Morgan L McCarthy

Morgan L McCarthy
University of Copenhagen · Evolutionary Genomics

Erasmus Mundus MSc in Tropical Biodiversity and Ecosystems

About

8
Publications
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Introduction
I'm a marine mammal molecular ecology PhD candidate part of the University of Copenhagen - Marie Skłodowska-Curie cooperative grant called TALENT (https://talent.ku.dk/about-the-doctoral-programme/). The the overall focus of my research is speciation genomics in aquatic mammals. Two of the projects I'm involved with are in beaked whale comparative genomics and investigating extinct gray whale population structure in the Atlantic Ocean.

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Abstract available in English, Spanish and Portuguese. The deep sea has been described as the last major ecological frontier, as much of its biodiversity is yet to be discovered and described. Beaked whales (ziphiids) are among the most visible inhabitants of the deep sea, due to their large size and worldwide distribution, and their taxonomic div...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental changes are prominent in Arctic ecosystems, where the distribution, abundance, life history, and health of marine organisms such as the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) are tightly connected to sea ice and sea temperature. However, due to logistical and other challenges of data collection in the Arctic, appropriate assessments of pa...
Chapter
Full-text available
Marine biodiversity plays an important role in providing the ecosystem functions and services which humans derive from the oceans. Understanding how this provisioning will change in the Anthropocene requires knowledge of marine biodiversity patterns. Here, we review the status of marine species diversity in space and time. Knowledge of marine speci...
Article
The invasive Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus and the native European green crab Carcinus maenas share intertidal habitats along European North Atlantic shores and may compete for food. We evaluated the energy-storing capacities of the 2 species and determined their dietary preferences by means of lipid analysis and fatty acid trophic marker...
Article
Full-text available
The invasive Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus is now the second most abundant intertidal crab in the North Sea after the native European green crab Carcinus maenas. To compare their respiratory performance and energy expenditures, we measured standard respiration rates of both species from around the island of Helgoland, North Sea, Germany (...
Chapter
Full-text available
From the depths of the oceans to the shallow estuaries and wetlands of our coasts, organisms of the marine environment are teeming with unique adaptations to cope with a multitude of varying environmental conditions. With millions of years and a vast volume of water to call their home, they have become quite adept at developing specialized and uniq...

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Project (1)
Archived project
The European species Carcinus maenas and the Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus invaded different coastal areas around the world. While their invasion history and ecology has been thoroughly investigated, physiological properties of H. sanguineus are virtually unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolic energy demand of both crab species and - based on these data - to assess their potential dietary impact on the ecosystem. Respiration measurements were conducted with a newly constructed flow-through system covering a temperature range naturally experienced by these crabs. Both species were analyzed on the island of Helgoland, Germany. A general linear mixed-effects model (LMM) was applied to test for the effects of species, temperature, biomass and sex on respiration rates. From the full model, two separated LMMs were created for either species. They allowed establishing species-specific equations for the prediction of respiration rates y (nmol d-1 g-1) for a crab of any given mass xMass (g) at any given ambient temperature xTemp (°C). By applying the diet-dependent respiratory quotient, oxygen uptake may be used to calculate carbon uptake and metabolic energy demand either for single crabs or for entire populations of a given area.