Mylene M Mariette

Mylene M Mariette
Deakin University · Centre for Integrative Ecology

PhD

About

56
Publications
13,476
Reads
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1,537
Citations
Citations since 2017
26 Research Items
1000 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - present
Deakin University
Position
  • Alfred Deakin postdoctoral fellow
January 2011 - April 2013
Université Jean Monnet
Position
  • Fyssen postdoctoral fellow
September 2006 - August 2010
Macquarie University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
As the world warms, understanding the fundamental mechanisms available to organisms to protect themselves from thermal stress is becoming ever more important. Heat shock proteins are highly conserved molecular chaperones which serve to maintain cellular processes during stress, including thermal extremes. Developing animals may be particularly vuln...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding animal physiological adaptations for tolerating heat, and the causes of inter-individual variation, is key for predicting climate change impacts on biodiversity. Recently, a novel mechanism for transgenerational heat adaptation was identified in a desert-adapted bird, where parents acoustically signal hot conditions to embryos. Prenat...
Article
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Climate change is pushing organisms closer to their physiological limits. Animals can reduce heat exposure – and the associated risks of lethal hyperthermia and dehydration – by retreating into thermal refuges. Refuge use nonetheless reduces foraging and reproductive activities, and thereby potentially fitness. Behavioural responses to heat thus de...
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Sound is an essential source of information in many taxa and can notably be used by embryos to programme their phenotypes for postnatal environments. While underlying mechanisms are mostly unknown, there is growing evidence for the involvement of mitochondria—main source of cellular energy (i.e. ATP)—in developmental programming processes. Here, we...
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During embryonic gonadal development, the supporting cell lineage is the first cell type to differentiate, giving rise to Sertoli cells in the testis and pre-granulosa cells in the ovary. These cells are thought to direct other gonadal cell lineages down the testis or ovarian pathways, including the germline. Recent research has shown that, in cont...
Article
Conditions experienced prenatally, by modulating developmental processes, have lifelong effects on individual phenotypes and fitness, ultimately influencing population dynamics. In addition to maternal biochemical cues, prenatal sound is emerging as a potent alternative source of information to direct embryonic development. Recent evidence suggests...
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Across multiple taxa, prenatal exposure to rhythmic sound can promote neural development and alter postnatal behavior. In recent studies using zebra finches, stimulating embryos with parental “heat calls” affected their begging behavior as nestlings and song learning as adults. This song learning effect is potentially mediated by broader changes to...
Article
Biologists have long appreciated the critical role energy turnover plays in understanding variation in performance and fitness among individuals. Whole-organism metabolic studies have provided key insights into fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes. However, constraints operating at subcellular levels—such as those operating within the...
Article
Prenatal auditory sensitivity occurs across taxa, and is increasingly understood as playing a significant role in broad cognitive development. Yet, until recently, the possibility that prenatal sounds may provide information for embryos to finetune their phenotypes to current environments had not been considered. Emerging evidence in birds show tha...
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Full-text available
Animals thriving in hot deserts rely on extraordinary adaptations and thermoregulatory capacities to cope with heat. Uncovering such adaptations, and how they may be favoured by selection, is essential for predicting climate change impacts. Recently, the arid-adapted zebra finch was discovered to program their offspring’s development for heat, by p...
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There is increasing evidence for species using information from heterospecifics to assess predation risk or habitat quality. Notably, a series of influential studies, using geometric symbols added to nest boxes, has shown that migratory flycatchers copy tits’ apparent nest-site preferences and settle in nest boxes bearing the same symbol as tits’ n...
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Intense heat waves are occurring more frequently, with concomitant increases in the risk of catastrophic avian mortality events via lethal dehydration or hyperthermia. We quantified the risks of lethal hyperthermia and dehydration for 10 Australian arid-zone avifauna species during the 21st century, by synthesizing thermal physiology data on evapor...
Article
Animals have well-documented individual differences in their behaviour, including in their response to stressful stimuli. The physiological bases for the repeatability of these traits has been the focus of much research in recent years, in an attempt to explain the mechanistic drivers for behavioral syndromes. Whilst a range of studies have demonst...
Article
In many birds, there is significant variation in egg size both across and within clutches that remains to be explained. Birds lay one egg per day and in hot climates, the first laid eggs may start to develop before the laying of the rest of the clutch is complete, through warming by the ambient air temperature. Here, we test the hypothesis that in...
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Acoustic communication is central to many social interactions between family members. Whilst song and begging calls have been extensively studied, in this review I focus on familial interactions, where acoustic communication plays a critical role but has often been overlooked. I show that considering acoustic information transfer challenges the tra...
