Monica Padilla

Monica Padilla
InBody · Clinical Research

PhD

About

30
Publications
3,301
Reads
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592
Citations
Introduction
Monica Padilla currently works at InBody, USA. Previously she worked at the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Southern California and the NYU Langone School of Medicine. Her previous worked focused on cochlear implant performance, improvements and development.
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
University of Southern California
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
December 2013 - July 2017
NYU Langone Medical Center
Position
  • Researcher
October 2007 - October 2013
House Ear Institute
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
August 1998 - May 2003
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Biomedical Engineering
August 1996 - August 1998
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Biomedical Engineering
August 1988 - April 1995
Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
Field of study
  • Electronic Engineering

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: The auditory experience of early deafened pediatric cochlear implant (CI) users is different from that of postlingually deafened adult CI users due to disparities in the developing auditory system. It is therefore expected that the auditory psychophysical capabilities between these two groups would differ. In this study, temporal resol...
Article
Full-text available
Cochlear-implant users who have experienced both analog and pulsatile sound coding strategies often have strong preferences for the sound quality of one over the other. This suggests that analog and pulsatile stimulation may provide different information or sound quality to an implant listener. It has been well documented that many implant listener...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Cochlear implants (CIs) have been shown to benefit patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) in terms of tinnitus reduction, localization, speech understanding, and quality of life (QoL). While previous studies have shown cochlear implantation may benefit SSD patients, it is unclear which point of comparison is most relevant: baseline p...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: With bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users there is typically a place mismatch between the locations stimulated by the left and right electrode arrays. This mismatch can affect performance, potentially limiting binaural benefits. One way to address this is by perceptually realigning the arrays such that a given frequency in the input st...
Article
Objectives: A postlingually implanted adult typically develops hearing with an intact auditory system, followed by periods of deafness (or near deafness) and adaptation to the implant. For an early implanted child whose brain is highly plastic, the auditory system matures with consistent input from a cochlear implant. It is likely that the auditor...
Poster
Full-text available
For patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), a cochlear implant (CI) can restore hearing in the deaf ear and improve spatial perception. The aims of this study were to evaluate the benefit of cochlear implantation in SSD patients’ sound awareness, sound source localization, speech understanding in quiet and in noise, tinnitus severity, and qualit...
Poster
Full-text available
For patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), a cochlear implant (CI) can restore hearing in the deaf ear and improve spatial perception. The aims of this study were to evaluate the benefit of cochlear implantation in SSD patients’ sound awareness, sound source localization, speech understanding in quiet and in noise, tinnitus severity, and qualit...
Article
Monopolar Virtual Channels (MPVCs) use current steering to increase the number of spectral channels provided to cochlear implant users beyond the physical number of electrodes. The current spread created with a current steered channel is similar to the spread found for monopolar stimulation, and this spread may be one of the bottlenecks for improve...
Article
Full-text available
For bilateral cochlear implant (CI) patients, electrodes that receive the same frequency allocation often stimulate locations in the left and right ear that do not yield the same perceived pitch, resulting in a pitch mismatch. This pitch mismatch may be related to degraded binaural abilities. Pitch mismatches have been found for some bilateral CI u...
Article
Objective: Cochlear implant patients have difficulty in noisy environments, in part, because of channel interaction. Interleaving the signal by sending every other channel to the opposite ear has the potential to reduce channel interaction by increasing the space between channels in each ear. Interleaving still potentially provides the same amount...
Article
Full-text available
Contralateral masking is the phenomenon where a masker presented to one ear affects the ability to detect a signal in the opposite ear. For normal hearing listeners, contralateral masking results in masking patterns that are both sharper and dramatically smaller in magnitude than ipsilateral masking. The goal of this study was to investigate whethe...
Article
Full-text available
With a cochlear implant, when stimulation from multiple channels is interleaved, the perceived loudness is greater than the loud-ness associated with any of the individual channels presented in isola-tion. This phenomenon is known as loudness summation. This study examined if loudness summation with monopolar and tripolar stimula-tion were equivale...
Article
Cochlear implant performance in difficult listening situations is limited by channel interactions. It is known that partial tripolar (PTP) stimulation reduces the spread of excitation (SOE). However, the greater the degree of current focusing, the greater the absolute current required to maintain a fixed loudness. As current increases, so does SOE....
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the integration of place- and temporal-pitch cues in pitch contour identification (PCI), in which cochlear implant (CI) users were asked to judge the overall pitch-change direction of stimuli. Falling and rising pitch contours were created either by continuously steering current between adjacent electrodes (place pitch), by...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated cochlear implant (CI) users’ ability to perceive pitch cues from time-varying virtual channels (VCs) to identify pitch contours. Seven CI users were tested on apical, medial, and basal electrode pairs with stimulus durations from 100 to 1000 ms. In one stimulus set, 9 pitch contours were created by steering current between t...
Article
Consonant and vowel confusion matrices were measured from normal hearing listeners with varying degrees of experience in English. There were five listeners each in the following categories: native English speakers, and Spanish speakers who were immersed in English at the ages of 0-5 years, 5-10 years, 10-18 years, and over 18 years. 12 vowels (hVd)...
Article
Visual deprivation during development alters the normal refinement of connections, neurotransmitter expression and physiological function in the retina. We investigated the effects of different forms of visual experience on the anatomy of retinal neurons in the mouse. Although it is generally assumed that outer retinal cells are not affected morpho...
Article
Visual deprivation alters retinal-ganglion-cell response properties through changes in spontaneous wave-like activity (Sernagor and Grzywacz [1996] Curr Biol 6:1503-1508). This activity depends on cholinergic synaptic transmission in the turtle retina (ibid; Sernagor and Mehta [ 2001] J Anat 199:375-383). We studied the expression of choline acetyl...
Chapter
Neural control refers to the manipulation of inputs to particular structures of the nervous system to cause desirable output behavior. There are two kinds of neural control mechanisms, namely, closed loop and open loop. As an example of the former, the hypothalamus receives sensory information from the body to control its temperature. If the enviro...
Article
Previous studies have shown that listeners who learned a second language later in life have poorer speech recognition compared to native listeners, particularly under difficult listening conditions. We are interested in quantifying this demonstrated deficit experienced by non‐native listeners as a function of the length of the exposure to the secon...
Article
Normal hearing listeners whose first language was Spanish were tested with English phonemes, words and sentences. Listeners were divided into four categories according to experience with the second language. Speech was presented in a sound treated booth at a level of 70 dBA. Listening conditions included noise (SNR of 15 dB, 10 dB, 5 dB, 0 dB, and...
Article
Phoneme, word, and sentence recognition was measured in listeners whose first language was either Chinese or Spanish, with varying degrees of English proficiency. Listeners were divided into four categories: (a) fully bilingual, (b) extensive English exposure after the age of 5, (c) extensive exposure between the ages of 12 and 18, and (d) extensiv...
Article
Initial and medial consonants were recorded in three vowel contexts for use in speech recognition experiments. Five male and five female talkers were recorded producing the twenty-five consonants /b, d, g, p, t, k, m, n, η, l, r, f v, θ, δ, s, z, ∫, t∫, d3, 3, j, w, M, h/ in medial (v/C/v) and initial (C/v) positions using vowels /a/ ('hod'), /i/ (...

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