tracking the richness in detail of recovered memory representations. At the same time, as we age, memories...
Preprint
Full-text available
The specificity with which past experiences can be remembered varies across the lifespan, possibly due to differences in how precisely information is encoded. Memory formation can be investigated through repetition effects, the common finding that neural activity is altered when stimuli are repeated. However, whether differences in this indirect me...
Preprint
Full-text available
The distinctiveness of neural information representation is crucial for successful memory performance but declines with advancing age. Computational models implicate age-related neural dedifferentiation on the level of item representations, but previous studies mostly focused on age differences of categorical information representation in higher-or...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our episodic memories vary in their specificity, ranging from a mere sense of familiarity to detailed recollection of the initial experience. Recent work suggests that alpha/beta desynchronization promotes information flow through the cortex, tracking the richness in detail of recovered memory representations. At the same time, as we age, memories...
Article
Selectively attending to relevant information while blocking out distractors is crucial for goal-directed behavior, yet with advancing age, deficits emerge in attentional selectivity. Decrements in attention have been associated with altered noradrenergic activity in animals. However, research linking noradrenergic functioning to attention in aging...
Article
Older adults often report memories of past events that are partly false. To date, age differences in memory errors have primarily been examined after a delay of minutes to hours. However, in real-life situations we rely on memories formed days to weeks in the past. We examined associative memory for unrelated scene-word pairs in younger and older a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Maintained structural integrity of hippocampal and cortical grey matter may explain why some older adults show rather preserved episodic memory. However, viable measurement models for estimating individual differences in grey matter structural integrity are lacking; instead, findings rely on fallible single indicators of integrity. Here, we introdu...
Article
Full-text available
We studied oscillatory mechanisms of memory formation in 48 younger and 51 older adults in an intentional associative memory task with cued recall. While older adults showed lower memory performance than young adults, we found subsequent memory effects (SME) in alpha/beta and theta frequency bands in both age groups. Using logistic mixed effects mo...
Article
Successful consolidation of associative memories relies on the coordinated interplay of slow oscillations and sleep spindles during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This enables the transfer of labile information from the hippocampus to permanent memory stores in the neocortex. During senescence, the decline of the structural and functional int...
Article
Age-related memory decline is associated with changes in neural functioning, but little is known about how aging affects the quality of information representation in the brain. Whereas a long-standing hypothesis of the aging literature links cognitive impairments to less distinct neural representations in old age ("neural dedifferentiation"), memor...
Article
Alertness is fundamental for the efficiency of information processing. A person's level of alertness refers to the system's state of general responsiveness and can be temporarily increased by presenting a neutral warning cue shortly before an event occurs (Posner and Petersen, 1990). However, effects of alerts on subsequent stimulus processing are...
Preprint
Full-text available
Due to hemispheric specialization of the human brain, neural signatures of visual working memory (WM) performance are expected to differ between tasks involving verbal versus spatial memoranda. Theories of cognitive aging suggest a reduction of hemispheric specialization in older adults. Using behavioral and neural WM capacity markers, we assessed...
Preprint
Full-text available
Older adults often report memories of past events that are partly or entirely false. To date, age differences in false memory have been examined primarily soon after the initial event. However, in real-life situations we rely on memories acquired across a lifetime. We examined associative memory in younger and older adults after 24 hours and 8 days...
Preprint
Full-text available
Selectively attending to relevant information while blocking out distractors is crucial for goal-directed behavior, yet with advancing age, deficits emerge in attentional selectivity. Decrements in attention have been associated with altered noradrenergic activity in animals. However, research linking noradrenergic functioning to attention in aging...
Article
Full-text available
Memory consolidation during sleep relies on the precisely timed interaction of rhythmic neural events. Here, we investigate differences in slow oscillations (SO; 0.5–1 Hz), sleep spindles (SP), and their coupling across the adult human lifespan and ask whether observed alterations relate to the ability to retain associative memories across sleep. W...
Preprint
Full-text available
Successful consolidation of associative memories relies on the coordinated interplay of slow oscillations and sleep spindles during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, enabling the transfer of labile information from the hippocampus to permanent memory stores in the neocortex. During senescence, the decline of the structural and functional integri...
Preprint
Full-text available
We studied oscillatory mechanisms of successful memory formation in 47 younger and 52 older adults in an intentional associative memory task with cued recall. While older adults showed reduced memory performance, we found subsequent memory effects (SME) in alpha/beta and theta frequency bands in both age groups. Using logistic mixed effect models,...
Preprint
Full-text available
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/528620v1 Age-related memory decline is associated with changes in neural functioning but little is known about how aging affects the quality of information representation in the brain. Whereas a long-standing hypothesis of the aging literature links cognitive impairments to less distinct neural representatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Alertness is fundamental for the efficiency of information processing. A person’s level of alertness refers to the system’s state of general responsiveness, and can be temporarily increased by presenting a neutral warning cue shortly before an event occurs (Posner & Petersen, 1990). However, effects of alerts on subsequent stimulus processing are l...
Preprint
Full-text available
Memory consolidation during sleep relies on the precisely timed interaction of rhythmic neural events. Here, we investigate differences in slow oscillations (SO) and sleep spindles (SP) and their coupling across the adult human lifespan and ask whether observed alterations relate to the ability to retain associative memories across sleep. We demons...
Article
Full-text available
Older adults are more likely than younger adults to falsely recall past episodes that occurred differently or not at all. We examined whether older adults’ propensity for false associative memory is related to declines in postretrieval monitoring processes and their modulation with varying memory representations. Younger (N = 20) and older adults (...
Article
In lifespan studies, large within-group heterogeneity with regard to behavioral and neuronal data is observed. This casts doubt on the validity of group-statistics-based approaches to understand age-related changes on cognitive and neural levels. Recent progress in brain-computer interface research demonstrates the potential of machine learning tec...
Article
Full-text available
Memory performance increases during childhood and adolescence, and decreases in old age. Among younger adults, better ability to bind items to the context in which they were experienced is associated with higher working memory performance (Oberauer, 2005). Here, we examined the extent to which age differences in binding contribute to life span age...
Article
We suggest that working memory (WM) performance can be conceptualized as the interplay of low-level feature binding processes and top-down control, relating to posterior and frontal brain regions and their interaction in a distributed neural network. We propose that due to age-differential trajectories of posterior and frontal brain regions top-dow...
Article
We recently introduced a two-component model of the mechanisms underlying age differences in memory functioning across the lifespan. According to this model, memory performance is based on associative and strategic components. The associative component is relatively mature by middle childhood, whereas the strategic component shows a maturational la...
Article
Efficient encoding of relevant information and suppression of irrelevant information influence working memory (WM) performance, which is limited and declines in adulthood. A cued Sternberg WM task and electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) were used to investigate encoding and control operations in response to to-be-remembered (REM) and not-to-be...
Article
Full-text available
Estimates of working memory (WM) capacity increase in children, peak in young adulthood, and decline thereafter. Despite this symmetry, the mechanisms causing capacity increments in childhood may differ from those causing decline in old age. The contralateral delay activity (CDA) of the electroencephalogram, an event-related difference wave with a...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) shows a gradual increase during childhood, followed by accelerating decline from adulthood to old age. To examine these lifespan differences more closely, we asked 34 children (10-12 years), 40 younger adults (20-25 years), and 39 older adults (70-75 years) to perform a color change detection task. Load levels and encoding durat...