Monica Gagliano

Monica Gagliano
Southern Cross University · School of Environment, Science and Engineering

PhD

About

96
Publications
86,119
Reads
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2,621
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2018 - August 2020
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Senior Researcher
July 2017 - present
The University of Sydney
Position
  • Research Affiliate
January 2015 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (96)
Article
Full-text available
In complex and ever-changing environments, resources such as food are often scarce and unevenly distributed in space and time. Therefore, utilizing external cues to locate and remember high-quality sources allows more efficient foraging, thus increasing chances for survival. Associations between environmental cues and food are readily formed becaus...
Article
Full-text available
Because water is essential to life, organisms have evolved a wide range of strategies to cope with water limitations, including actively searching for their preferred moisture levels to avoid dehydration. Plants use moisture gradients to direct their roots through the soil once a water source is detected, but how they first detect the source is unk...
Article
Full-text available
Plants do not possess brains or neurons. However, they present astonishingly complex behaviors such as information acquisition, memory, learning, decision making, etc., which helps these sessile organisms deal with their ever-changing environments. As a consequence, they have been proposed to be cognitive and intelligent, an idea which is becoming...
Article
Full-text available
Across all species, individuals thrive in complex ecological systems, which they rarely have complete knowledge of. To cope with this uncertainty and still make good choices while avoiding costly errors, organisms have developed the ability to exploit key features associated with their environment. That through experience, humans and other animals...
Article
Full-text available
Scientists are oft trained to think that “feeling” is not simply irrelevant but antithetical to their methodologies. That scientists are not simply objectively trained minds but also bodies that feel has been an important feminist contribution towards reimagining scientific knowledge—not as the product of self-directed teleological discovery, but a...
Book
Explorations of plant consciousness and human interactions with the natural world. From apples to ayahuasca, coffee to kurrajong, passionflower to peyote, plants are conscious beings. How they interact with each other, with humanity and with the world at large has long been studied by researchers, scientists and spiritual teachers and seekers. The...
Article
Full-text available
In “The Great Fish Pain Debate” (Issues, Summer 2010), Troy Vettese, Becca Franks, and Jennifer Jacquet rightly state that in Germany the assumption that fish feel pain resulted in court cases and fishing-related legislation from the 1980s onward. The initial focus was on fishing competitions, which were ruled as unjustifiable because their primary...
Article
Full-text available
In 2016 we reported evidence for associative learning in plants (Gagliano et al., 2016). In view of the far-reaching implications of this finding we welcome the attempt made by Markel to replicate our study (Markel, 2020). However, as we discuss here, the protocol employed by Markel was unsuitable for testing for associative learning.
Article
Full-text available
Treves et al. (2019) make a convincing case that conservation efforts need to go beyond an anthropocentric worldview. Implementing that vision, however, will require human advocates to represent nonhuman interests. Where will the knowledge of those interests come from? How can humans know what is in the best interest of another animal, a plant, or...
Article
Hypotheses: The drive to survive is a biological universal. Intelligent behaviour is usually recognised when individual organisms including plants, in the face of fiercely competitive or adverse, real world circumstances, change their behaviour to improve their probability of survival. Scope: This article explains the potential relationship of i...
Article
Full-text available
Planetary health, formally defined as the interdependent vitality of all natural and anthropogenic ecosystems—social, political, and otherwise—is a vast concept that has now entered the scientific lexicon. The problems associated with planetary ill-health—biodiversity losses, climate change, environmental degradation, and other problems of so-calle...
Book
Full-text available
This book assembles recent research on memory and learning in plants. Organisms that share a capability to store information about experiences in the past have an actively generated background resource on which they can compare and evaluate coming experiences in order to react faster or even better. This is an essential tool for all adaptation purp...
Chapter
Full-text available
Across all species, individuals thrive in complex ecological systems, which they rarely have complete knowledge of. To cope with this uncertainty and still make good choices while avoiding costly errors, organisms have developed the ability to exploit key features associated with their environment. That through experience, humans and other animals...
