Moritz Ingendahl

Moritz Ingendahl
Universität Mannheim · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Psychology

About

15
Publications
2,021
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
52
Citations

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Individuals prefer letter strings whose consonantal articulation spots move from the front of the mouth to the back (e.g., BAKA, inward) over those with a reversed consonant order (e.g., KABA, outward), the so-called in-out effect. The present research explores whether individuals hold an internal standard or scheme of consonant order that triggers...
Article
Full-text available
The use of normed picture sets has become the gold standard in the study of affect, emotion, or attitudes. However, normed picture sets not only show the intended variance between pictures, but for each picture, normed ratings also show substantial variance between persons. Here, we examine whether interindividual variance in the pictures’ evaluati...
Article
People prefer linguistic stimuli with an inward-wandering consonant sequence (e.g., PATIKO) over those with an outward-wandering consonant sequence (e.g., KATIPO), a preference referred to as articulatory in-out effect. Previous research has proposed that this effect is based on a higher fluency of inward versus outward articulation. Recently, howe...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are evidently able to learn contingencies from the co-occurrence of cues and outcomes. But how do humans judge contingencies when observations of cue and outcome are learned on different occasions? The pseudocontingency framework proposes that humans rely on base-rate correlations across contexts, that is, whether outcome base rates increase...
Article
Words with an inward-wandering consonant sequence (e.g., MADIKO) are preferred to words with an outward-wandering consonant sequence (e.g., KADIMO), commonly referred to as articulatory in-out effect. Despite its robustness in consumer behavior across languages and settings, there has been no research on interindividual differences in this effect s...
Article
People prefer inward over outward articulation dynamics, a phenomenon referred to as the articulatory in-out effect. It is empirically robust and generalizes across languages, settings, and stimuli. However, the theoretical explanation of the effect is still a matter of lively debate and in need of novel research directions. Free to read at: https...
Article
Full-text available
In cultures with left-right-script, agentic behavior is mentally represented as following a left-to-right trajectory, an effect referred to as the Spatial Agency Bias (SAB, Suitner and Maass, 2016 ). In this research, we investigated whether spatial representations of activities are universal across activities by analyzing the opposite concepts of...
Article
Full-text available
The articulatory in-out effect describes the preference for stimuli with an inward-wandering consonant order (e.g., BODIKA) as opposed to an outward-wandering consonant order (e.g., KODIBA). Originally, the in-out effect has been explained in terms of articulation trajectories, with inward trajectories being preferred over outward trajectories. How...
Article
The articulatory in-out effect describes the preference for words with articulation moving inward compared to words with articulation moving outward. A promising explanation is that inward words are more fluent than outward words, but experimental evidence for such reasoning was offered only recently: By training selectively inward or outward words...
Article
Full-text available
In the last decade, there has been a growing research focus on the subtle modifications of choice architecture that have strong effects on consumer behavior and are subsumed under the term nudging. There is still little research, however, on how different nudges influence individuals with different personality characteristics. An experimental onlin...
Article
A classic phenomenon known as prototype preference effect (PPE) or beauty-in-averageness effect is that prototypical exemplars of a neutral category are preferred over atypical exemplars. This PPE has been explained in terms of deviance avoidance, hedonic fluency, or preference for certainty and familiarity. However, typicality also facilitates gre...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
- Are there interindividual differences in the appraisal of valenced stimuli? - Are these differences relevant for classical psychological paradigms?
Project
What's behind the articulatory in-out effect?