Munyaradzi Manyanga

Munyaradzi Manyanga
Great Zimbabwe University · History Archaeology and Development Studies

PhD in Archaeology

About

43
Publications
47,760
Reads
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698
Citations
Citations since 2017
20 Research Items
457 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - April 2013
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2010 - April 2013
University of the Witwatersrand
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2008 - October 2010
University of Pretoria
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (43)
Article
Full-text available
Ancient pottery from the Nyanga agricultural complex (CE 1300–1900) in north-eastern Zimbabwe enjoys more than a century of archaeological research. Though several studies dedicated to the pottery have expanded the frontiers of knowledge about the peopling of Bantu-speaking agropastoral societies in this part of southern Africa, we know little abou...
Article
Full-text available
This paper engages with the historiography of the relationship between Mapungubwe (AD 1220-1290) and Great Zimbabwe (AD 1000-1700), two examples of prominent centres of power in precolonial southern Africa. Separated as the sites were by just over 300 kilometres, archaeologists have always sought to establish cultural connections between them. From...
Article
Full-text available
The general conviction in the Iron Age archaeology of southern Zambezia is that drylands such as the Shashi region are marginal landscapes that did not host any significant food producing communities in the past. Resultantly, for those communities that occupied these landscapes, their settlement histories have been always portrayed as short-lived,...
Article
Archaeomagentic research in the Mount Buhwa area of south-central Zimbabwe focused on a Silver Leaves village (2030CB19) and the famous Gokomere site of Mabveni (2030AD5). At both sites, in situ daga features were selected for sampling. These features were the remains of granaries whose burnings correlate with known droughts. The droughts, ceramics...
Preprint
Full-text available
The present study explores the archaeometallurgy of flexible cuprous wound wires recovered from two precolonial Shona centres of power, Jahunda and Little Mapela, separated by 60 kilometres in Gwanda, southwestern Zimbabwe. Widely believed to have been fashion accessories, archaeologists have traditionally consigned such objects to appendices in si...
Book
Full-text available
Dissatisfaction has matured in Africa and elsewhere around the fact that often, the dominant frameworks for interpreting the continent’s past are not rooted on the continent’s value system and philosophy. This creates knowledge that does not make sense especially to local communities. The big question therefore is can Africans develop theories that...
Article
Full-text available
The paucity of Southern Hemisphere archeomagnetic data limits the resolution of paleosecular variation models. At the same time, important changes in the modern and historical field, including the recent dipole decay, appear to originate in this region. Here a new directional record from southern Africa is presented from analysis of Iron Age (ca. 4...
Article
Full-text available
The World Heritage Site of Great Zimbabwe is one of the most iconic and largest archaeological settlements in Africa. It was the hub of direct and indirect trade which internally connected various areas of southern Africa, and externally linked them with East Africa and the Near and Far East. Archaeologists believe that at its peak, Great Zimbabwe...
Chapter
Archaeologists are accustomed to the idea that metallurgy is the domain of men. Anything outside this framework in the recent and distant past has always been considered an exception. This article exposes such an exception among the Murazvo family where, in defiance of the male norm, the chief smith is a woman who performs several livelihood crafts...
Chapter
Archaeologists are accustomed to the idea that metallurgy is the domain of men. Anything outside this framework in the recent and distant past has always been considered an exception. This article exposes such an exception among the Murazvo family where, in defiance of the male norm, the chief smith is a woman who performs several livelihood crafts...
Chapter
Full-text available
This study acknowledges that rock art exhibits evidence for regional diversity with differences in the preferred animal of depiction. Research on the rock art of Jahunda communal area, Gwanda, has shown that the giraffe is the most represented animal. The giraffe paintings were therefore chosen for investigation on the understanding that their sign...
Chapter
Full-text available
Southern Africa’s diverse habitats accommodate a wide variety of wild species which have been hunted for as long as humans have been in existence. A perception of the past human-animal interactions have been popularised in archaeology and related disciplines. Humanity’s early days are thought to have been characterised by a dependency on hunting an...
Chapter
Full-text available
Language is the most important conveyor of meaning and culture, elements which are often lost in translation, especially when such translation is across languages from distant cultural zones. For example, translations of indigenous African languages into English and French, particularly during the colonial period, frequently distorted the meaning o...
Chapter
Full-text available
Archaeologists are accustomed to the idea that metallurgy is the domain of men. Anything outside this framework in the recent and distant past has always been considered an exception. This article exposes such an exception among the Murazvo family where, in defiance of the male norm, the chief smith is a woman who performs several livelihood crafts...
Article
Full-text available
The Zimbabwe Culture appeared in the 11th century ad as the first complex state system of southern Africa, with a trade network that extended as far as the Indian Ocean. Now Shadreck Chirikure and his team have found evidence for the earliest origins of this sophisticated culture, forcing a radical rethink about the emergence of this advanced socio...
Article
Full-text available
Great Zimbabwe is one of the most iconic sites in southern Africa and indeed the world, but like so many famous monuments it has suffered from the attention of early excavators who have destroyed key categories of evidence. Chronology is crucial to understanding the development of the various elements of Great Zimbabwe and its relationship to other...
Article
Full-text available
Across the globe, the emergence of complex societies excites intense academic debate in archaeology and allied disciplines. Not surprisingly, in southern Africa the traditional assumption that the evolution of socio-political complexity began with ideological transformations from K2 to Mapungubwe between CE1200 and 1220 is clouded in controversy. I...