Article
Full-text available
“I think I’ve discovered the secret of life–you just hang around until you get used to it” ~ Charles Schultz. In one of the most beloved comic strip of all times, the creator of Charlie Brown and Snoopy said it all. At the most basic level, this “getting used to it”—a decrease in response to a stimulus after repeated exposure—is what behavioural h...
Article
Full-text available
Water lilies flourish in clusters and hormonally communicate together within their community. They can self-reproduce and have mobility across the water surface, being both earthed and waterborne. The capacities of water lilies are further evidence that plants require critical and cultural examination, as companion species, and that plants require...
Book
Full-text available
The eighteenth-century naturalist Erasmus Darwin (grandfather of Charles) argued that plants are animate, living beings and attributed them sensation, movement, and a certain degree of mental activity, emphasizing the continuity between humankind and plant existence. Two centuries later, the understanding of plants as active and communicative organ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Language is often said to be one of the hallmarks of being human and is thought to have emerged from the interactions of three adaptive systems, namely, individual learning, cultural transmission, and biological evolution (Christiansen and Kirby 2003). The faculty of language has provided humans with an effective tool for classifying experiences, d...
Chapter
Full-text available
Book Description. GRAFTING: do we ever do anything other than that? And are we ever free from vegetal influences when we engage in its operations? For the philosopher Michael Marder, our reflections on vegetal life have a fundamental importance in how we can reflect on our own conceptions of ethics, politics, and philosophy in general. Taking as hi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Book Description. GRAFTING: do we ever do anything other than that? And are we ever free from vegetal influences when we engage in its operations? For the philosopher Michael Marder, our reflections on vegetal life have a fundamental importance in how we can reflect on our own conceptions of ethics, politics, and philosophy in general. Taking as hi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Book Description. GRAFTING: do we ever do anything other than that? And are we ever free from vegetal influences when we engage in its operations? For the philosopher Michael Marder, our reflections on vegetal life have a fundamental importance in how we can reflect on our own conceptions of ethics, politics, and philosophy in general. Taking as hi...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, I endeavor to recount the odd history of how we have come to perceive plants as we do, and illustrate how plants themselves perceive and sense the world and, most importantly, what they can tell us about our environment—what we call Nature. Through examples of the ingenious ways plants have evolved to thrive, I engage the idea that...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Green Thread: Dialogues with the Vegetal World is an interdisciplinary collection of essays in the emerging field of Plant Studies. The volume is the first of its kind to bring together a dynamic body of scholarship that shares a critique of long-standing human perceptions of plants as lacking autonomy, agency, consciousness, and, intelligence....
Article
Full-text available
Most colour patterns in animals represent an elegant compromise between conspicuousness to ensure effective communication with preferred receivers and camouflage to avoid attracting the attention of unwanted predators. Many species, including several coral reef fishes, overcome this conflict by using ultraviolet (UV) colouration and signalling, as...
Article
Full-text available
Sentience: whatever its full scope of meaning may be, there is increasing doubt as to the wisdom of using a concept that is dependent upon a constantly changing combination of scientific and cultural assumptions as a human tool for differentiating between species of living beings.
Article
Full-text available
Language is often considered a key feature of being human, and human linguistic behavior has been adopted as the universal template for studying the nature of language and its evolution. Yet it is not always clear what ''language'' actually is, and the lack of definition calls into question the notion that human language is unique because it has no...
Article
See http://philosoplant.lareviewofbooks.org/?m=201503
Article
Full-text available
It is increasingly recognised that plants are highly sensitive organisms that perceive, assess, learn, remember, resolve problems, make decisions and communicate with each other by actively acquiring information from their environment. However, the fact that many of the sophisticated behaviours plants exhibit reveal cognitive competences, which are...
Article
See http://philosoplant.lareviewofbooks.org/?p=82
Article
Full-text available
The nervous system of animals serves the acquisition, memorization and recollection of information. Like animals, plants also acquire a huge amount of information from their environment, yet their capacity to memorize and organize learned behavioral responses has not been demonstrated. In Mimosa pudica-the sensitive plant-the defensive leaf-folding...
