Motonori Matsusaki

Motonori Matsusaki
The University of Tokushima · Institute of Advanced Medical Sciences

PhD

About

16
Publications
680
Reads
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157
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
148 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Additional affiliations
February 2021 - present
The University of Tokushima
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (16)
Preprint
Heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1) was found as a central upregulator of molecular chaperones in stress adaptation, but it has recently been rediscovered as a major component of persistent nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). When the persistently stressed cells undergo apoptosis, the phase transition of nSBs from fluid to gel-like states is proposed to be an imp...
Article
Full-text available
P5 is one of protein disulfide isomerase family proteins (PDIs) involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein quality control that assists oxidative folding, inhibits protein aggregation, and regulates the unfolded protein response. P5 reportedly interacts with other PDIs via intermolecular disulfide bonds in cultured cells, but it remains unclear...
Article
Full-text available
Thermus thermophilus trigger factor (TtTF) is a zinc-dependent molecular chaperone whose folding-arrest activity is regulated by Zn2+. However, little is known about the mechanism of zinc-dependent regulation of the TtTF activity. Here we exploit in vitro biophysical experiments to investigate zinc-binding, the oligomeric state, the secondary struc...
Article
Full-text available
ERp57, a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, is a ubiquitous disulfide catalyst that functions in the oxidative folding of various clients in the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In concert with ER lectin-like chaperones calnexin and calreticulin (CNX/CRT), ERp57 functions in virtually all folding stages from co-translation to po...
Article
P5, also known as PDIA6, is a PDI family member involved in the ER quality control. Here, we revealed that P5 dimerizes via a unique adhesive motif contained in the N-terminal thioredoxin-like domain. Unlike conventional leucine zipper motifs with leucine residues every two helical turns on ∼30-residue parallel α helices, this adhesive motif includ...
Article
Full-text available
Oxidative protein folding is a biological process to obtain a native conformation of a protein through disulfide-bond formation between cysteine residues. In a cell, disulfide-catalysts such as protein disulfide isomerase promote the oxidative protein folding. Inspired by the active sites of the disulfide-catalysts, synthetic redox-active thiol com...
Article
Full-text available
Complicated and sophisticated protein homeostasis (proteostasis) networks in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), comprising disulfide catalysts, molecular chaperones, and their regulators, help to maintain cell viability. Newly synthesized proteins inserted into the ER need to fold and assemble into unique native structures to fulfill their physiologic...
Preprint
P5, also known as PDIA6, is a PDI-family member that plays an important role in the ER quality control. Herein, we revealed that P5 dimerizes via a unique adhesive motif contained in the N-terminal thioredoxin-like domain. This motif is apparently similar to, but radically different from conventional leucine-zipper motifs, in that the former includ...
Article
Secretory and membrane proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are folded with intramolecular disulfide bonds, viz. oxidative folding, catalyzed by the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family proteins. Here, we identified a novel soybean PDI family protein, GmPDIL6. GmPDIL6 has a single thioredoxin-domain with a putative N-terminal...
Article
Full-text available
In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER oxidoreductin 1 (ERO1) catalyzes intramolecular disulfide-bond formation within its substrates in coordination with protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and related enzymes. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the ERO1–PDI system in plants are unknown. Reduction of the regulatory disulfide bonds of the...
Article
In mammalian cells, nearly one-third of proteins are inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where they undergo oxidative folding and chaperoning assisted by approximately 20 members of the protein disulfide isomerase family (PDIs). PDIs consist of multiple thioredoxin-like domains and recognize a wide variety of proteins via highly conserved...
Article
Coupling of thiol and urea-type -NHC(=X)NH 2 (X = O or NH) groups is effective in promoting oxidative protein folding. In particular, a thiol compound coupled with a guanidyl (X =...
Article
Most proteins synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) possess intramolecular and intermolecular disulfide bonds, which play an important role in the conformational stability and function of proteins. Hence, eukaryotic cells contain protein disulfide bond formation pathways such as the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1...
Article
Full-text available
Most proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells fold via disulfide formation (oxidative folding). Oxidative folding is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-related ER protein thiol disulfide oxidoreductases (ER oxidoreductases). In yeast and mammals, ER oxidoreductin-1s (Ero1s) supply oxidation is equi...
Article
Unlabelled: Multiple enzymatic systems can catalyse protein disulfide bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. The enzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) catalyses disulfide bond formation in unfolded proteins via the reduction of oxygen. We found two QSOX homologues in the soybean genome database, Glycine max QSOX...
Article
Full-text available
β-Conglycinin, one of the major soybean (Glycine max) seed storage proteins, is folded and assembled into trimers in the endoplasmic reticulum and accumulated into protein storage vacuoles. Prior experiments have used soybean β-conglycinin extracted using a reducing buffer containing a sulfhydryl reductant such as 2-mercaptoethanol, which reduces b...

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