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Exposing wild-caught eggs to audio playbacks in the lab reveals that avian embryos can communicate predation risk to their siblings before hatching. This prenatal communication, which possibly occurs through vibrational cues, coordinates the developmental trajectories of the clutch.
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Abstract Sound is arguably the external cue most accessible to embryos of many species, and as such may constitute an unrivalled source of early information. Recent evidence shows that prenatal sounds, similarly to maternal effects, may shape developmental trajectories. Establishing whether parental vocalisations are signals directed at embryos, or...
Article
Maternal hormones are thought to play an important role in determining the rate of evolutionary adaptation. Previous avian studies have shown that the transfer of maternally derived hormones, such as progesterone and testosterone, to the egg, affects many aspects of offspring development. In contrast, the impact of maternal corticosterone (CORT) is...
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Songbirds are important models for understanding the mechanisms and fitness consequences of imitative vocal learning. Although the effects of early-life environmental and social conditions on song learning are well-established, the impact of early sound exposure has received surprisingly little attention. Yet recent evidence hints at auditory sensi...
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The ratites are a distinctive clade of flightless birds, typified by the emu and ostrich that have acquired a range of unique anatomical characteristics since diverging from basal Aves at least 100 million years ago. The emu possesses a vestigial wing with a single digit and greatly reduced forelimb musculature. However, the embryological basis of...
Article
The most commonly documented morphological response across many taxa to climatic variation across their range follows Bergmann's rule, which predicts larger body size in colder climates. In observational data from wild zebra finches breeding across a range of temperatures in the spring and summer, we show that this relationship appears to be driven...
Article
The exact genetic mechanism regulating avian gonadal sex differentiation has still not been completely resolved. The most likely scenario involves a dosage mechanism, whereby the Z-linked DMRT1 gene triggers testis development. However, the possibility still exists that the female-specific W chromosome may harbour an ovarian determining factor. In...
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Our understanding of fundamental organismal biology has been disproportionately influenced by studies of a relatively small number of ‘model’ species extensively studied in captivity. Laboratory populations of model species are commonly subject to a number of forms of past and current selection that may affect experimental outcomes. Here, we examin...
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Social networks are often inferred from spatial associations, but other parameters like acoustic communication are likely to play a central role in within group interactions. However, it is currently difficult to determine which individual initiates vocalizations, or who responds to whom. To this aim, we designed a method that allows analyzing grou...
Article
Full-text available
In many species, embryos can perceive and learn external sounds. Yet, the possibility that parents may use these embryonic capacities to alter their offspring's developmental trajectories has not been considered. Here, we demonstrate that zebra finch parents acoustically signal high ambient temperatures (above 26°C) to their embryos. We show that e...
Article
Nestlings beg to parents to communicate their need. Nevertheless, the specific signal driving parental care remains only partially understood. No study to date has been able to link a specific change in the physiological state of the young with, on the one hand, the modulation of a precise component of its begging behavior and, on the other hand, a...
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The formation of social bonds outside the mated pair is not frequently reported in monogamous birds, although it may be expected in some species like rooks, living in groups all year round. Here we explore the social structure of captive adult rooks over three breeding seasons. We recorded proximities and affiliations (i.e., allofeeding, allopreeni...
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In species with biparental care, individuals adjust their workload to that of their partner to either compensate or match its investment. Communication within a pair might be crucial for achieving this adjustment. Zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, form life-long monogamous pair bonds, in which partners are highly coordinated and both incubate the...
Article
The formation of social bonds outside the mated pair is not frequently reported in monogamous birds, although it may be expected in some species like rooks, living in groups all year round. Here we explore the social structure of captive adult rooks over three breeding seasons. We recorded proximities and affiliations (i.e., allofeeding, allopreeni...
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Full-text available
Despite the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) being used as a model species in behavioural science, the size and composition of social groups in which individuals typically live in the wild when they are not breeding is not well described. We observed the group size and composition of free-ranging zebra finches during two brief non-breeding periods...
Data
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En entendant les termes « réseaux sociaux », vous penserez probablement à Facebook ou Twitter. Dans ce livre, ce terme est évidemment à comprendre autrement. Les animaux interagissent et communiquent notamment au sujet de la nourriture et de la reproduction. Dans un milieu écologique donné, les espèces tissent des liens de compétition, d’exclusion,...