Article
Full-text available
Deception is ubiquitous in plant and animal kingdoms and is widely thought to provide selective advantages to the individual and evolutionary success to the species. Mimicry, a form of deception whereby an individual imitates their model to advantage by closely resembling their behavior or appearance, is particularly well documented and represented...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Sound and its use in communication have significantly contributed to shaping the ecology, evolution, behavior, and ultimately the success of many animal species. Yet, the ability to use sound is not a prerogative of animals. Plants may also use sound, but we have been unable to effectively research what the ecological and evolutionary implications...
Article
See http://www.cupblog.org/?p=10609
Article
Full-text available
Background Both competitive and facilitative interactions between species play a fundamental role in shaping natural communities. A recent study showed that competitive interactions between plants can be mediated by some alternative signalling channel, extending beyond those channels studied so far (i.e. chemicals, contact and light). Here, we test...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, I endeavor to recount the odd history of how we have come to perceive plants like we do, and illustrate how plants themselves perceive and sense the world and, most importantly, what they can tell us about Nature. Through examples of the ingenious ways plants have evolved to thrive, I engage the idea that our modern society is affl...
Article
Full-text available
Eyespots on the body of many animals have long been assumed to confer protection against predators, but empirical evidence has recently demonstrated that this may not always be the case and suggested that such markings may also serve other purposes. Clearly, this raises the unresolved question of what functions do these markings have and do they co...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, I examine human-plant perceptions and interactions in terms of developing a new perspective on the perception and the actions of people towards plants. By combining my scientific understanding of the biological world and my own experiences working with plant shamans, storytellers and mystics from around the world, I engage with the...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last two decades, important insights into our understanding of plant ecology and the communicative nature of plants have not only confirmed the existence of a wide range of communication means used by plants, but most excitingly have indicated that more modalities remain to be discovered. In fact, we have recently found that seeds and seed...
Article
Full-text available
Octopus cyanea is taken as an unregulated, recreationally fished species from the intertidal reefs of Ningaloo, Western Australia. Yet despite its exploitation and importance in many artisanal fisheries throughout the world, little is known about its life history, ecology and vulnerability. We used stylet increment analysis to age a wild O. cyanea...
Article
Full-text available
Current knowledge suggests that the mechanisms by which plants communicate information take numerous forms. Previous studies have focussed their attention on communication via chemicals, contact and light; other methods of interaction between plants have remained speculative. In this study we tested the ability of young chilli plants to sense their...
Data
Chemical testing of the experimental unit. Mean concentration of volatile anethole detected in different compartment of the experimental unit after 24 hr exposure. Volatile anethole was easily detectable and at high levels when the SPME fiber was sealed inside the central cylindrical box. However when the fiber was placed within the outer compartme...
Data
Chemical testing of the experimental unit. Details on method validation to determine whether the experimental unit was volatile-proof. (DOCX)
Data
Germination of chilli seeds across treatments. Germination of chilli seeds is affected by the mere presence of an adult fennel plant. The percentage of seed germination over time is higher when the fennel is present but all known signals are blocked (grey boxes). The median, inter-quartile range and range are represented by the middle bar, the top...
Data
Temperature profile within the experimental units. Mean temperature profile recorded inside the experimental unit over 24 hrs. The presence (i.e. F open, black dotted line; F masked, black solid line) or absence of an adult plant within the box (i.e. Control masked; grey solid line) had no effect on the temperature profiles seeds would experience w...
Data
Tested effects in each treatment. The number 1 indicates that an effect was operating in a particular treatment, while the number 0 indicate it was not operating. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about plant bioacoustics. Here, we present a rationale as to why the perception of sound and vibrations is likely to have also evolved in plants. We then explain how current evidence contributes to the view that plants may indeed benefit from mechanosensory mechanisms thus far unsuspected.
Article
Full-text available
Otolith-fish size (O-L) relationships were analysed in recruits of two damselfish species (Chrysiptera rollandi and Pomacentrus amboinensis) before and after cohorts had settled onto reefs surrounding Lizard Island in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Unexpectedly, O was found to be unrelated to L in pre-settlers of both species. Settlers sampled onl...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is predicted to affect marine ecosystems in many ways, including modification of fish behaviour. Previous studies have identified effects of CO(2)-enriched conditions on the sensory behaviour of fishes, including the loss of natural responses to odours resulting in ecologically deleterious decisions. Many fishes also rely on hea...
