Mrinal Bhattacharjee

Mrinal Bhattacharjee
Long Island University | LIU · Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

PhD

About

32
Publications
6,295
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810
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
224 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 2003 - present
Long Island University
March 1995 - August 2003
Columbia University
September 1985 - February 1995
University of Texas at Austin

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Organic extract of Rhubarb (Rheum officinale) roots is known to have several medicinal uses. However, not much research has been done with the rhubarb stalk. The aim of this research is to evaluate the anti-bacterial and anti-proliferative effects of the aqueous extract from rhubarb stalks. The crude aqueous extract was further purified using anion...
Article
Objective To determine the mechanism of growth inhibition of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans by Maillard reaction products (MRP). Design Growth and cell viabilities in the presence or absence of MRP were measured for both the rough and smooth variants of the bacteria. Effects of addition of ferrous and ferric ions on the inhibition of the ba...
Article
Aim: To demonstrate that myrrh oil preferentially kills nongrowing bacteria and causes no resistance development. Method: Growth inhibition was determined on regular plates or plates without nutrients, which were later overlaid with soft agar containing nutrients to continue growth. Killing experiments were done in broth and in buffer without nu...
Article
Full-text available
The periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is extremely sensitive to even a mildly acidic pH resulting from metabolic acids secreted during growth, losing viability rapidly as the pH goes below 6.0. Cells grown at high glucose concentration grow fast but rapidly lose viability. However, if the cells are grown at low glucose con...
Chapter
Widespread use and misuse of penicillin and other antibiotics have resulted in development of resistance most antibiotics. The mechanisms by which microorganisms develop resistance to antibiotics are discussed. Topics covered include acquisition of point mutations and antibiotic resistance genes, methods of transfer of resistance genes between bact...
Chapter
Structure of the bacterial cell wall, the metabolic pathway for the biosynthesis of cell wall, and various antibiotics affecting various stages of cell wall synthesis are presented. Mechanisms of action of the antibiotics and the mechanisms of resistance development to the antibiotics are discussed. The antibiotics include fosfomycin, cycloserine,...
Chapter
Antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis are discussed. Background biochemistry information on translation is provided. Antibiotics presented include puromycin, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins oxazolidinones, mupirocins, and peptide deformylase inhibitors. Mechanisms of action of the antib...
Chapter
This chapter includes a discussion of antifungal, antimalarial, and antiviral drugs. Similarities and differences of these with antibacterial antibiotics are discussed. Drugs presented include amphotericin B, nystatin, azoles, allylamines, morpholines, fluoropyrimidines, DDT, quinine, chloroquine, pyrimethamine, artemisinin, proguanil, amantadine,...
Chapter
This chapter is an introduction to antibiotics. Topics discussed are definition of antibiotics, characteristics of an ideal antibiotic, history of antibiotics, discovery of the first antibiotics, penicillin, gramicidin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, etc. Background biochemistry information needed for understanding mechanisms of actio...
Chapter
Antibiotics that inhibit synthesis of nucleic acids including DNA and RNA are presented. Background biochemistry information on structure of DNA, replication, and transcription is provided. Antibiotics discussed include DNA intercalators, topoisomerase inhibitors such as nalidixic acid and fluoroquinolones, nitroheterocycles such as nitroimidazoles...
Chapter
Antibiotics as well as antiseptics and disinfectants that affect the bacterial cell membrane and other structural targets are discussed. Background biochemistry information on lipids and membranes is provided. The antibiotics include gramicidin, tyrocidine, polymyxin, daptomycin, bacteriocins, lantibiotics, triclosan, isoniazid, magainin, and defen...
Chapter
Antimetabolites as antibiotics that inhibit synthesis of nucleotides needed for nucleic acid synthesis and their mechanisms of action are discussed. Background biochemistry on folic acid metabolism is included. Antibiotics presented are sulfa drugs, p-aminosalicylic acid, dapsone, trimethoprim, and fluorouracil. Methotrexate is discussed as an anti...
Book
This textbook discusses how the various types of antibiotics and related drugs work to cure infections. Then it delves into the very serious matter of how bacteria are becoming resistant to these antibiotics. Appropriate for a one-semester course at either the graduate or advanced undergraduate level, this textbook contains worked examples of (1) e...
Article
Sensitivity or resistance of microorganisms to known or potential antimicrobial compounds is most often determined by the zone of inhibition test, also known as disk diffusion test or Kirby–Bauer test.1, 2 The test is widely used and helps physicians decide whether or not to prescribe a certain antibiotic for an infected patient. The procedure for...
Article
Fast reactions mediated by microwaves are often attributed by many to non-thermal effect. We show here that rapid formation of Maillard reaction products during microwave sterilization of growth medium results from concentration effect and not any non-thermal effect. This leads to an improved method for microwave sterilization of growth media.
