Morgana Lizzio-Wilson

Morgana Lizzio-Wilson
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Psychology

PhD in Social and Feminist Psychology

About

12
Publications
1,155
Reads
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48
Citations
Introduction
My research interests include gender, collective action, and prejudice reduction. My PhD research examined the contextual factors influencing women's ingroup solidarity, and the implications of this for achieving gender equality. I'm also involved in ongoing projects examining strategies women can use to cope with stigma, and how to involve men in gender-related collective action.
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2015 - November 2015
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Lead Tutor
Description
  • Social and Organisational Psychology - Semester 2, 2015 Running weekly tutor meetings with the course co-ordinator and base tutors; Creating content for 12 weekly tutorials; mentoring new tutors.
October 2013 - June 2017
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2013 - April 2017
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
February 2009 - November 2012
The University of Queensland
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Across two studies ( Ns = 268 and 574), we examined the perceived legitimacy of sexual harassment allegations made against male allies. Overall, observers were less inclined to believe an allegation (Studies 1 and 2) and endorsed less severe punishments against a perpetrator who engaged in egalitarian (vs. sexist) behaviors toward women (Studies 1...
Chapter
When are people willing to advocate for social change, and how do we understand their resistance to such efforts? In this chapter, we provide a brief, broad overview of Social Identity Theory (SIT) and then discuss specific social identity processes which increase intergroup discrimination (i.e., distinctiveness threat, group-value threat, internal...
Article
Full-text available
Advocacy is intended to change people's attitudes and behavior. Yet the psychological and behavioral consequences of advocacy have rarely been considered. Across 3 experiments (combined N = 934) in the contexts of debates around racial discrimination and abortion, we investigated if and how exposure to advocacy can influence collective giving respo...
Article
Identity, injustice, and group efficacy are key motivations for collective action engagement. However, little work has examined factors that influence their emergence. Across 3 studies (Total N = 938), we test whether exposure to different actions (i.e., radical or conventional) and the perceived legitimacy and efficacy of those actions (“the means...
Article
Most social movements will encounter setbacks in their pursuit of sociopolitical change. However, little is known about how movements are affected after protestors fail to achieve their aims. What are the effects of failure on subsequent engagement in various conventional and radical actions? Does failure promote divergent reactions among protestor...
Article
Researchers from marginalized groups often make important social scientific discoveries about prejudice, particularly when they are members of the group under investigation (e.g., women studying sexism, Black Americans studying racism). But is the scientific integrity and validity of their work perceived differently by virtue of their membership in...
Article
Extensive research has identified factors influencing collective-action participation. However, less is known about how collective-action outcomes (i.e., success and failure) shape engagement in social movements over time. Using data collected before and after the 2017 marriage-equality debate in Australia, we conducted a latent profile analysis th...
Article
Collective action is volatile: characterized by swift, unexpected changes in intensity, target, and forms. We conduct a detailed exploration of four reasons that these changes occur. First, action is about identities which are fluid, contested, and multifaceted. As the content of groups’ identities change, so do the specific norms for the identitie...
Article
Across two studies (Ns = 265 and 735), we investigated whether women’s endorsement of hostile (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS) moderate their experience of collective threat and subsequent hostility toward traditional and non-traditional female subtypes. As expected, HS was positively associated with intra-gender hostility towards the non-traditiona...
Article
This paper introduces a model of the internalisation of normative social harmdoing: the MINSOH. This model seeks to explain how group members internalise harmful social norms such that they personally endorse their groups’ normative actions. To this aim, the MINSOH integrates two divergent yet complementary theoretical perspectives: self‐determinat...
Preprint
This preliminary study aimed to examine whether participants’ political party affiliation would affect the perceived legitimacy of sexual misconduct allegations against partisan-aligned and non-aligned political candidates. Three hundred and ninety three participants were recruited for this study. After excluding participants based on study criteri...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
We are examining whether reappropriation is an effective social change strategy. Specifically, whether women reappropriating sexist slurs (e.g. slut): a) reduces men's biases about women's sexuality; and b) helps women cope with the personal negative effects of slut shaming. We are also comparing the effectiveness of reappropriation to other strategies, such as rejecting or ignoring slurs.
Project
We are investigating whether men’s experience of social identity threat reduces their receptivity to discussions about sexism and their engagement in gender activism. The specific aims of this project are to: a) establish whether discussions about men’s violence against women contextually activate men’s social identity threat, which in turn predicts their negative reactions to these discussions and reduces their engagement in gender activism; and b) identify variables which mitigate identity threat and enhance message receptivity.