Article
Full-text available
Determining which marine species are sensitive to elevated CO2 and reduced pH, and which species tolerate these changes, is critical for predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on marine biodiversity and ecosystem function. Although adult fish are thought to be relatively tolerant to higher levels of environmental CO2, very little is known ab...
Article
Lipofuscin, an autofluorescent biomarker of physiological wear-and-tear, was concentrated in those areas of a fish's midbrain responsible for visual performance, suggesting a potentially strong link between physiological specialization, ecological adaptation and senescence.
Data
Determining which marine species are sensitive to elevated CO2 and reduced pH, and which species tolerate these changes, is critical for predicting the impacts of ocean acidification on marine biodiversity and ecosystem function. Although adult fish are thought to be relatively tolerant to higher levels of environmental CO2, very little is known ab...
Data
Ocean acidification is predicted to affect marine ecosystems in many ways, including modification of fish behaviour. Previous studies have identified effects of CO2-enriched conditions on the sensory behaviour of fishes, including the loss of natural responses to odours resulting in ecologically deleterious decisions. Many fishes also rely on heari...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification is one of the key threats facing coral reef ecosystems, but there are few estimates of spatial and temporal variability in pH among reef habitats. The present study documents levels of spatial variability in pH among coral reef habitats (9 to 10), among locations separated by 100’skm of latitude and between east (Great Barrier R...
Article
Full-text available
Expert opinion was canvassed to identify crucial knowledge gaps in current understanding of climate change impacts on coral reef fishes. Scientists that had published three or more papers on the effects of climate and environmental factors on reef fishes were invited to submit five questions that, if addressed, would improve our understanding of cl...
Article
Full-text available
In most egg-laying vertebrates, maternal responses to stressful conditions are translated into the release of glucocorticoid hormones such as cortisol, which are then transmitted to their developing embryos. Although such maternally transmitted hormonal resources have been shown to influence or even interfere with the optimal developmental trajecto...
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquitous coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a powerful antioxidant defence against cellular oxidative damage. In fishes, differences in the isoprenoid length of CoQ and its associated antioxidant efficacy have been proposed as an adaptation to different thermal environments. Here, we examine this broad contention by a comparison of the CoQ composition and i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Every organism has a history and its past experiences shape its present capabilities and may greatly influence the outcome of future events. For marine organisms with complex life cycles, seemingly discrete life stages separated by periods of rapid change (metamorphosis) have led researchers to focus on processes that occur within stages. Recent re...
Article
Full-text available
Eyespots have long been thought to confer protection against predators, but empirical evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of these markings and their survival value in the wild is limited. Using a mark--recapture experiment, I examined the functional significance of the eyespot on the dorsal fin of a juvenile tropical fish to its survival on c...
Article
Full-text available
Vertebrate animals localize sounds by comparing differences in the acoustic signal between the two ears and, accordingly, ear structures such as the otoliths of fishes are expected to develop symmetrically. Sound recently emerged as a leading candidate cue for reef fish larvae navigating from open waters back to the reef. Clearly, the integrity of...
Article
For organisms with complex life cycles, variation among individuals in traits associated with survival in one life-history stage can strongly affect the performance in subsequent stages with important repercussions on population dynamics. To identify which individual attributes are the most influential in determining patterns of survival in a cohor...
Article
Selective mortality within a population, based on the phenotype of individuals, is the foundation of the theory of natural selection. We examined temperature-induced shifts in the relationships among early life history traits and survivorship over the embryonic and larval stages of a tropical damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis. Our experiments sho...
Article
1. Environmentally induced maternal effects are known to affect offspring phenotype, and as a result, the dynamics and evolution of populations across a wide range of taxa. 2. In a field experiment, we manipulated maternal condition by altering food availability, a key factor influencing maternal energy allocation to offspring. We then examined how...