Morgane Tidière

Morgane Tidière
University of Southern Denmark | SDU · Department of Biology

Postdoctoral Researcher
Species360 Conservation Science Alliance | CPop | Southern University of Denmark

About

21
Publications
4,787
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398
Citations
Introduction
Unraveling the sex differences in survival and longevity across the tree of life. Species survival improvement under human care and its applications for species conservation.
Additional affiliations
May 2020 - present
University of Southern Denmark
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I am working on an NIH project on sex differences in survival across the tree of life and species survival improvement under human care and its applications for species conservation.
December 2018 - March 2020
University of Lyon
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • (1) Pathogens shape sex differences in mammalian aging (2) Genetic structure of two Chaerephon sp. (C. pusillus et C. leucogaster) in Madagascar and Comoro Archipelago
March 2018 - April 2018
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Variation in the ontogenetic allometry of horn length in bovids along a body mass continuum
Education
October 2012 - June 2013
Università degli Studi dell'Aquila
Field of study
  • Environmental Biology
September 2011 - June 2013
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution and Biometry
September 2009 - June 2011
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
Field of study
  • Biology of Organisms and Populations

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
In most mammals, both sexes display different survival patterns, often involving faster senescence in males. Being under intense sexual competition to secure mating opportunities, males of polygynous species allocate resources to costly behaviors and conspicuous sexual traits, which might explain these observed differences in longevity and senescen...
Article
Full-text available
While it is commonly believed that animals live longer in zoos than in the wild, this assumption has rarely been tested. We compared four survival metrics (longevity, baseline mortality, onset of senescence and rate of senescence) between both sexes of free-ranging and zoo populations of more than 50 mammal species. We found that mammals from zoo p...
Article
In humans, pronounced age differences between parents have deleterious fitness consequences. In particular, the number of children is lower when mothers are much older than fathers. However, previous analyses failed to disentangle the influence of differential parental age per se from a direct age effect of each parent. In this study, we analyse th...
Article
Evolutionary theories of senescence predict that a high allocation to reproduction during early life should have long-term deleterious consequences on future reproduction or survival because individuals have to face an energy allocation trade-off between reproductive effort and the maintenance of body condition. Using a high-quality dataset from 1,...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the effects of environmental variation on allometric relationships of condition‐dependent traits, especially in wild populations. We estimated sex‐specific static allometry between horn length and body mass in four populations of mountain ungulates that experienced periods of contrasting density over the course of the study. T...
Article
Several studies have shown higher costs of rearing sons than daughters in mammals where males are larger than females. These studies typically focus on females by examining how the offspring sex ratio during a single reproductive event affected mothers’ subsequent reproduction or survival probability. Here, we examine relationships between offsprin...
Article
A fifth of all known species are currently classified as threatened in the wild: the rate of biodiversity loss is rapid, continuous, and mostly due to anthropogenic activities. To slow down this decline, the accurate estimation of demographic parameters for threatened species is critical. With this aim, zoo institutions play an important role, givi...
Article
Full-text available
A large part of the diversity of longevity and actuarial senescence (i.e., the progressive decline of survival probabilities with age) across vertebrates can be related to body size, phylogeny, and the species’ position on the slow-fast continuum of life histories. However, differences in mortality patterns between ecologically similar species, suc...
Article
Full-text available
Actuarial senescence (i.e., the age-specific increase in mortality rate) is pervasive across mammalian species, but our current understanding of the diversity of forms that actuarial senescence displays across species remains limited. Although several mathematical models have been proposed to model actuarial senescence, there is still no consensus...
Article
Understanding the origin of sex differences in lifespan and aging patterns remains a salient challenge in both biogerontology and evolutionary biology. Different factors have been studied but the potential influence of pathogens has never been investigated. Sex differences especially in hormones and resource allocation generate a differential respo...
Article
Full-text available
Allometric relationships describe the proportional covariation between morphological, physiological, or life‐history traits and the size of the organisms. Evolutionary allometries estimated among species are expected to result from species differences in ontogenetic allometry, but it remains uncertain whether ontogenetic allometric parameters and p...
Article
In human populations, women consistently outlive men, which suggests profound biological foundations for sex differences in survival. Quantifying whether such sex differences are also pervasive in wild mammals is a crucial challenge in both evolutionary biology and biogerontology. Here, we compile demographic data from 134 mammal populations, encom...
Article
Several non-human mammalian species provide grandparental care but remain fertile until death, unlike our species. This might call into question the 'grandmother hypothesis' that the ability to provide grandparental care, associated with an increase in the cost of breeding with age, promote the early cessation of reproduction. Here, we analyse indi...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of actuarial senescence (defined here as the increase in mortality hazard with age) is often confounded with life span duration, which obscures the relative role of age-dependent and age-independent processes in shaping the variation in life span. We use the opportunity afforded by the Species360 database, a collection of individual lif...
Article
Allometry studies describe how phenotypic traits increase relative to the increase of the size of the organism. Given that the increase in size of an organism is attributable to growth, a multiplicative process, allometric relationships are often analysed on a proportional scale (e.g. a log-log scale) to account for the multiplicative nature of the...
Article
How selection pressures acting within species interact with developmental constraints to shape macro-evolutionary patterns of species divergence is still poorly understood. In particular, whether or not sexual selection affects evolutionary allometry, the increase in trait size with body size across species, of secondary sexual characters, remains...
Thesis
Full-text available
The process of actuarial senescence is defined as the progressive decline of survival per time unit with increasing age and can be characterized by two keys metrics corresponding to the age at the onset of senescence and the rate of senescence. Despite its detrimental effect in terms of fitness, senescence is a nearly ubiquitous process across the...
Article
We test whether the intensity of tooth wear influences the strength of actuarial senescence across species of large herbivores. We collected from the literature data on tooth wear in the wild (measured as the slope of the regression of log-transformed M1 crown height on age), longevity (measured as the age at which 90% of individuals are dead) and...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Despite the emblematic status of bovids horn in ecological and evolutionary studies, their allometries remained poorly studied. To fill this gap, we defined the evolutionary, static and ontogenetic allometries of horn size in Bovids, and how they may be related. We also discuss about the importance to log-transformation in allometry studies.
Project
To obtain self-sustaining populations in zoos and aquariums in the aim to reinforce or re-establish wild populations, there is a need to better understand factors influencing the fitness (survival and reproduction) parameters of these populations. Then, studying the influence to allow an individual to access to reproduction, or the number of times an individual is transferred between different zoos can lead to an optimization of zoo management practices.