Poster
Full-text available
Climate change, drought, seasonal variability in rainfall and political instability present additional challenges to food security in Southern Africa. A look into the recent and distant past through the lenses of archaeology, ethnography and history shows that these recent developments are not new and have been a constant feature among agro-pastora...
Article
Full-text available
Much is known about the economy and spatial organization of Zimbabwe culture entities of Mapungubwe, Great Zimbabwe and Khami but less in terms of their origins and relationship with each other. Based on little tangible evidence, it is believed and widely accepted that the societies based at Mapungubwe (ad 1220–1290), Great Zimbabwe (ad 1300–1450)...
Chapter
Full-text available
Political independence in 1980, heralded a new era in Zimbabwean archaeology as the state control that characterized colonial archaeology paved way to an evidence and science based discipline. Today, Zimbabwe’s pre colonial past is fairly understood on the basis of sound archaeological practice and convincing interpretive frameworks. This book prov...
Chapter
Full-text available
Political independence in 1980, heralded a new era in Zimbabwean archaeology as the state control that characterized colonial archaeology paved way to an evidence and science based discipline. Today, Zimbabwe’s pre colonial past is fairly understood on the basis of sound archaeological practice and convincing interpretive frameworks. This book prov...
Chapter
Full-text available
Political independence in 1980, heralded a new era in Zimbabwean archaeology as the state control that characterized colonial archaeology paved way to an evidence and science based discipline. Today, Zimbabwe’s pre colonial past is fairly understood on the basis of sound archaeological practice and convincing interpretive frameworks. This book prov...
Article
Full-text available
The archaeological identity of northeastern Zimbabwe beyond the Nyanga highlands is still poorly understood owing to its marginal location and a lingering perception that the semi-arid regions of southern Africa were never areas of settlement choice by pre-colonial farmers. Geographically, northeastern Zimbabwe is important in the archaeological di...
Article
Full-text available
The southern African recent past is replete with examples of elite settlements, some of which were occupied sequentially, and by different rulers. Shona, Venda and Tswana traditions identify the many dry stone walled capitals with former kings who ruled during different reigns. This historical reality is often not factored when considering the issu...
Article
Full-text available
The application of participatory management has had varied success in the field of heritage management depending on the context in which it has been applied, and the evidence from some heritage sites in sub‐Saharan Africa reveals mixed results; some far from satisfactory. Most of the goals – particularly those aimed at involving local communities i...
Book
Full-text available
A study of the bones from KoBulawayo, the late nineteenth century capital of the Ndebele state, shows that domestic stock, cattle, sheep and goats, were the primary animals exploited. A range of wild animals and birds were also found as represented by small numbers of bones and these included pangolin, python, lion and leopard. Many of these wild s...
Book
Full-text available
The general perception today is that the Shashi-Limpopo Basin in southern Africa is hot and dry and not conducive to human habitation. Today there is no doubt that the Shashi-Limpopo Basin has been home to many communities throughout the pre-historical period. A study of the changing ecological conditions in the Mateke Hills and the Shashi-Limpopo...
Book
Full-text available
The general perception today is that the Shashi-Limpopo Basin in southern Africa is hot and dry and not conducive to human habitation. Today there is no doubt that the Shashi-Limpopo Basin has been home to many communities throughout the pre-historical period. A study of the changing ecological conditions in the Mateke Hills and the Shashi-Limpopo...
Article
Full-text available
Manyanga, M. 2006. Resilient Landscapes: socio-environmental dynamics in the Shashi-Limpopo Basin, southern Zimbabwe c. AD 800 to the present. Uppsala, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, (301pages., 61 figures, 43 plates, 8 appendices). The general perception today is that the Shashi-Limpopo Basin in southern Africa is hot and dry and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent years, cultural heritage has been used as a way of empowering local communities, particularly in situations where they have been denied access or have been alienated from their heritage. Under the guise of the so-called African Renaissance, cultural heritage has been used as a rallying point by local communities in their demands for acces...
Book
Full-text available
Recent research in south eastern Zimbabwe shows that the region was occupied in prehistoric times. The hot dry climate, unpredictable variable rainfall patterns and the presence of tsetse fly has always been viewed as a major deterrent to human occupation in the southeastern lowveld. Archaeological surveys have revealed evidence of widespread agro-...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research in the south-eastern region of Zimbabwe shows that it was intensively occupied during the early 2nd millennium AD. The hot, dry climate, the low, variable rainfall and the presence of tsetse fly have always been viewed as a major deterrent to human occupation in this lowveld territory. Archaeological surveys have produced a range of...

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The project seeks to understand the development of the pre-colonial societies in the semi-arid Shashi-Limpopo Basin of southern Africa. Archaeologically, the region is best known for the development of the early state systems like Mapela and Mapungubwe. Through archaeological evidence, historical sources, ethnography and landscape analysis the project seeks to investigate the pre-colonial communities of the basin and how they interacted with the environment. It is anticipated that the project will result in a consolidated database of archaeological sites and informed academic debates that will form the basis for future research and a usable past for southern Africa.
Project
(i) harmonizing archaeological and environmental datasets across southern Africa through time (ii) complementing the archaeological and environmental data with historical sources and travelogues to amplify aspects of land use and land cover in southern Africa.