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Photoperiod and the hormonal response it triggers are key determinants of reproductive timing in birds. However, other cues and physiological traits may permit flexibility in the timing of breeding and perhaps facilitate adaptation to global change. Opportunistic breeders are excellent models to study the adaptive significance of this flexibility,...
Book
Full-text available
En entendant les termes « réseaux sociaux », vous penserez probablement à Facebook ou Twitter. Dans ce livre, ce terme est évidemment à comprendre autrement. Les animaux interagissent et communiquent notamment au sujet de la nourriture et de la reproduction. Dans un milieu écologique donné, les espèces tissent des liens de compétition, d’exclusion,...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Sexual conflict over parental care relies on the fundamental assumption that parents do not share the cost of their partner's effort on future reproduction. However, this is unlikely to be true whenever partners breed together more than once. In that case, individuals should try to optimize the cost and benefits for the pair, rather than o...
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Full-text available
Social interactions with adults are often critical for the development of mating behaviours. However, the potential role of other primary social partners such as juvenile counterparts is rarely considered. Most interestingly, it is not known whether interactions with juvenile females improve males' courtship and whether, similar to the winner and l...
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Full-text available
The foraging benefits of coloniality, whereby colony members exchange information about food location, have been suggested as a primary factor influencing the evolution of coloniality. However, despite its longstanding popularity, this hypothesis has rarely been tested experimentally. Here, we conducted a field experiment in the wild Zebra Finch Ta...
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Conspecific nesting density affects many aspects of breeding biology, as well as habitat selection decisions. However, the large variations in breeding density observed in many species are yet to be fully explained. Here, we investigated the settlement patterns in a colonial species with variable breeding density and where resource distribution cou...
Article
The zebra finch is the model species for the study of the evolution of birdsong, female song preferences, song learning and the neural processes underlying song learning and production. Despite this, almost all work to date in these fields has focused on domesticated zebra finches in captivity and remarkably little is known about song preferences,...
Article
Full-text available
Nest visit synchrony, whereby adults coordinate their visits to the nest, has been documented in several species of cooperative breeders. Visit synchrony may reduce nest predation rate or sibling competition, or instead follow from synchronisation of other behaviours, such as foraging. However, nest visit synchrony has rarely been considered in spe...
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Full-text available
Although the costs of parental care are at the foundations of optimal-parental-investment theory, our understanding of the nature of the underlying costs is limited by the difficulty of measuring variation in foraging effort. We simultaneously measured parental provisioning and foraging behavior in a free-living population of Zebra Finches (Taeniop...
Article
Bird vocal duets are joint displays where two individuals, generally a mated pair, produce temporally coordinated vocalizations. Duets may contribute to pair bond maintenance, mate guarding or collaborative defence of resources. The degree of coordination between mates and the variety of vocalizations, however, vary considerably. Although only 3–4....
Article
In recent years, it has become evident that frequency dependence in the attractiveness of a particular phenotype to mates can contribute to the maintenance of polymorphism. However, these preferences for rare and unfamiliar male phenotypes have only been demonstrated in small, controlled experiments. Here, we tested the preference for unfamiliar ma...
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Full-text available
The addition of red and green color bands is a commonly used method for manipulating male attractiveness in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), providing insight into the study of maternal investment and sexual selection. The addition of artificial ornaments has been assumed to manipulate a females' perception of the male, rather than affecting...
Article
The captive zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, has become one of the key vertebrate model systems for studying a range of behavioural, physiological and neurological phenomena. In particular, this species has played a key role in developing our understanding of sexual selection and sperm competition. In contrast with the large number of studies usin...
Article
Divergent selection pressures among populations can result not only in significant differentiation in morphology, physiology and behaviour, but also in how these traits are related to each other, thereby driving the processes of local adaptation and speciation. In the Australian zebra finch, we investigated whether domesticated stock, bred in capti...
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Full-text available
Nest-boxes have been used widely and for many decades in Europe and North America to increase avian reproductive success in species management and conservation programs and to increase the amenability and efficiency with which a species can be studied. Here we describe the establishment of a breeding population of Zebra Finches using nest-boxes in...
Article
Despite an extensive literature on inbreeding depression in a variety of traits, relatively little is known about the effects of inbreeding on patterns of sexual behaviour. In this study, we use the guppy Poecilia reticulata to investigate the influence of parental relatedness (full-sib. vs. unrelated matings) on sexual behaviour and colour pattern...

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Project (1)
Project
We want to understand to what extent vocal communication within the pair bond is related to the social partnership during the reproductive period