Morgan E. Gilmour

Morgan E. Gilmour
United States Geological Survey | USGS · Western Ecological Research Center

PhD

About

38
Publications
2,865
Reads
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105
Citations
Introduction
I study seabirds' foraging ecology and how it relates to contaminant exposure.
Education
September 2012 - June 2018
University of California, Santa Cruz
Field of study
  • Ocean Sciences
August 2009 - July 2011
Bucknell University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2001 - June 2005
University of Rhode Island
Field of study
  • Wildlife & Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Animals that regularly traverse habitat extremes between the subtropics and subarctic are expected to exhibit foraging behaviors that respond to changes in dynamic ocean habitats, and these behaviors may facilitate adaptations to novel and changing climates. During the chick-provisioning stage, Laysan albatross Phoebastria immutabilis parents regul...
Article
Full-text available
Marine protected area (MPA) designs, including large-scale MPAs (LSMPAs; >150,000 km2), mobile MPAs (fluid spatiotemporal boundaries), and MPA networks, may offer different benefits to species and could enhance protection by encompassing spatiotemporal scales of animal movement. We sought to understand how well LSMPAs could benefit nine highly-mobi...
Article
Marine animals that traverse coastal and offshore environments are potentially exposed to multiple sources of pollution. Baseline data of pollutant concentrations of these fauna are needed in remote areas as human pop-ulations grow and economic development increases because changes may affect local wildlife in unforeseen ways. Persistent organic po...
Article
Timing of activity can reveal an organism's efforts to optimize foraging either by minimizing energy loss through passive movement or by maximizing energetic gain through foraging. Here, we assess whether signals of either of these strategies are detectable in the timing of activity of daily, local movements by birds. We compare the similarities of...
Article
Timing of activity can reveal an organism's efforts to optimize foraging either by minimizing energy loss through passive movement or by maximizing energetic gain through foraging. Here, we assess whether signals of either of these strategies are detectable in the timing of activity of daily, local movements by birds. We compare the similarities of...
Article
Latex balloons are a poorly-studied aspect of anthropogenic pollution that affects wildlife survival, aesthetic value of waterways, and may adsorb and leach chemicals. Pure latex needs to be vulcanised with sulphur and requires many additional compounds to manufacture high quality balloons. Yet, balloons are often marketed as “biodegradable”, which...
Article
Contaminants in the marine environment are widespread, but ship-based sampling routines are much narrower. We evaluated the utility of seabirds, highly-mobile marine predators, as broad samplers of contaminants throughout three tropical ocean regions. Our aim was to fill a knowledge gap in the distributions of, and processes that contribute to, tro...
Article
Marine predators are frequently exposed to contaminants through diet, and thus contaminants like mercury have the potential to be used as tracers of foraging ecology. Mercury’s neurotoxic and endocrine-disrupting effects can have far-ranging consequences for both individuals and populations, and thus mercury concentrations could also be indicative...
Article
We measured mercury (Hg) concentrations in feathers from four penguin species collected on Macquarie Island, Southern Ocean, to 1) establish baseline Hg concentrations; and 2) compare Hg from samples collected in 2002 (“modern”) and from museum specimens collected between 1937 and 1976 (“historic”). Inter-specific differences in feather Hg reflecte...
Article
Full-text available
Gadfly petrels (Pterodroma spp.) are one of the most threatened and poorly studied seabird groups, and as marine predators, are exposed to biomagnified and bioaccumulated chemical pollutants from their prey. We quantified trace element concentrations in breast feathers of seven petrel species that breed in the southern hemisphere to quantify curren...
Article
Full-text available
Due to rapidly changing global environmental conditions, many animals are now experiencing concurrent changes in both resource availability and the foraging cues associated with finding those resources. By employing flexible, plastic foraging strategies that use different types of environmental foraging cues, animals could adapt to these novel futu...
Article
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) exhibit heterozygote advantage in immune defense, which in turn can select for MHC-disassortative mate choice. However, many species lack this expected pattern of MHC-disassortative mating. A possible explanation lies in evolutionary processes following gene duplication: if two duplicated MHC gene...
Article
Full-text available
Physiological and environmental factors shape foraging strategies and energy balance. For species that breed seasonally, physiological changes in an individual can have short-term effects, but also can persist as carry-over effects from one season to the next, such as from the overwintering season to the breeding season. We tested the hypothesis th...
Article
Full-text available
The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is subject to pathogen-mediated balancing selection and can link natural selection with mate choice. We characterized two Mhc class II B loci in Leach's storm-petrel, Oceanodroma leucorhoa, focusing on exon 2 which encodes the portion of the protein that binds pathogen peptides. We amplified and sequenced...
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Conference Paper
Full-text available
• Monitoring seabird behaviors and reproductive effort and success at remote colonies can be difficult and time-consuming. • Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor) are seasonally monogamous, shrub-nesting seabirds that provide up to 12 months of parental care to their chick; males sometimes abandon parental duties earlier than females. They are not wel...
Article
Full-text available
The Papah¯anaumoku¯akea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands protects breeding habitat for many migratory animals. We used satellite telemetry to describe the areas in which a mobile top predator, the Great Frigatebird Fregata minor, traveled on foraging trips during the early chick-rearing period from a breeding colony on...

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