Monika Abels

Monika Abels
UiT The Arctic University of Norway · Department of Psychology

Dr. rer. nat. (PhD)

About

32
Publications
14,363
Reads
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970
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2015 - October 2017
Tilburg University
Position
  • Fellow
July 2012 - October 2015
Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2010 - May 2012
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
In this study the eco-cultural model of parenting (Keller, H. (2007). Cultures of infancy. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum) was applied to the study of joint attention behavior of children from families with different socio-economic status (SES). It was hypothesized that infants' early communication styles would differ with SES reflecting more independent or i...
Article
Full-text available
In developmental research, mothers are frequently asked to “play as you usually would.” In this study, maternal behavior towards their three-month-olds in three cultural communities (Nso, Cameroon; Gujarati, India; Athens, Greece) was compared between videorecorded “play” situations and naturalistic observations. If there is consistency, videorecor...
Article
In this study 9-month-old infants in rural and urban Gujarat, India were compared in how frequently and in which way they engage in triadic interactions. It was assumed that urban caregivers would engage in a child-centered interaction style, frequently creating triadic interactions and following infants' signals. It was also expected that they wou...
Article
Full-text available
This study deals with speech acts addressed to Hadza infants in Tanzania, a group that has traditionally lived off hunting and gathering. Three research questions are addressed: How do Hadza speech acts compare with those found in previous studies in other cultures? Are there differences between child and adult speakers? And do speech acts differ w...
Article
This study addresses Norwegian infants’ sleeping places during the day and night. In the first part we asked the general public to indicate where they think infants should sleep by placing stickers on a depiction of different sleeping places. This revealed that infants were expected to predominantly sleep outside in a stroller during the day and ei...
Article
This study examined whether parents are less responsive to their young children (0-5) when they use a phone. We systematically observed 53 parent-child dyads in consultation bureau waiting rooms and playgrounds. Twenty-three parents used their phone at least once during the observation. Across the dyads, we observed parent and child behavior during...
Chapter
Full-text available
There are concerns that contemporary caregivers are so absorbed by their mobile devices that it hampers their responsiveness to their children. Recent ethnographic work suggests that these concerns are warranted. Scholarly work on this issue is scarce, however, and systematic observations of the phenomenon are lacking. This chapter presents an expl...
Chapter
This chapter is an exploration of how personal life and family history interact with the experiences of being a visiting student and researcher in a foreign place. The author describes the role of writing poetry and being educated on her family background through stories. She uses her own experience of becoming a mother as a frame for the chapter a...
Article
This study introduces a peri-urban context of poverty to the study of child development in Africa in contrast to the more typical assessments in middle-class and rural contexts. Spot observations were used to assess universal caregiving behaviors toward seventy-six 3-month-old infants. Results show that middle-class infants experienced distal paren...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined conversations of 164 mothers from seven different cultural contexts when reminiscing with their 3-year-old children. We chose samples based on their sociodemographic profiles, which represented three different cultural models: (1) autonomy (urban middle-class families from Western societies), (2) relatedness (rural farmin...
Article
Full-text available
Cultures differ with respect to parenting strategies already during infancy. Distal parenting, i.e., face-to-face context and object stimulation, is prevalent in urban educated middle-class families of Western cultures; proximal parenting, i.e., body contact and body stimulation, is prevalent in rural, low-educated farmer families. Parents from urb...
Article
In this study we analyzed similarities and differences in the contingency experiences of 159 three-month-olds from 6 sociocultural contexts. Across contexts, caretakers responded with similar overall contingency levels, vocalizations provided the dominant response as well as the most salient signal, and there was a relative signal-response correspo...
Article
This study analyzes how autonomy and relatedness manifest in mothers' accounts of their ethnotheories regarding child care. Mothers came from two independent samples from urban middle-class in Germany and California, two autonomous-relational samples from urban middle-class in India and Cameroon, and one interdependent sample from rural Cameroon. T...
Article
Children's socialization environments reflect cultural models of parenting. In particular, Euro-American and Chinese families have been described as following different socialization scripts. The present study assesses parenting behaviors as well as parenting ethnotheories with respect to three-month-old babies in middle-class families in Los Angel...
Thesis
http://repositorium.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/urn:nbn:de:gbv:700-2007090716 In this thesis ethnotheories on the expression of emotional warmth towards babies were studied, considering socio-economic and cultural factors. It was proposed that the more caregivers emphasize relatedness as a socialization goal the more emphasis they were expected to put...
Article
Full-text available
This study conceptualizes a cultural model of parenting. It is argued that cultural models are expressed in the degree of familism, which informs socialization goals that are embodied in parenting ethnotheories. Three cultural models were differentiated a priori: independent, interdependent, and autonomous-related. Samples were recruited that were...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, the early social experiences of infants from two agricultural societies, Indian Rajput and Cameroonian Nso are compared to each other and to German urban middle-class families. Using spot observations, infants' social experiences were assessed when they were between 2.5 and 3 months. The parenting styles in the three communities are...
Article
In this study, the early social experiences of infants from a rural, traditionally agricultural community are compared with those of urban infants of the same region. Using spot observations, infants'daily social experiences were assessed when they were about 3 months of age. Based on overarching sociocultural orientations, the authors expected rur...
Article
In this study, the early social experiences of infants from a rural, traditionally agricultural community are compared with those of urban infants of the same region. Using spot observations, infants’ daily social expe- riences were assessed when they were about 3 months of age. Based on overarching sociocultural orienta- tions, the authors expecte...
Article
Full-text available
A linguistic discourse analysis of the study of parental ethnotheories is proposed in this paper. It is argued that not only are ideas about parenting informed by the cultural environment, but the ways ideas are formulated in language itself can be understood as expressing cultural codes. In order to identify these cultural codes, we analysed inter...
Article
Full-text available
Objective. This study analyzes culturally formed parenting styles during infancy, as related to the sociocultural orientations of independence and interdependence. Design. Free-play situations between mothers and 3-month-old infants were videotaped in 5 cultural communities that differ according to their sociocultural orientations: cultural communi...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The goal of the project is to understand communication development in Tanzanian Hadza children. The Hadza are a small scale society who partially rely on hunting and gathering for their livelihood. The project utilizes a combination of methods such as observations and video-recordings but also a device that records audio, distance of caregivers and infants' heart rate.