Article
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), a capnophilic facultative anaerobe, is associated with localized aggressive periodontitis and endocarditis. When grown in broth, the cells begin to die rapidly after overnight growth. The cells also often lose viability on plates within a few days. The aim of t...
Article
Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans is the causative agent of localized aggressive periodontitis and endocarditis. The bacteria grow slowly even in a rich medium and rapidly lose viability after about 19 h of growth. One of the reasons for the slow growth and for the decreased viability is the conventional method of making growth...
Article
Intracellular pathogenic organisms such as salmonellae and shigellae are able to evade the effects of many antibiotics because the drugs are not able to penetrate the plasma membrane. In addition, these bacteria may be able to transfer genes within cells while protected from the action of drugs. The primary mode by which virulence and antibiotic re...
Article
tfoX (sxy) is a regulatory gene needed to turn on competence genes. Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) actinomycetemcomitans has a tfoX gene that is important for transformation. We cloned this gene on an IncQ plasmid downstream of the inducible tac promoter. When this plasmid was resident in cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans and tfoX was induced, th...
Article
Full-text available
Endothelial cell barrier (EC) properties regulate blood tissue fluid flux. To determine the role of endothelial-matrix interactions in barrier regulation, we induced cell shrinkage by exposing confluent endothelial monolayers to hyperosmolarity. The dominant effect of a 15-min hyperosmolar exposure was an increase in the trans-endothelial electrica...
Article
Full-text available
Cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a gram-negative pathogen responsible for an aggressive form of juvenile periodontitis, form tenaciously adherent biofilms on solid surfaces. The bacteria produce long fibrils of bundled pili, which are required for adherence. Mutations in flp-1, which encodes the major subunit of the pili, or any of se...
Article
Full-text available
The gram-negative coccobacillus, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, is the putative agent for localized juvenile periodontitis, a particularly destructive form of periodontal disease in adolescents. This bacterium has also been isolated from a variety of other infections, notably endocarditis. Fresh clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans...
Article
Full-text available
Transposon mutagenesis in bacteria generally requires efficient delivery of a transposon suicide vector to allow the selection of relatively infrequent transposition events. We have developed an IS903-based transposon mutagenesis system for diverse gram-negative bacteria that is not limited by transfer efficiency. The transposon, IS903phikan, carri...
Article
MobA protein, encoded by the broad host-range plasmid R1162, is required for conjugal mobilization of this plasmid. The protein is an essential part of the relaxosome, and is also necessary for the termination of strand transfer. In vitro, MobA is a nuclease specific for one of the two DNA strands of the origin of transfer (oriT). The protein can c...
Article
Dextransucrase from Streptococcus sanguis 10558 was found to synthesize alpha-(1-->6), alpha-(1-->3), and alpha-(1-->2) linkages during an acceptor-dependent glucosyl transfer reaction. Normally, new glucosyl residues are added at C-6 of monosaccharide acceptors. However, sugars blocked at C-6 also can serve as good acceptors. The disaccharide and...
Article
Full-text available
Conjugal transfer of the broad-host-range plasmid R1162 is initiated and terminated at the nic site within the 38-bp origin of transfer (oriT). Termination involves ligation of the transferred single strand by the plasmid-encoded MobA protein. Several different assays were used to identify the oriT DNA required for termination. For plasmids contain...
Article
The acceptor substrate specificity of dextransucrase from Streptococcus sanguis 10558 was examined utilizing analogs of methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside. The analogs include a series of α-methyl glycosides of several epimers, derivatives blocked at position 6, 6 blocked epimers, several β-methyl derivatives, and L-sugars. The products formed during react...
Article
The polypeptide encoded by a segment of a gene required for the conjugal mobilization of the broad host-range plasmid R1162 has been purified as a β-galactosidase fusion protein. The hybrid protein binds specifically to a small, double-stranded DNA fragment containing the origin of transfer (oriT), and specifically cleaves orIT single-stranded DNA...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanism-based inactivation of pyridoxal phosphate-dependent histidine decarboxylase by (S)-alpha-(fluoromethyl)histidine was studied. The molar ratio of inactivator to enzyme subunit required for complete inactivation increased from 1.63 at 10 degrees C to 3.00 at 37 degrees C. Two inactivation products were isolated by chromatographic fractionat...
Article
Members of a series of deoxyhalosucrose analogs substituted at one, two, or three primary carbon atoms with bromine or chlorine were prepared. Dextransucrase isolated from Streptococcus sanguis was separately treated with 6-bromo-6-deoxysucrose, 6,6′-dibromo-6,6′-dideoxysucrose, 6,1′,6′-tribromotrideoxysucrose, and 6,6′-dichlorodideoxysucrose, in o...

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